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Corn, String Bean, and Potato Succotash Salad

Corn, String Bean, and Potato Succotash Salad

"We’ll often make this salad with leftover cooked corn. Add those, and you’ve got a meal."

Christopher Hirsheimer and Melissa Hamilton

Ingredients

  • 4 thin-skinned waxy potatoes
  • Salt, to taste
  • 4 ears corn, shucked
  • 1/2 Pound string beans, trimmed
  • 1 shallot or 2 scallions, finely chopped
  • Handful of parsley leaves, chopped
  • 1/3 Cup really good extra-virgin olive oil
  • Pepper, to taste

Servings4

Calories Per Serving434

Folate equivalent (total)104µg26%

Riboflavin (B2)0.2mg11.3%


Sweet Corn Succotash

Sweet Corn Succotash can be made with fresh, frozen and even leftover corn from your refrigerator! This side dish recipe goes great with almost any meal!

Nothing beats and easy side dish recipe like this succotash! Also be sure and check out our famous Spicy Mushroom Rice and our favorite Brussels Sprouts Casserole!


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I had fresh green beans and fresh corn on the cob to use so tried this as a hot dish. It was awesome! Cooked the beans for four and a half minutes then added the corn for one more minute. Drained them together. Mixed the dressing as described and threw some fresh cherub tomatoes and red onion in with that and served it all together . . . warm! Similar to the corn and tomato scramble from this site. DELICIOUS!

Like others had suggested, I used frozen corn and added roasted tomatoes for color. I also used Grey Poupon coarse mustard and it turned out great! Add minced garlic for an extra layer of great flavor. Huge hit at my LOST finale party.

After reading the other reviews, I used this recipe as inspiration only. To the pototoes, green beans (regular size, not haricots verts) and a handful of blanched frozen corn kernels, I added thin slices of red onion, a few black olives and some drained capers. Then I added lots of freshly chopped mint and parsley. I tossed it with a viniagrette of 3 parts olive oil to one part red wine vinegar, no mustard (which didn't seem to go with the other things). The result was four+ forks, but I'm only giving three to the recipe because it would be bland and too oily without the changes. My husband absolutely adored my version and he's not normally a potato salad fan. I served it with grilled veal patties. Delish. Perfect for summer BBQ's with no mayo to spoil. Don't leave out the mint, it really made the whole dish.

I omit the potatoes and roast the corn rather than blanch it, but otherwise stick to the recipe. It's always a hit and makes a nice change from the usual salads served at cookouts.

Nice, although I have to admit I am not a huge potato salad fan, but this was a hit with my guests. I a mixture of the baby reds and the little white potatoes, added a little mayo to the dessing just for a touch of creaminess and added crumbled bacon, green onions and shallots to my dessing. Really check the seasoning on this one- make sure you use black pepper and adjust the salt. everyone loved it, and I have to say, I loved the corn- it added a nice sweetness to the mustardy potatoes!

I agree with the other reviewers-too much oil and it lacks that shot of color, so I took everyone's advice. I played with the dressing, added seeded, silvered tomatoes and finely chopped shallots, and served it on a bed of baby greens. Thanks to all!

I served this recipe at a luncheon yesterday and got rave reviews. I also added some cherry tomatoes, halved, and cut the oil in half. I used a coarse mustard that was much spicier than I thought, so had to add a bit of mayo to cut the spice a bit. It turned out great!

Very good salad. I served it on top of a bed of arugula which was great. Next time, I'll throw in some halved cherry tomatoes -- should be good. Definitely reduce the oil!

It does work better to slice the potatoes before boiling. They'll need less than 10 minutes to cook and will hold their shape better. I too used a combination of red and purple-skinned potatoes and it was lovely. I added a bit of rice wine vinegar to the oil and mustard dressing as my mustard was exceptionally strong. Frozen corn works fine and doesn't even need to be cooked. Just toss it right in. This is an altogether lovely salad and the perfect accompaniment to barbequed chicken or salmon. (And yes, the recipe calls for WAY too much olive oil. Cut by half.)

I really liked this salad,my husband,though, only thought it warrented 2 forks, but he's not a huge salad fan. this would be great for a pot-luck get together. will definately make again

It was delicious. I used yukon gold potato, fresh green beans and frozen corn. The salad came out great and it became the main course! My husband and I loved it. We will certainly make it again and again.

With fresh beans, corn, potatoes this is a great summer dish. Only issue I have is the olive oil is way excessive, next thim I'll cut it to 1/3 cup and cut the vinegar to 4 tablespoons. But, the potential is there for a great repeat salad.

I am going to try this for company this weekend. Is the olive oil portion correct?

This delicious dish is a wonderful addition to any spring menu. Be sure to put the vinegar on the potaies right away, or they will dry out! YUM.


Buy fresh corn and use it promptly. Freshly harvested corn has the sweetest, most delicious flavor, and it loses that flavor as time goes on.

How to cut corn off the cob: I find it easiest to just lay the corn down on the cutting board. Slice off a strip of kernels lengthwise with a sharp knife, rotate so the flat side is against the cutting board, and repeat as necessary.

If you can’t find fresh corn or want to save a few minutes: Use defrosted frozen corn, which tastes much nicer than canned corn. We’ll be adding the corn to warm oil in the skillet, so watch out for splatters.


Mustard Potato Salad with Green Beans

This French-style potato salad is lighter than the mayo-laden deli standard, and it’s got great bright flavor from the mustard, shallot, vinegar, and capers. It’s hearty enough to work alongside a burger but refined enough to be served with a whole grilled fish.

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

2 pounds waxy new potatoes

2½ cups blanched string beans, roughly cut into bite-size pieces

1 small shallot, thinly sliced

¼ cup finely chopped chives

1. Add potatoes to a large pot of water. Add a big pinch of salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Cook until tender but still firm (about 20 minutes). Drain and let cool slightly.

2. In a blender, combine all the ingredients for the dressing and blend on high.

3. In a large bowl, combine the still-warm potatoes with the dressing, tossing well until all the potatoes are coated. Then add the rest of the salad ingredients, tossing to combine (if the potatoes have soaked up the dressing, adjust here by adding another glug of olive oil or splash of vinegar as needed). Garnish with chives.


Classic Succotash

Fall doesn’t get any more southern than this classic succotash recipe – well, unless you’re making these Southern-Style Collard Greens, that is. We kept this succotash recipe close to the original and the result is perfection. Why change a good thing? Tender lima beans, fresh corn kernels, bacon, okra and more come together to form this incredibly delicious fall side dish. What’s more, this classic succotash is easy and only requires one skillet.

Now for a little history on this dish. Succotash recipes can vary but their roots are the same. The word is Native American for “broken corn kernels” but it’s so much more than that. The framework of lima beans and corn is always the same, but you can let your imagination run wild with other ingredients. In this recipe, I’ve added okra, though it’s optional. Other recipes may call for smoked ham in place of bacon, green pepper instead of red and even butter beans in place of lima beans.

Traditionally, basil is used to give the dish a fresh, bright flavor, but I’ve also seen recipes that call for dill or tarragon. For the freshest and most flavorful succotash, opt for the best fresh produce you can find. The recipe below is the perfect blend of succotash ingredients then finished with a drizzle of melted butter. No one will be able to resist this hearty side dish.


Classic Succotash

Fall doesn’t get any more southern than this classic succotash recipe – well, unless you’re making these Southern-Style Collard Greens, that is. We kept this succotash recipe close to the original and the result is perfection. Why change a good thing? Tender lima beans, fresh corn kernels, bacon, okra and more come together to form this incredibly delicious fall side dish. What’s more, this classic succotash is easy and only requires one skillet.

Now for a little history on this dish. Succotash recipes can vary but their roots are the same. The word is Native American for “broken corn kernels” but it’s so much more than that. The framework of lima beans and corn is always the same, but you can let your imagination run wild with other ingredients. In this recipe, I’ve added okra, though it’s optional. Other recipes may call for smoked ham in place of bacon, green pepper instead of red and even butter beans in place of lima beans.

Traditionally, basil is used to give the dish a fresh, bright flavor, but I’ve also seen recipes that call for dill or tarragon. For the freshest and most flavorful succotash, opt for the best fresh produce you can find. The recipe below is the perfect blend of succotash ingredients then finished with a drizzle of melted butter. No one will be able to resist this hearty side dish.


To start making Succotash, in a medium sauté pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the minced garlic, sauté for a few seconds. Next add onions, along with white part of spring onions and cook for 2 minutes or until they are translucent.

Next, add the red bell pepper and sauté until the peppers are well roasted. Once the peppers are roasted, add the corn kernels, red kidney beans, lima beans, salt and pepper and stir fry until all the ingredients are well combined and the beans have absorbed the flavors.

You can additionally add herbs like basil, coriander or parsley to enhance the flavor of the Succotash Recipe.

Serve Succotash as a salad or a side dish for dinner along with a side of Garlic Bread with Herb Butter.


Special equipment

A mixture of at least two different types of beans produces succotash with a more interesting combination of textures, colors, and flavors. The easiest approach is to use frozen beans, such as limas, or drained canned beans, adding them to the pot as they are. For the very best results, cooking beans from scratch is the way to go. For dried beans, follow our instructions here, then drain and add to the pot reserve some of the cooking liquid for the recipe. For fresh shelling beans (available at farmers markets in the summer), follow the same instructions as for dried beans, but skip the presoaking step. You will need about 1 1/2 pounds (680g) fresh shelling beans in the pod to yield 12 ounces (340g) once shelled and cooked. (To be safe, grab 2 pounds of shelling beans.) For dried beans, about 1/2 pound (225g) dried should yield more than enough cooked beans.


Southern-Style Shrimp "Boil"

In the coastal regions of the Southern U.S., seafood boils are a way of life. Families gather to enjoy the delicious bounty of shellfish and hearty vegetables, typically boiled all together. In this inspired recipe, to build their individual flavors, we’re boiling our potatoes separately from our corn on the cob. Then we’re finishing them together—along with seasoned shrimp, lemon juice and butter—in one big pan. (If your pan isn’t big enough, feel free to use a pot!) A condiment of creamy aioli completes this late-summer feast.

Title

Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Remove and discard the husks and silks of the corn cut each cob into quarters. Trim off and discard the stem ends of the green beans. Cut the potatoes into bite-sized pieces. Peel and mince the garlic using the flat side of your knife, smash until it resembles a paste (or use a zester). Quarter and deseed the lemon. Halve the tomatoes. Pick the thyme leaves off the stems discard the stems.

Add the corn and green beans to the pot of boiling water. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until the corn is slightly tender and the green beans are bright green. Using tongs, transfer the cooked corn to a large bowl. Using a slotted spoon or strainer, remove the cooked green beans, leaving the pot of water boiling. Rinse the green beans under cold water for 30 seconds to 1 minute to stop the cooking process. Pat dry with paper towels transfer to a separate large bowl.

Add the potatoes to the pot of boiling water used to cook the corn and green beans. Cook 10 to 12 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Drain thoroughly. Transfer to the bowl of cooked corn.

While the potatoes cook, in a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, half the garlic paste and the juice of 2 lemon wedges. Stir to thoroughly combine season with salt and pepper to taste. To the bowl of cooked green beans, add the tomatoes and ¼ of the aioli. Toss to coat season with salt and pepper to taste.

Pat the shrimp dry with paper towels place in a bowl. Season with salt, pepper, half the thyme and ¾ of the spice blend. Toss to thoroughly coat. In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned shrimp and remaining garlic paste. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 4 minutes, or until the shrimp are slightly opaque. Add the cooked corn and potatoes, butter and the juice of the remaining lemon wedges season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until thoroughly combined and the shrimp are opaque and cooked through. Remove from heat.

Transfer the finished boil to a serving dish. Garnish with the remaining thyme and spice blend. Transfer the remaining aioli to a serving dish. Serve with the salad and remaining aioli on the side. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Remove and discard the husks and silks of the corn cut each cob into quarters. Trim off and discard the stem ends of the green beans. Cut the potatoes into bite-sized pieces. Peel and mince the garlic using the flat side of your knife, smash until it resembles a paste (or use a zester). Quarter and deseed the lemon. Halve the tomatoes. Pick the thyme leaves off the stems discard the stems.

Add the corn and green beans to the pot of boiling water. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until the corn is slightly tender and the green beans are bright green. Using tongs, transfer the cooked corn to a large bowl. Using a slotted spoon or strainer, remove the cooked green beans, leaving the pot of water boiling. Rinse the green beans under cold water for 30 seconds to 1 minute to stop the cooking process. Pat dry with paper towels transfer to a separate large bowl.

Add the potatoes to the pot of boiling water used to cook the corn and green beans. Cook 10 to 12 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Drain thoroughly. Transfer to the bowl of cooked corn.

While the potatoes cook, in a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, half the garlic paste and the juice of 2 lemon wedges. Stir to thoroughly combine season with salt and pepper to taste. To the bowl of cooked green beans, add the tomatoes and ¼ of the aioli. Toss to coat season with salt and pepper to taste.

Pat the shrimp dry with paper towels place in a bowl. Season with salt, pepper, half the thyme and ¾ of the spice blend. Toss to thoroughly coat. In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned shrimp and remaining garlic paste. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 4 minutes, or until the shrimp are slightly opaque. Add the cooked corn and potatoes, butter and the juice of the remaining lemon wedges season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until thoroughly combined and the shrimp are opaque and cooked through. Remove from heat.

Transfer the finished boil to a serving dish. Garnish with the remaining thyme and spice blend. Transfer the remaining aioli to a serving dish. Serve with the salad and remaining aioli on the side. Enjoy!


Watch the video: ΦΎΤΕΜΑ ΠΑΤΆΤΑΣ. 2 μέρος. (December 2021).