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For Good Red Wine at Reasonable Prices Remember This Name: Garnacha

For Good Red Wine at Reasonable Prices Remember This Name: Garnacha

The grenache grape is widely planted in many corners of the wine-growing world, most notably in France and Spain but also in Australia and California, and in lesser quantities everywhere from Washington State to Mexico, Chile to South Africa, Israel to Italy, and more.

It is a prolific grape, producing well in warm climates, and as such has often been relegated to workhorse status, providing cheap red wine for blending. But it can also produce wines of extraordinary finesse, full of summer-fruit flavors with a spicy edge. Some of the best Riojas and Châteauneuf-du-Papes are entirely or largely grenache; it adds charm to Australia’s heady “GSM” blends (along with syrah and mourvèdre); and in Spain’s Aragón and Catalonia regions, among others, it consistently produces excellent, enjoyable drinkable wines at prices that are often half or a third of what their quality could demand.

International Grenache Day, always the third Friday of September, was established by the Grenache Association, a French-based organization of winemakers, wine merchants, and other wine professionals as well as just plain grenache connoisseurs. Because the group promotes the production, sales, and, above all, appreciation of grenache — and garnacha (and also cannonau, as it is known in Sardinia) – I’m sure they won’t mind if we celebrate the holiday for now with a few recommendations of wines not from France but from Spain.

Las Rocas de San Alejandro Garnacha 2012 ($12). A dense earthy wine from Calatayud in Aragón, nicely balanced, with subtle oak, and surprisingly easy drinking despite its heft.

Corona de Aragón Special Selection (2013 ($15). An entry from Cariñena in Aragón, half garnacha and half cariñena — the grape that takes its name from this region. Juicy and full, with a touch of smoke and good acidity; very lively and attractive.

Ludovicus Tinto 2012 ($15). From Terra Alta, next to Priorat in Catalonia, a generous, spicy, floral aroma leads into a flavor of ripe red cherries and strawberries, finishing with a tinge of tartness.

Particular Old Vine Garnacha 2013 ($15). A good standard for garnacha from a leading Cariñena producer, with anise and rosemary in the nose, some oak, and plenty of juicy strawberry fruit.

Coto de Hayas Centenaria Garnacha 2013 ($16). A smoky, oaky, full-bodied entry from Campo de Borja, Cariñena’s nearby northern neighbor, with a thick mouth-feel and a finish evoking fresh mint and basil.

Palacios Remondo Propriedad 2011 ($45). A 100-percent garnacha from Rioja, ripe and rich, with plenty of fruit and some wild herb character.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


Wine: cheap Spanish reds that taste anything but

I f you're feeling impoverished after the summer holidays, you may well be casting around for cheap, characterful reds. And the best place to find them is Spain, which I'd contend is the only country that can still produce a drinkable wine for less than £4.

How come? Well, first of all it produces a heck of a lot of grapes – it's the world's third-biggest wine-producing region, after France and Italy (China, fascinatingly, is now fifth). It also has a lot of relatively undiscovered and underrated wine regions, and its weather is more reliable than the rest of Europe, which keeps prices steady, according to Tesco's product development manager, Laura Jewell. That supermarket's best-selling Simply Garnacha (13.5% abv), from Campo de Borja, tops the £4 mark at £4.79, but is invariably fresh and fruity, despite the lack of a named vintage – normally a drawback with a still wine, but Tesco shifts enough of it to ensure stock is regularly replenished.

An incredible £1 cheaper is Aldi's Toro Loco Tempranillo 2013 (£3.79 12.5% abv), from Utiel Requena – the perfect student red, if ever there was one, and a good cooking wine for those starting to think about autumn stews. Asda's juicy, gluggable Casa Luis Tinto 2013 (£4 13% abv), a blend of tempranillo and garnacha from Cariñena, is another bargain buy that would go down well with everything from bangers and mash to takeaway pizza.

Pay twice that amount for a Spanish red, though – which is still not bad when you compare it with wines from other regions – and you'll be rewarded by a very decent bottle indeed. Both Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have put a fair bit of effort into broadening their Spanish ranges, focusing on wines made from old vines in lesser-known regions. Two monastrells (the Spanish name for France's mourvèdre) that appealed recently are M&S's Tapa Roja Old Vines Monastrell 2013 (£9 14.5% abv), from Yecla, which wears its abv surprisingly gracefully and Waitrose's Al-Muvedre Old Bush Vine Monastrell 2013 (£8.99 13.5% abv), which is made in Alicante by one of Spain's most talented winemakers, Telmo Rodríguez.

What's interesting about these wines is that neither is oaked, which keeps the price down and preserves the vibrant fruit character. Spain doesn't have to use oak barrels to bolster underripe grapes, nor allow the extended "hang time" (jargon for leaving grapes on the vine) that can lead to jammy flavours. Both would be great with fabada, a robust pork and bean stew.


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