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Coolest Scientist Ever Invents Levitating Cocktails

Coolest Scientist Ever Invents Levitating Cocktails

Coolest Scientist Ever Invents Levitating Cocktails

“I’ll have a martini, levitating, not stirred.” A British scientist has invented a machine called the Levitron, which is capable of creating floating, glassless cocktails that you can sip on mid-air. The Levitron uses ultrasonic sound waves to create a small levitating field that suspends tiny drops of alcohol, which drinkers can imbibe on while the droplets float around in front of you.

“It's a pretty powerful machine,” inventor Charlie Harry Francis, "the edible inventor," told The Daily Mail. “So far we've made a levitating gin and tonic at 70 percent proof and a levitating Bloody Mary cocktail using vodka at 160 percent proof which will blow your socks off.”

The Bloody Mary is a particularly impressive feat, considering the extensive list of ingredients in that cocktail. But Francis isn't the only one working on levitating your food and drink: Morimoto recently taught The Daily Meal how to levitate an amuse-bouche.

The machine’s ultrasound waves are incredibly powerful, and because these sound waves emanating from the Levitron are beyond the range of human hearing, they won’t damage your ear drums when switched on—they will just be able to create delicious cocktails. Sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but it’s real. Francis has also invented glow in the dark ice cream and edible mist.

And as if it couldn’t get any cooler, the team is also working on creating entire floating meals, as well as a jellybean waterfall, a popcorn storm, and edible aftershave.

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit The Daily Meal's Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on [email protected]


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.


Zombie (Brent Hofacker/500px/Getty Images)

The day after Prohibition ended, Donn Beach opened his bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Hollywood. At that point, nobody drank Caribbean rum—but it was in high supply.

“Donn, unlike bartenders and bar owners in the U.S. at that time, knew what to do with it,” says cocktail historian Jeff Berry. “He’d been to the islands. He knew it was good stuff and it would make great cocktails. He invented this whole new style of mixology—people call it tiki drinks now. He called them rum rhapsodies.”

Beach’s rum rhapsodies took standard rum punch and added dimension by layering multiple types or styles of the same ingredient to create more nuanced flavors—like three different spice blends, or two different tropical juices. He invented more than 70 drinks—one of those being the Zombie, which instantly gained popularity. The Zombie mixes three types of rum, multiple fruit juices, and three different syrups to create a powerful alcoholic blend.

“It became the cosmopolitan of its day,” Berry says. “It was a challenge to the two-fisted red-blooded American male of the 1930s who would generally resist drinking a fruity, lovingly garnished drink. [Donn’s] great marketing genius was that he said, ‘No more than two to a customer or we’ll throw you out.’ It was a challenge. ‘I’m going to climb macho mountain and have three of these and not pass out.’ And it worked.”

It worked so well, in fact, that people started making copycats. Within three years, more than 150 copycat bars popped up, saying they were home of the Zombie, or named after the drink. But none of them could ever actually make the real thing Beach never published his recipe, and the instructions in his bartenders’ books were written in code. It took Berry alone about 10 years to break the code and finally create the original Zombie recipe.

Recipe from Jeff Berry:In a blender, put 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice, 1/2 ounce falernum, 1 1/2 ounces each gold Puerto Rican rum and gold or dark Jamaican rum, 1 ounce 151-proof Lemon Hart Demerara rum, 1 teaspoon grenadine, 6 drops Pernod, a dash of Angostura bitters, and 1/2 ounce Don’s mix (2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon-infused sugar syrup). Add 3/4 cup crushed ice. Blend on high for up to 5 seconds. Pour into a tall glass, add ice cubes to fill, and garnish with a mint sprig.