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4-Year-Old Reviews $295 Menu at The French Laundry

4-Year-Old Reviews $295 Menu at The French Laundry


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Business Insider recently treated 4-year-old Lyla to a meal at one of the best restaurants in the world, and she wasn’t a fan

Honestly, any child who can sit still for a five-hour tasting is a gourmand in the making.

The newest trend in the food world? Treating young kids to extremely fancy dinners at well-known restaurants, and watching the hilariously adorable results. The latest review comes from 4-year-old Lyla Hogan, who was treated to the five-hour, $295 tasting menu at The French Laundry by the Bold Italic,and gave some blunt critiques of what Anthony Bourdain has said is “one of the best restaurants in the world.” We would probably prefer to read Lyla’s reviews over other food critics’ any day (sorry, Pete Wells).

Some of Lyla’s critical highlights included her opinion of the summer green melon soup, which tasted to her like “a Tinkerbell popsicle.” There were several dishes that Lyla simply would not try, like the caviar, but she kept drinking glasses of the house ginger ale (and subsequently took a trip to “one of the most elegant bathrooms I’ve ever seen!”), and during the charcuterie course, complete with fancy French Laundry bacon, she kept requesting “more bread!” The butter was not Lyla’s favorite part because, “it looks like the house that bees live in, and I hate bees!” Who can argue with that logic?

Surprisingly, Lyla’s favorite dishes beyond bread and soda were the black truffles, which were declared to be “black diamonds.” “Next time,” she asked, “can we have pink diamonds?” Get on that, Thomas Keller.


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Why Toddlers Deliberately Disobey (And What to Do About It)

As a Mom of three, I’ve had quite a few years of experience in surviving the toddler years. I say surviving, because at times it can literally feel like you are in full-blown survival mode.

Adrenaline is coursing through your body, pupils are dilated, your heart is beating at warp speed, and your body is primed for that fight or flight reaction when a lion is hunting its prey…only the scary lion is your toddler and you are the prey, cowering in fear.

I can remember when my first son had just hit the toddler years and the shock that it was to have my sweet little baby turn into this two year old terror. I looked forward to nap time so I could fold the laundry, call a friend, or just curl up with a good book.

Then, one day, my little guy decided he didn’t want to nap anymore. It didn’t matter what I tried, nap time became an endless battle and my son absolutely refused to stay in his room let alone give in to the sleep that his body desperately still craved.

For weeks, I felt myself going into panic mode whenever nap time approached, dreading the battle that would ensue and the parenting tactics I would resort to in order to get my son to nap. Eventually, he did go back to napping and I maintained my sanity, but not without some serious close calls.

The toddler years can bring out the worst in us as parents, especially when we are sleep deprived (toddler won’t sleep in their own bed), hungry (because the only food our toddler would willingly eat came off of our plate), emotionally spent (from fighting battle after battle with our toddler), and defeated (the battle may be over but we definitely lost).

Toddlers are infamous for being self-centered, stubborn, chronically inflexible, and deliberately disobedient.

Out of frustration and desperation, most parents attempt to control challenging toddler behavior by breaking the willful spirit of their young child.

Typically, this looks like shaming (“you’re a bad boy for hitting your brother”), spanking (slaps on the hand or bottom), time-outs (forced separation on the stairs or in the corner), threats (“you will put your shoes on by the time I count to three or else…”), bribes (“if you are a good girl while we get groceries I will buy you a candy at the end“), or consequences (“you didn’t clean up the playroom when I asked so now you will lose your favorite stuffed animal at bedtime”).

Believe me, I have been there myself many times so I am definitely not judging or looking down on any parents who find themselves relating to the examples above. Parenting can certainly bring out the worst in us, especially during the toddler years.

The problem is that this style of parenting views discipline as a form of punishment to address difficult behavior instead of viewing discipline as a method of teaching children the skills they need to be able to label their feelings, ask for help, listen to their bodies, and grow up to be emotionally stable human beings.

When we respond to toddlers acting out with shame and punishment, we create fear and mistrust in the relationship with our toddlers and end up getting more of the behavior we were trying to stop. This type of parenting creates a vicious cycle of trying to control our child using threats, bribes and punishment, only to find our toddlers acting more out of control than before!

As the adult, it is our job to show patience, self-control, and stay calm in the midst of all of the chaos and not to take our toddler’s erratic behavior personally. You aren’t failing as a parent because your toddler refuses to eat their vegetables or take a bath.

You may be thinking…that all sounds great…but what do I do when my two year old refuses to listen when I ask her to clean up and deliberately disobeys me by making an even bigger mess?

The key to go from surviving to thriving during the toddler years is to learn to play detective when it comes to your toddler’s challenging behavior.

By learning to identify some of the underlying reasons why your toddler is acting the way that they are, you can begin to parent from a place of empathy and understanding and learn to prevent some of the behaviors from happening in the first place.

Check out these seven reasons why toddlers deliberately disobey and what you can do about it!


Watch the video: Colamecos Food Show THE FRENCH LAUNDRY (May 2022).