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Where to Spend the Last of Your Summer Fridays in New York City

Where to Spend the Last of Your Summer Fridays in New York City

If you’ve been spending your summer Fridays at your local ‘hood bar, you might be missing out on some of the best deals of the season. There are only a handful of Friday’s left!

Caribbean Jerk & Reggae Fest at The Hall at MP
The Hall at MP Taverna starts its party on Thursday and keeps it going through Saturday. Head out to Williamsburg for a live music and dinner event that conjures up the Caribbean vibe without leaving New York City. Food from award-winning chef, Michael Psilakis, includes a Jamaican Jerk platter with jerk chicken, hot pepper shrimp, plantains, rice and beans, plus coconut curry shrimp, handmade spicy beef patties and more. There’s also rum punch, painkillers, and plenty of Red Stripe and Carib.

Tickets are $15 for general admission or $37 for general admission, plus a Jamaican Jerk platter. With the code “reggae” you get $10 off — or *hint hint* there are Groupons out there too. Click here for more information.

#TGISF at Ocean Prime
Ocean Prime is home to our favorite deal yet and not just because it starts at 2 p.m. on Fridays. New England oysters are just one dollar as part of its #TGISF end-of-the-week party. And since champs and oysters naturally belong together, they also offer $10 glasses of Veuve or Moet. Plus there are $10 cocktail of the day offers and $10 sushi rolls that include amazing lobster and prime rolls.

Guactailing at Dos Caminos
Dos Caminos Mexican restaurants launched its Guac’taill parties this summer and we can’t get enough of them. The party brings together guacamole + cocktails in the best way. The menu consists of four guacamoles such as lobster and chicharron and six cocktails that include margaritas and a sangria choice. Need to catch the Jitney but don’t want to miss the fun? Guac’tail to go.

The kit includes the ingredients to make Dos Caminos traditional guacamole and margaritas for two. Simply cut open the avocado and mix together the pre-diced ingredients to whip up a bowl of guacamole. Next, shake up the traditional margarita mix, consisting of fresh cold-pressed juices and agave nectar. Just add your favorite tequila to the mix and you’re good to go.

Rosé Fridays at Sherry-Lehmann
Leave it to Sherry-Lehmann to give wine lovers a place to drink AND shop on a Summer Friday. From 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. you can sip on a different featured rose every week. Like what you’re tasting? Pick up a bottle or two — it’s the perfect place try before you buy.

Finger Licking Fun at Dinosaur Bar-B-Que
Both the Brooklyn and Harlem outposts of Dinosaur Bar-B-Que are cooking up $5 apps including fan favorites like chili con queso nachos and chow chow topped fried green tomatoes. Beer specials run just $2-3 and drinks and wine are a few more. If you wind up making a late night of it, live music starts at 10 p.m.

For more New York City dining and travel news, click here.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


New York City is back

I knew New York City was back when I found myself dancing on top of a booth in an East Village bar last weekend.

The night began with dinner out and ended with another bargoer's drink on my shoe, eating pizza on the street, and an invitation from a six-pack-wielding stranger for my friends and I to drink beer and play "Mario Kart" at his apartment.

That is all to say: It was a normal Saturday night in NYC, one event in a weekend that felt very much like the Before Times. I also worked in the Insider office for the first time that Friday and hit the gym on Sunday.

Pfizer made all these adventures possible, and it seems that the vaccines are having the same effect on New Yorkers across the city.

For the past month, I've noticed the magical — and exhausting — things that make New York New York coming to life again: a stalled 1 train, a crowded 6 train, getting turned down by a full cab, tourists getting in my way of shopping on Fifth Avenue, trying four newly opened restaurants, the throngs of sunbathers and picnickers in Central Park, and the familiar murmurs of gossip and chatter over wine glasses on a rooftop. It's not just a feeling: New York City's economy is genuinely healing.

It's also a far cry from a year ago, when New York became the center of the coronavirus in the US and everything that once lit up New York — the distant squares of office windows, taxi-cab lights, and Times Square — dimmed.

Even today, traces of pandemic NYC remain. My Saturday bar closed at midnight, and it took about four attempts to grab a late-night bite to eat at a restaurant not closing by 11 p.m. on Friday night, an insult in the city that never sleeps.

But the return of New Yorkers, lockdown lifting, and a financial boost have revived the city's energy. NYC as we once knew it is gone, but the big city is back.


Watch the video: How RUSSIANS spend last winter days. MASLENITSA IN RUSSIA (December 2021).