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The Blues Brother

The Blues Brother


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The Hive's Ian Tobar, creates a seasonally-inspired craft cocktail menu, with highlights like The Blues Brother

At The Hive in Bentonville, Arkansas, James Beard award semifinalist Matt McClure highlights the southern culinary landscape through his refined, country cuisine. Beverage manager Ian Tabor creates a seasonally-inspired craft cocktail menu, with highlights like The Blues Brother, made with Ridgemont 1792 Reserve bourbon, Cocchi Rosso aperitif, blueberry and pink peppercorn syrup, fresh lemon, soda, and muddled blueberries and mint. Tabor shares, "The Blues Brother combines the jammy burst of blueberry with cool, fresh mint to create the ideal refreshing spring sipper."

Courtesy of Ian Tobar, The Hive.

Ingredients

  • 4 muddled blueberries
  • 1 1/2 Ounce bourbon such as Ridgemont 1792
  • 1/2 Cocchi Rosso Apertif
  • 1/2 Ounce blueberry and pink peppercorn syrup
  • 1/2 fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 dash of club soda
  • 4 mint sprig

Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Dan Aykroyd and John Landis: how we made The Blues Brothers

My original script was called The Return of the Blues Brothers and had two movies in it. John Landis turned it into a manageable 150 pages. He was the keystone of the project – he pulled it all together.

Landis wrote the “four fried chickens and a coke” scene after seeing John Belushi [who played the other Blues Brother “Joliet” Jake] consume four fried chickens. Elwood’s dry white toast came from when I grew up in Ottawa and moved from my parents’ place – my toaster was a coat hanger on a stovetop. That was an old trick. We were inspired by John Lee Hooker’s House of the Blues record – he had the suit and the shades. Who wouldn’t want to look that cool? We put on a suit and tie and ended up looking like FBI agents. It was a universal look that worked so well.

I remember coming into the diner with Aretha Franklin’s backup dancers when we were shooting her number, Think. My legs, stomach and solar plexus turned to jelly when she started to sing. Honestly, I didn’t know how I was going to get up from the stool and do the moves.

We lost John one night. But it wasn’t because he was high, it was because he was hungry and didn’t like what was available to eat on set. I couldn’t find him anywhere. Finally, I saw this path going through a parking lot and into a nearby neighbourhood so I followed it. The neighbourhood was dark except for one house. I knock on the door and say, “Excuse me, we’re shooting a movie and missing one of our actors.” The guy goes, “Oh, Belushi? He came in about an hour ago, raided my fridge and crashed on my couch.”

At the time, cocaine was a currency. For some of the crew working nights, it was almost like coffee. I never liked it myself but I wasn’t going to police others’ behaviour. We drove John Landis crazy. Sometimes he didn’t know whether we were going to show up for work after the parties, but Belushi was a professional and there was no way he wouldn’t come through.

Southern cinemas didn’t want to screen the film because of the African American artists but when it became a hit they opened up and people got to see it. It acts as cultural preservation. We made sure the writers of the material kept their publishing rights. John and I took performers’ rights only. Every one of those songs we recorded remunerated the original artists 100% due to album sales. It was an ethical decision and the songwriters today and their estates have benefited from it.


Watch the video: The Blues Brothers 1980 - Shake a Tail Feather Scene 49. Movieclips (May 2022).