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Lemon Custards with Lemon Verbena

Lemon Custards with Lemon Verbena

Ingredients

  • 14 2- to 2 1/2-inch-long fresh or dried lemon verbena leaves (optional)
  • 10 2 x 1/2-inch strips lemon peel (yellow part only)
  • 1 1/2 cups whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Combine first 3 ingredients in medium saucepan. Boil until mixture is reduced to 1/2 cup, about 4 minutes. Add sugar; simmer until mixture is reduced to 1/3 cup, about 3 minutes. Stir in cream. Whisk yolks to blend in medium bowl. Gradually whisk in hot cream mixture. Whisk in lemon juice.

  • Strain custard through sieve into 4-cup measuring cup. Divide among six 2-cup ramekins or soufflé dishes. Cover ramekins with foil. Place ramekins in 13 x 9 x 2-inch metal baking pan. Add enough hot water to pan to come halfway up sides of ramekins.

  • Bake custards until just set, about 45 minutes. Remove pan from oven; let custards cool in water in pan. Transfer ramekins to refrigerator. Chill at least 4 hours or overnight. Serve chilled.

Recipe by Jeanne Thiel Kelley,Reviews Section

    • 2/3 cup sugar
    • 7 large egg yolks
    • 1 tablespoon grated lemon peel
    • 1 1/2 cups whipping cream
    • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • Unsweetened whipped cream
    1. Position rack in center of oven preheat to 325°F. Place four 3/4-cup custard cups or soufflé dishes in medium baking pan. Whisk first 3 ingredients in large bowl. Whisk in cream, lemon juice and nutmeg. Divide equally among cups.
    2. Add enough hot water to pan to come halfway up sides of cups. Bake until custard is set around edges but still moves slightly in center when gently shaken, about 55 minutes. Transfer cups to rack cool slightly. Cover chill until cold, at least 8 hours and up to 2 days. Spoon whipped cream atop custards.

    How are lemon balm and lemon verbena different from each other?

    The main difference between lemon balm and lemon verbena is the fact that they are unrelated plants from two very different parts of the world. Lemon verbena is from the Verbenaceae family and is a South American herb, while lemon balm is related to mint and is a European herb.

    Both lemon balm and lemon verbena offer a lemon aroma and flavor notes, but they do so in different concentrations. Lemon balm provides a more subdued and less sweet lemon flavor. Its lemon note has a lot in common with the citronella notes of lemongrass. The lemony properties are against a subtle background of mint. Lemon verbena is known to provide a pungent lemony aromatic note that gives it the reputation of being the most lemony of the lemon-scented herbs. Lemon verbena’s lemon note is also accentuated by a floral undertone.


    Preheat oven to 140°C fan-forced (160°C conventional). Use a sharp knife to remove kernels from corn cob. Crush rice in a mortar. Put corn, rice, cream and milk in a medium saucepan, set over very low heat. Cook gently for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, then set aside to cool.

    Transfer corn mixture to a blender with lemon verbena leaves and honey. Purée until very smooth. Pass through a fine sieve into a bowl, then whisk in yolks. Pour into 6 shallow glass bowls and place in a baking dish. Add boiling water to halfway up sides of bowls, cover dish with foil and bake for 25-30 minutes or until just set. Allow to cool to room temperature.

    Meanwhile, mix blueberries, caster sugar and lime juice in a medium saucepan. Simmer on medium heat for 5 minutes, until berries are softened.

    Spoon blueberry mixture over custards. Serve with thick cream, fresh blueberries and biscotti.

    Baked sweet corn and lemon verbena custard

    For more delicious recipes, pick up a copy of the latest issue of Better Homes and Gardens magazine in selected newsagents and supermarkets or buy online today!


    Optional Candied Lemon Peel

    With a vegetable peeler, remove the outer yellow peel from a large lemon. Slice the strips of lemon into thin strips.

    Put the lemon peel in a saucepan with 2 cups of water. Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Drain.

    To the lemon peel in the saucepan, add 2 cups of granulated sugar and 1 cup of fresh water. Place the pan over medium heat bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes, or until the peels appear translucent. Drain and arrange the peels in a single layer on a sheet of parchment paper to cool.

    Toss the cooled lemon peel with about 1/4 cup of sugar to coat. Use to garnish desserts.

    Glass Bakeware Warning

    Do not use glass bakeware when broiling or when a recipe calls to add liquid to a hot pan, as glass may explode. Even if it states oven-safe or heat resistant, tempered glass products can, and do, break occasionally.


    Okra Pilau For Dinner Tonight

    I am making this okra recipe tonight! Last summer I let you know of my obsession with okra. For an okra review: click here.

    8 bacon slices, diced
    11/2 cups sliced fresh okra*
    1 large onion, chopped
    1 green bell pepper, chopped
    11/2 cups uncooked long-grain rice
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    2 cups water or chicken stock

    Cook bacon in a large skillet until crisp remove bacon, reserving 2 tablespoons drippings in skillet.

    Sauté okra, onion, and bell pepper in hot drippings over medium-high heat 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in rice and next 3 ingredients bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until water is absorbed and rice is tender. Remove from heat stir in bacon. Let stand 5 minutes.

    You can use any variety of okra (preferably from your garden) for this recipe that Tim says will make okra lovers of us all.

    Red Velvet Okra will be in my skillet tonight. I love it’s color even though the okra turns green when cooked.

    You can’t eat Okra leaves but how lovely they are to have in your garden. Harvesting Okra every day requires your careful attention and looking in and around the whole plant and under every leaf to find Okra that may be hiding. if you let it go an extra day, you end up with giant Okra good for drying and seed saving but not much else.

    For the healthy benefits of okra including a hair rinse recipe, read this.

    Ok now, all this about Okra is persuading me to get out in the garden and start picking. Hope you are, too.

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    Lemon Flavoured herbs

    Only a hint of lemon is needed to add zest to food and enhance delicate flavours. While lemony herbs have a more subtle taste compared to pure lemon juice they are just as useful as a natural flavouring.

    Lemon grass, lemon verbena, lemon balm, and lemon thyme can be used in salads and salad dressings, herbal teas and refreshing cool drinks, in herb vinegars, and in a huge variety of fish, chicken and meat dishes.

    While their taste is not strong enough to be used as a substitute for lemon, they add their own distinctive character and can also complement the use of lemons in cooking.

    Using lemon flavoured herbs is not just about the taste, but also the fragrance. Lemon scented herbs have a clear, fresh aroma that uplifts and energises. Besides their culinary use, they can be added to pot pourri, act as insect repellents and are natural air fresheners.

    Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) is a clump forming perennial that grows up to 1 metre high, with strongly scented lemon leaves. It grows best in full sun, in fertile, well-drained soil and it needs plenty of water. It can also be grown in large containers. Being frost tender it dies down in winter but will come up again in spring. Cutting it right down and removing any old remaining stems will encourage it to sprout strongly.

    Using lemon grass: The leaves and young stems are used in South East Asian cuisine, especially with meat, curries and fish. It also makes a refreshing tea.

    Select young firm stalks. If they are soft or rubbery it means they are too old. Remove the tough outer leaves. The lower part of the stalk should be pale yellow (almost white) in color and this is the part that is used in Thai cooking. The upper green stem can be added to soups, stews and curries for extra flavour.

    To extract the most flavour, cut the stem into 5cm lengths and bruise the stem or make superficial cuts along the stem. This also helps to release the lemon flavour. Add these pieces to the curry or other dishes but remove before serving.

    Another way of using lemon grass is to cut the stalk into thin slices and put them in a food processor until the stalk is thoroughly pulped. Add this to your recipe.

    Bear in mind that Lemon grass is very fibrous and stringy so it needs to be thoroughly boiled to soften it.

    Lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) has the strongest lemon taste and fragrance of all the lemony herbs. It is a large perennial shrub that can grow between 3 to 7 metres and has sprays of delicate white flowers in summer. It can be left to grow into an informal shrub or clipped and shaped.

    Verbena grows best in full sun, likes a light soil that drains well and should be watered regularly. It is sensitive to cold and will lose its leaves in winter but can be cut back in spring and it will sprout again.

    Using lemon verbena: Add the fresh leaves to fish and poultry dishes, vegetable marinades, cooked rice just before serving, salad dressings, jams, and desserts. The leaf is tough so it should be minced finely before adding or left whole and removed before serving.

    The leaves dry well so it’s a good idea to dry a batch in summer for use in winter when the bush has died down. Dried leaves can be crumbled before adding to recipes.

    Fresh or dried leaves make delicious herbal and iced teas as well as summery drinks. Chop up leaves before putting them in drinks. Make a refreshing tea by combining dried or fresh leaves with pineapple and apple mint.

    Mix with other lemon scented herbs or with rosemary and thyme when making herb vinegars.

    The leaves flavour desserts as well, including fruit salad, custard, jellies, sorbet, and ice cream. Finely chopped lemon verbena can be used in place of lemon zest in recipes.

    Make a lemon scented sugar by putting 6 lemon verbena leaves in a cup and covering them with sugar and placing the cup in a covered jar or container. The lemon sugar can be sprinkled over the batter of muffins and cakes before baking, added to syrups and stewed fruit. Crumbled dried leaves can also be added to the batters of carrot, banana, or zucchini bread.

    Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) is a low growing perennial (30cm) that grows in moist, fertile soil and does best if it can receive morning sun and afternoon shade. Although it is a member of the mint family, it is not invasive.

    It is best to use fresh leaves as dried leaves quickly lose their aroma. The best way to preserve lemon balm is to put the leaves in water in ice cube trays and when frozen place the cubes in freezer bags.

    Using lemon balm: The leaves have a delicate taste so you need to use more than normal, compared to strong culinary herbs. Crush or bruise the fresh leaves to release the lemony flavour.

    Add finely chopped fresh leaves to salads, to lightly flavour egg dishes, as a garnish for soft cheese, incorporated into white sauce for fish, mayonnaise, marinades, vegetable soup and stews, poultry and pork. Instead of sage, use chopped lemon balm leaves in stuffing for pork, veal, or for poultry.

    On the sweet side, add to fruit salads, jellies, jams and custards. Use sprigs in herbal vinegars, especially tarragon.

    Lemon balm tea is an excellent digestive and should be drunk after a meal. Use only fresh leaves in infusions as the volatile oil tends to disappear during the drying process. The tea can be sweetened with honey. Crushed leaves add flavour to summer punches and soft drinks.

    Lemon thyme (Thymus x citriodorus) is a small, shrubby perennial that grows to 30cm, with small, bright green-yellow leaves that are lemon scented and pale mauve flowers in spring.

    Lemon Thyme likes full sun and gritty soil that drains well. It is an excellent herb for growing in containers. It is frost hardy but likes protection and if you harvest regularly keep a pot or two in a warm sunny spot for a good supply of leaves.

    Using lemon thyme: It is a robust herb that forms part of the traditional Bouquet Garni with bay leaf and parsley and does not lose its flavour in slow cooked dishes, such as casseroles, stews and potjiekos.

    This herb goes particularly well with chicken. When roasting chicken stuff the cavity with half a lemon, half a peeled onion and several sprigs of thyme and one or two sprigs of rosemary.

    Fried chicken is delicious if dried thyme is mixed with seasoned breadcrumbs and used to coat the chicken pieces. Sprigs of thyme can also be added to chicken casseroles. This could be used for fish as well.

    Lamb, pork, beef, game, veal and sausages also combine well with thyme.

    Thyme stalks are very tough and its best to remove the leaves from the stems or chop up the leaves and stems very finely. Otherwise just use whole sprigs and remove them after cooking. A fairly successful way of removing the leaves is to run them through the tines of a fork.

    Sprinkle thyme leaves over salad, incorporate the chopped leaves in a vinaigrette dressing, add to a salsa, to herb butters, to mayonnaise with garlic chives, to sauces and marinades, as well as to egg and cheese dishes.

    They add zest to vegetables such as carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, baked or sautéed vegetables, especially mushrooms and courgettes.


    What is lemon verbena?

    Turn the pages of almost any cooking magazine and you’re likely to come across an ingredient that sounds both familiar and unfamiliar at the same time: lemon verbena. Granted, it might not be in every issue of every magazine, but it has gone from an uncommon ingredient to one that even very mainstream magazines (versus smaller circulation specialty mags) don’t hesitate to include. Lemon verbena is a leafy herb with a strong lemon-y flavor. In spite of the fact that it isn’t on most people’s “must-have kitchen herbs” list, it has been a popular plant to have in the garden for centuries. It originated in South America and was brought back to Europe, where it served as both a decorative and functional plant, thanks to its strong and fresh lemon scent. It flowers, but the flowers tend to be small, rather than showy.

    Perhaps the most common use for the plant is as an herbal tea drink. Lemon alone can be very refreshing, and it combines well with a variety of other flavors, too. Elise has featured a Lemon Verbena Mint Herbal Tea before. The leaves can be dried – and will be, if you buy a prepackaged tea that features them – but they can be used when fresh, as well.

    As far as cooking goes, lemon verbena is most often used in sweet dishes. As with most herbs, you want to get all the flavor possible out of the plant without introducing the leaves themselves into your finished product. There are two easy ways to do this. One is to make a flavored sugar, letting the natural juices/oils of the herb infuse the sugar with their flavor and scent (much as I’ve done with vanilla sugar before). The sugar can then be added to any recipe. The second way to use the herb is by infusing it into a liquid. This is done by steeping the leaves in boiling or near boiling liquid, much the same way as you might make tea, then straining them out before using the liquid in another recipe. Dessert First used this technique in a verbena flavored ice cream and a parfait, both of which sound like delicious recipes if you want to get a feel for what the results of working with this herb might be like.


    Top of the list in culinary herbs is the lemon- flavoured group. They may have a more subtle taste than lemon juice, but they are just as useful.

    Only a hint of lemon is needed to add zest to food and enhance delicate flavours. Lemon grass, lemon verbena, lemon balm and lemon thyme can be used in salads and salad dressings, herbal teas, refreshing cool drinks, herbal vinegars and a huge variety of fish, chicken and meat dishes. Using lemon-flavoured herbs is not only about the taste, but also the fragrance.

    Lemon- scented herbs have a clear, fresh aroma that uplifts and energises. Besides their culinary use, they can be added to potpourri or used as insect repellents, and they are natural air fresheners.

    Lemon grass

    Cymbopogon citratus

    Lemon grass is a clump-forming perennial with strongly lemon-scented leaves. It grows best in full sun, in fertile, well-drained soil and it needs plenty of water. It grows up to 1m high and can also be grown in large containers. Being frost tender, it dies down in winter, but it will come up again in spring. Cutting it down to about 20cm and removing any old remaining stems will encourage it to sprout strongly.

    Using lemon grass:

    • The leaves and young stems have long been used in South East Asian cuisine, especially with meat, curries and fish. Select firm young stalks (if they are soft or rubbery it means they are too old) and remove the tough outer leaves. The lower part of the stalk should be pale yellow, almost white, in colour – this is the part that is used in Thai cooking. To extract the most flavour cut the stem into 5cm lengths and bruise the stem or make superficial cuts along the stem. Add the pieces to the curry or other dish, but remove before serving.
    • The upper green stem can be added to soups, stews and curries for extra flavour.
    • Lemon grass can also be pulped before it is added to a dish – cut the stalk into thin slices and use a food processor.
    • Lemon grass makes a refreshing hot tea and delicious cool drink.

    Lemon verbena

    Aloysia triphylla

    Lemon verbena has the strongest lemon taste and fragrance of all the lemony herbs. It grows best in full sun, likes a light soil that drains well and should be watered regularly. It is sensitive to cold and will lose its leaves in winter but can be cut back in spring to encourage it to sprout again.

    Using lemon verbena:

    • The leaves are tough, so they should either be minced finely before adding to a dish, or left whole and removed before serving. Add the fresh leaves to fish and poultry dishes, vegetable marinades, cooked rice (just before serving), salad dressings, jams and desserts.
    • The leaves dry well so it is a good idea to dry a batch in summer for use in winter when the bush has died down. Dried leaves can be crumbled before adding to recipes.
    • Fresh or dried leaves make delicious herbal and iced teas as well as summery drinks (chop up the leaves before putting them in drinks). Make a refreshing tea by combining dried or fresh leaves with pineapple and apple mint.
    • Mix with other lemon-scented herbs or with rosemary and thyme when making herbal vinegars.
    • The leaves can be used to flavour desserts as well, including fruit salad, custard, jellies, sorbet and ice cream.
    • Finely chopped lemon verbena can be used in place of lemon zest in recipes.
    • Make a lemon-scented sugar by putting six leaves in a cup and covering them with sugar. Place the cup in a covered jar or container and leave it for a while, while the sugar absorbs the scent. The sugar can be sprinkled over the batter of muffins and cakes before baking, added to syrups and stewed fruit. Crumbled dried leaves can also be added to the batters of carrot, banana or zucchini bread.

    Lemon balm

    Melissa officinalis

    Lemon balm is a short (30cm) perennial plant that grows in moist, fertile soil and does best if it can receive morning sun and afternoon shade. Although it is a member of the mint family, it is not invasive.

    It is best to use fresh lemon balm leaves as dried leaves quickly lose their aroma. The best way to preserve lemon balm is to freeze the leaves in water in ice cube trays and store the cubes in freezer bags.

    Using lemon balm

    • The leaves have a delicate taste so you need to use more than you would use of the stronger culinary herbs. Crush or bruise the fresh leaves to release the lemony flavour.
    • Add finely chopped fresh leaves to salads and egg dishes, and use it to garnish soft cheese.
    • Incorporate it into white sauce for fish, and into mayonnaise, marinades, vegetable soup and stews, poultry and pork.
    • Instead of sage, use chopped lemon balm leaves in stuffing for pork, veal or for poultry.
    • On the sweet side, add chopped leaves to fruit salads, jellies, jams and custards.
    • Use sprigs in herbal vinegars, especially tarragon.
    • Lemon balm tea is an excellent digestive and should be drunk after a meal. Use only fresh leaves in infusions as the volatile oil tends to disappear during the drying process. The tea can be sweetened with honey.
    • Crushed leaves add flavour to summer punches and soft drinks.

    Lemon thyme

    Thymus x citriodorus

    Lemon thyme is a small, shrubby perennial that grows to 30cm. It has little, bright green-yellow leaves that are lemon scented, and bears pale mauve flowers in spring.

    A beautiful plant, it likes full sun and gritty soil that drains well and is an excellent herb for growing in containers. It is frost hardy but likes protection from the elements, and if you harvest regularly keep a pot or two in a warm sunny spot for a good supply of leaves.


    Lime and Coconut Éclairs

    The cherry blossoms are just staring to bloom here in Vancouver and the past few days have been warm enough to just wear a light little jacket. That means spring is around the corner! Although, from instagram and snapchat, I see that some of you (err…a lot of you) are still living in the dead of winter, as in snow is still on the ground and possibly still falling from the sky.

    I feel like I'm not a real Canadian because in Vancouver, we don't have winters like the rest of Canada. Our winter is long, but it's just rain. Seriously. It just rains from October to April and it only dips below to -2 C or -4 C for a couple weeks at the most. It's not that bad at all and, honestly, I don't really mind the rain.

    I did live in Montreal for a little bit - August to April - back when I went to McGill for my first year of uni. I knew that it would get freezing cold and a shit ton of snow, but I was prepared. However, what I wasn't prepared for was -36 C with windchill on a sunny day. I would wake up in the morning and the ice crystals would be creeping up my window. Some mornings, I could actually see my breath in my dorm because the buildings were so old and apparently didn't have proper insulation?? My dorm also lived at the top of a hill, so to get to classes, everyone had to gingerly walk down the icy sidewalk that was so still, almost everyone fell at least once a day. I contemplated getting crampons. A friend of mine went to class one morning with her hair still kind of wet from her shower. Her black hair froze, turned white, and a big chunk actually broke off. Her hair broke off. Now, that's too cold. Humans shouldn't live in places where your hair freezes and breaks off.

    Anyways, my point of the matter is that I sympathize with you poor suckers still living in sub-zero climates. I know your pain. I mean, I was smart enough to come back to a more habitable climate, but hey - whatever floats your boat. Maybe you like the thrill of possibly getting frostbite every time you step out your front door.

    I feel like now is about the time when everyone - whether it's -36 C or only 10 C - could use a bit of a tropical getaway, even if it's just in the form of a dessert. Spring fruits are a bit of a ways off still, but citrus is always in season. Not actually, because the limes are probably from Mexico, but the limes always come from Mexico. We don't grow limes here in Canada.

    So, if you want to live vicariously through your taste buds, give these éclairs a try. After all, a can of coconut cream and a few limes costs much less than a plane ticket.

    Lime and Coconut Éclairs

    Pâte Choux
    Recipe from Bouchon Bakery

    175 g all-purpose flour
    33 g sugar
    240 g water
    120 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
    2.5 g salt
    250 g eggs

    Coconut and Lime Pastry Cream

    160 g whole milk
    300 g coconut cream
    3 limes, zested
    100 g eggs
    20 g egg yolks
    100 g granulated sugar
    18 g all-purpose flour
    57 g unsalted butter, at room temperature

    Lime Fluid Gel

    100 g simple syrup
    80 g fresh lime juice
    2 g agar agar

    Lime powder

    Lime powder
    Toasted unsweetened coconut

    First, make the éclairs. Preheat the oven to 375 F.

    Make templates for your éclairs by taking two pieces of parchment and using a dark pen to make a line 6 inches long. Leave 2 inches between each line as the éclairs will expand as they bake. Once you have finished, flip the parchment over so the side with the pen markings are facing the sheet pan. This will ensure that you do not get pen on your éclairs.

    Combine the water, salt, sugar, and butter in a saucepan. Place over medium heat and stir as the butter melts. Do not start at too high a heat or some of the water will evaporate before the butter melts. Once the butter has melted, increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a simmer, then remove the pan from the heat and, with a stiff heatproof or wooden spoon, stir in all the flour. Continue to stir for about 2 minutes, or until the mixture has a paste-like consistency, then place over medium heat and stir rapidly for 1 to 2 minutes, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the pan and the bottom of the pan is clean - the dough should be glossy and smooth but not dry.

    Immediately transfer the dough to the bowl of a stand mixer and mix on low for about 30 seconds to release some of the moisture. Slowly begin adding the eggs, about 50 g at a time, beating until each addition is completely absorbed before adding the next one. Continue to add the eggs, reserving 25 g, until the dough comes away from the sides of the bowl when pulled with the paddle but then grabs back on again.

    Increase the speed to medium and mix for 15 seconds to be all of the eggs are incorporated. Stop the mixer. When the paddle if lifted, the dough should form a bird's beak - it should hold its shape and turn down over itself but not break off. If the dough is too stiff, add the reserved egg.

    Transfer to an airtight container, place a piece of plastic wrap on the surface on the choux, and refrigerate for two hours or overnight.

    Transfer the choux to a piping bag fitted with a french tip if you have one or a large round tip if you don't have one.

    Starting at the side of the parchment farthest from you, hold the tip of the pastry bag 3/4 inch above the parchment and apply gentle, steady pressure as you pipe the first éclair. When the éclair is about 6 inches ling, begin to lessen he pressure, and then stop it as you bring the dough back over itself, leaving a 1/2 inch curl at the end of the éclair. Pipe the remaining éclairs. Repeat with the second sheet.

    If you are using a round tip, take a fork and gently drag it along the length of each éclair. You just want to create very light grooves, not deep gashes.

    Wet your finger and press down on the tip of each éclair. Place the sheet pans in the oven and immediately lower the temperature to 350 F. Bake for about 40 minutes, until the éclairs are beginning to brown rotate the pans halfway through. Lower the temperature to 325 F and bake for an additional 20 minutes, or until golden brown. Lower the temperature to 300 F and bake for 10 minutes longer, or until the éclairs are light and feel hollow. If you break one open, the centre should be completely cooked. Set on a cooling rack and cool completely before filling.

    For the coconut and lime pastry cream, combine the milk, coconut cream, and lime zest in a saucepan set over medium heat. Bring it to just a simmer.

    Meanwhile, combine the eggs, egg yolk, sugar, and flour and whisk to combine.

    Once the milk mixture has come to a simmer, slowly pour a small amount into the yolk mixture, whisking continuously. Continue tempering the yolks with the milk mixture, then transfer all of back into the saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking continuously, until the mixture has thickened, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat, whisk for another minute, then add the butter and whisk until combined. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl set over an ice bath. Cool to room temperature, then place a piece of plastic wrap on the surface of the pastry cream and refrigerate until cold, about 2 hours. Once it has cooled, transfer to a piping bag fitted with a very small round tip.

    For the lime fluid gel, combine the simple syrup, lime juice, and agar in a saucepan set over medium-low heat. Stirring constantly, bring the mixture to a boil and boil for 10 seconds. Remove from heat and transfer to an airtight container. Refrigerate until set, about 3 hours.

    Once the gel has set, use an immersion blender to purée it until a gel-like consistency has been reached. A drop of the gel should hold it's shape when piped and be completely smooth. Transfer to a squeeze bottle.

    For the lime powder, place the lime zest in a microwavable safe plastic container. Microwave for 10 second intervals until the zest is dry, about 1 minute. Let it cool for a few minutes, then grind it in a spice grinder to create a fine powder.

    To fill the éclairs, use a toothpick to create three holes in the bottom of each éclair - one at each end and one in the middle. Insert the piping tip of the coconut pastry cream into a hole and pipe until you start to feel a little bit of resistance. When you remove the tip, the cream should push out of the hole. Insert the tip into the two other holes and repeat the process. Repeat this process with all the éclairs.

    To finish, pipe a mixture of small and large dots of pastry cream onto the top of the éclair, then pipe small dots of lime fluid gel. Sprinkle lime powder and toasted coconut over top.


    Watch the video: How To Make Lemonade with Lemon Balm u0026 Lemon Verbena Recipe (January 2022).