New recipes

Chain Restaurants Reopening for Dine-In After Coronavirus Pandemic

Chain Restaurants Reopening for Dine-In After Coronavirus Pandemic

Reopening will vary from state to state

© David Tonelson | Dreamstime.com

Cracker Barrel

© Jonathan Weiss - Dreamstime.com

Cracker Barrel has reopened restaurants in accordance with state and local guidelines even as curbside, pickup and delivery options continue. Inside the reopened dining rooms, certain tables will be closed for seating in order to support social distancing. Enhanced cleaning and disinfecting efforts are underway in each store and thermometers have been distributed to managers so they may perform daily wellness checks on employees. In addition, employees will be wearing masks. You also won’t find the famous Cracker Barrel peg games back on the tables just yet, but you can recreate it at home.

IHOP

Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Select IHOP locations have reopened for dine-in while following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and federal, state and local mandates. Some changes include team members wearing face coverings, reduced seating, single-use containers for syrups and other condiments and new one-time-use paper menus. Hand sanitizer is available to all customers and heightened cleaning and disinfecting protocols are in effect.

Chili’s

© Sandshack33 - Dreamstime.com

As Chili’s locations reopen in states that allow it, team members are required to wear face masks at all times and wash their hands for a minimum of 20 seconds every 30 minutes. All surfaces are to be disinfected every 30 minutes using effective cleaning products for coronavirus.

Applebee’s

© Deanpictures - Dreamstime.com

Applebee’s dining rooms have gradually begun reopening in states across the country. To limit the spread of the virus, locations have reduced seating, limited menu options, replaced reusable menus with single-use ones and instituted a contact-free payment system. Team members are required to wear face coverings.

Outback Steakhouse

© Jonathan Weiss - Dreamstime.com

To limit wait times at reopened Outback Steakhouse locations, guests are encouraged to sign up for a digital waitlist prior to arrival. Team members at reopened restaurants are subject to daily wellness checks and required to wear face coverings. Limits are set for seating capacity and guest party sizes. Menus and condiments are all single-use.

Olive Garden

© Jonathan Weiss | Dreamstime.com

Darden Restaurants reopened several chains over Mother’s Day weekend, including Olive Garden. The reopened dining rooms feature reconfigured seating layouts to accommodate social distancing and hand sanitizers in every lobby. Team members undergo daily temperature checks and are required to wear face masks. Customers are also encouraged to wear face masks whenever away from their assigned table.

Red Lobster

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Another Darden entity, seafood restaurant Red Lobster has reopened select locations for dine-in. Like Olive Garden employees, Red Lobster staff are required to wear face masks and undergo daily wellness checks. The restaurants provide single-use menus and are presently installing hand sanitizer dispensers at each location.

LongHorn Steakhouse

© Jonathan Weiss - Dreamstime.com

Also operated by Darden Restaurants, casual steakhouse chain LongHorn Steakhouse has similar precautions to Olive Garden and Red Lobster. Every lobby has hand sanitizer and every staff member wears a mask. Guests are urged to not congregate near the bar or in the lobby and maintain 6 feet of distance from other diners as they wait for seats in the reconfigured dining area.

The Cheesecake Factory

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The Cheesecake Factory began reopening dining rooms on May 14 with new safety precautions. Along with being provided masks and gloves, all staff and managers are subject to before-shift wellness checks. Designated employees are solely responsible for sanitizing high-contact areas each meal period. In-house seating has been reconfigured to accommodate for social distancing. The tables are also not pre-set and each restaurant is providing a QR code for guests to access a digital menu if they prefer not to use one of the restaurant’s.

Golden Corral

© Jonathan Weiss - Dreamstime.com

Known for its buffet-style dining, Golden Corral has begun reopening restaurant dining rooms under two temporary service models: cafeteria-style (food is served by staff on buffet lines) and family-style (servers bring buffet favorites to individual tables). Along with those procedural changes, other social distancing measures like floor markers, table spacing and drink delivery have been introduced.

P.F. Chang’s China Bistro

© David Tonelson - Dreamstime.com

P.F. Chang’s locations in a dozen states have reopened for dine-in. Team members are required to undergo daily wellness checks, wear masks and wash their hands at every touchpoint. The number of people per table is limited in accordance with local guidelines and customers are encouraged to place a reservation prior to arrival.

Carrabba's Italian Grill

© Ken Wolter - Dreamstime.com

Some Carrabba's dining rooms have resumed operation at limited capacity and hours in compliance with state and local regulations. The Italian spot’s precautions include the usual: required masks and wellness checks for team members, single-use or digital menus, disposable condiments, limited guests and table spacing.

Waffle House

Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Notorious for withstanding major devastation, Waffle House began closing select locations in March and reopening dining rooms in April. At open locations, according to the Waffle House Social Distancing Checklist, all associates wear face masks and menus must be either disposable, digital or sanitizable. Some chairs and booths are to be designated closed to allow for social distancing.

Texas Roadhouse

© Georgesheldon - Dreamstime.com

For reopened locations, Texas Roadhouse requires gloves, masks and temperature checks for all employees. For their part, customers are encouraged to practice social distancing and frequently wash their hands. People with any sickness symptoms or who are in contact with a person who has coronavirus or any other respiratory illness are encouraged to not visit any Texas Roadhouse location.

Miller’s Alehouse

Miller’s Ale House - North Riverside/Yelp

Select Miller’s Alehouse locations have reopened for dine-in. New precautions include limited occupancy, table spacing, no indoor waits, specific routes to restrooms and exits, disposable menus, marked floors and non-medical-grade masks for team members.

Hooters

© David Tonelson - Dreamstime.com

Hooters locations are reopening as state and local governments allow. Team members are required to wear gloves and masks at all times. They also must wash their hands at least once every 30 minutes and have their temperature checked at the start of each shift. All guests are required to use hand sanitizer upon entrance and are encouraged to wear a face covering.

O’Charley’s

© Calvin L. Leake - Dreamstime.com

Dining rooms at select O’Charley’s locations have reopened in accordance with state and local regulations. After having already stepped up their cleaning and sanitation protocols in March, O’Charley’s has since expanded cleaning precautions and introduced new measures to ensure customer and employee safety.

Burger King

Naomi Baker/Getty Images

Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil wrote in an open letter May 12 that the company’s 15,000 restaurants across North America, including Burger King, will reopen under new guidelines. Once reopened, RBI establishments like Burger King will be required to sanitize chairs and tables after each use, shut off self-service soda machines and provide all necessary beverages, condiments and trays from behind the shielded front counter.

Popeyes

ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images

Popeyes locations — also under the RBI umbrella — are required to follow the guidelines as listed under Burger King: employee face masks, closed self-service machines and increased cleaning and sanitizing measures.

McDonald’s

McDonald’s© Alakoo - Dreamstime.com


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order. 


Here Are the Restaurants That Are Doing Well During Coronavirus

Overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were before the pandemic, but pizza chains are doing great.

In the past several weeks, the steadily increasing number of coronavirus cases have caused New York City to decide against allowing restaurants to offer indoor dining during the next phase of its reopening plan, while the governor of California has ordered restaurants in 19 counties to temporarily close their dining rooms for a second time. 

Perhaps unsurprisingly, casual dining has started to slow down throughout the country𠅎ither as a result of the surging number of positive tests, because of a wariness of being in public places, or a combination of the two. (The fact that some Americans continue to flat-out refuse to wear masks probably isn&apost helping either.) 

According to research obtained by Marketwatch, spending growth at casual dining establishments was down 13% during the first week of July, compared to a 10% decline during the final week in June. “Lower casual-dining restaurant [sales are] consistent with more customers avoiding eating at restaurants due to the spike in COVID cases in states/cities that recently reopened, as dine-in occasions have higher attach rates for beverages and desserts,” the report said.

That already-dire sounding information was confirmed by the restaurant management platform Crunchtime, which reported that overall restaurant sales in the past two weeks have dropped to 64.5% of what they were in the Before Times, compared to a mid-pandemic peak (. ) of 67% in the two weeks before that. 

In six states where coronavirus cases are noticeably surging𠅊rizona, California, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas—restaurant sales have declined by 61%, compared to a 50% decline two weeks earlier. (Restaurant Business News suggests that perhaps customers "unleashed some pent-up demand" for a meal out after being locked-down for most of the spring, before reluctantly going back to their own kitchens.)

Although dine-in sales were down, quick-service restaurants like McDonald&aposs and Wendy&aposs, and coffee chains like Starbucks and Dunkin saw single-digit increases in sales last week𠅋ut those places also have the benefit of drive-through windows. (McDonald&aposs, at least, is going to rely more heavily on its drive-through capabilities: Last week, it announced that it was temporarily pausing its plans to reopen the dining rooms in the majority of its 14,000 U.S. locations.)

But the best performing restaurant sector𠅊nd the only one that is consistently growing, week after week—is pizza. While casual dining was slumping, pizza restaurants saw 43% spending growth last week, on top of a 39% increase the previous week. MarketWatch does warn that locally owned, mom-and-pop pizza joints may not fare as well as chains like Domino&aposs or Papa John&aposs, which both benefit from their mobile apps and contactless delivery options.

In late June, Yelp reported that 23,981 restaurants had permanently closed since March 1. If you can, please continue to support your favorite local spots, even if that means picking up what feels like your one millionth takeout order.