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Standout Pieces from Affordable Art Fair New York

Standout Pieces from Affordable Art Fair New York

The Affordable Art Fair is an international series that brings would-be art collectors and art fans the opportunity to purchase original pieces at various price points. Having just wrapped up yesterday in New York City, the fair brought arts patrons of every income bracket and social sphere to the Waterfront Tunnel in West Chelsea, to view artworks priced from $100 to $10,000. Here's our picks for some of the most exciting works by some pretty promising artists. See which of these exciting New York talents you think may be on their way towards commanding six-figure prices within the next few years.

A World in the City

Contemporary photography by Young Sam Kim. 40 x 53 inches, $8,500 — pictured above.

Photo Credit: Pham Luan

Autumn Leaves

Oil on canvas by Pham Luan, a Vietnamese artist whose work is already in many international collections. 43 x 51 inches, priced at the Affordable Art Fair ceiling of $10,000

Photo Courtesy of Contempop Expressions

Peace of Mind

Marker on canvas by Nissim Ben Aderet. 44 x 44 inches, $6,500. This artist creates large-scale black-and-white line drawings; an additional piece available for purchase was completed live at the event.

Photo Courtesy of Manifold Editions

Stealth Kate

Digital print with diamond dust by Marc Quinn, featuring model Kate Moss. Fair curator calls it an "icebreaker piece." Priced at $3,100.

Photo Courtesy of Lawrence Fine Art

LA's Garden

Oil marker and spray paint by LA ROC, protege of Keith Haring, with a similar "graffiti" style. 38 x 40 inches, priced at $7,500.

Photo Courtesy of Koki Arts

Satellite

Silver deposit, acrylic on canvas by Jimi Gleason. Curator notes that the "metallic, space-like effect" was achieved by silver deposit mixed with paint. 15.75 x 15.75 inches, priced at $3,200.

Photo Courtesy of Cancio Contemporary

Si te pones a pensar...

Oil on wood panel by Daniel Tai Diaz. One of the largest pieces available for purchase at this event. 96 x 74 inches, priced at $10,000.

Photo Courtesy of Vogelsang Gallery

Crossing Central 2

Mixed media by Claude Roegiers. A large piece shown by Vogelsang Gallery of Belgium. 44 x 77.5 inches, priced at $6,900.

Photo Courtesy of Envie d'Art Galleries

Wall Street Journal

Lenticular print (edition of 10) by Cecile Plaisance. Festival notes describe this as an "eye-catching" piece showing "a Barbie doll either dressed or undressed with a Wall Street Journal newspaper, depending on the angle viewed." 48 x 36 inches, priced at $7,100.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.


7 Powerful Pieces of Public Art You Should See Right Now

Public art often elicits strong reactions, from the 1980s battle in New York surrounding the removal of Richard Serra’s massive steel Tilted Arc to recent sneers that a three-story bronze of Marilyn Monroe, skirt blown in the air, provided Chicagoans little more than an opportunity for tasteless selfies. What critics hail a masterpiece, taxpayers may deem an eyesore, and often the only thing remaining is a deeper rift between the two. Yet despite the ever-present risk of offending somebody, each year American cities fund ambitious, sometimes-brilliant ideas from all kinds of artists. Here is a sampling of some of the most eye-catching public installations on view this spring and summer.

&ldquoResidents of New York&rdquo by Andres Serrano (New York)

The nonprofit More Art is staging photographer Andres Serrano&aposs 𠇏ull occupation” of New York City’s West Fourth Street subway station this month by plastering its walls with dozens of large-scale portraits of homeless people. Other images and documentation from the project will be on view at the Judson Memorial Church, around Washington Square, and in telephone booths throughout the city.

&ldquoWildflowering LA&rdquo by Fritz Haeg (Los Angeles)

Fifty vacant lots and lawns across Los Angeles County are bursting into bloom thanks to the culmination of eco-artist Fritz Haeg&aposs new project. Last fall, Haeg offered local landowners free packets of native wildflower seeds and taught them how to plant and nurture them. The flowers, now at their peak, will die off this summer and then return again next spring.