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Molten Dulce de Leche Cakes

Molten Dulce de Leche Cakes

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour plus more for ramekins
  • 1 2/3 cups canned or jarred dulce de leche (preferably Nestlé)
  • Vanilla or banana ice cream

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 425°. Butter and flour ramekins; transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. Using an electric mixer, beat egg yolks and egg in a medium bowl until doubled in volume and eggs hold a slight ribbon, about 2 1/2 minutes. Add dulce de leche; beat until well blended, then gradually add 2 1/2 Tbsp. flour; beat until well blended. Divide batter among ramekins.

  • Transfer sheet to oven. Bake cakes until outsides are golden brown in color but the centers still jiggle, 12–14 minutes.

  • Transfer sheet to a rack. Run a knife around edges of ramekins to loosen cakes; invert onto plates or into shallow bowls. Serve hot with ice cream.

Recipe by Florencia Courreges,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 550 Fat (g) 24 Saturated Fat (g) 14 Cholesterol (mg) 245 Carbohydrates (g) 74 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 63 Protein (g) 12 Sodium (mg) 180Reviews Section

Recipe: Canna-Caramel Molten Cakes

The chocolate molten lava cake is an iconic rich dessert that’s taken the US by storm in the last few decades, showing up in every chain restaurant and the frozen sweets aisle of every grocery store. Nothing at all against chocolate, but we’re obviously a little biased toward caramel here at Periodic edibles, so we wanted to re-create this self-saucing treat with a caramel twist! Luckily for us, the genius chef Chris Morocco with Bon Appetit’s Test Kitchen developed a recipe to do exactly that! We adapted Chris’s quick-and-easy (and decadently moist and crumbly) cake recipe to include our cannabis caramel edibles melted into the rich dulce de leche molten center, turning these personal cakes into simple edibles in no time!

We used our Relax caramel edible variety (available at select retailers across Oregon) to give these cakes a calming effect perfect for ending the night - or stress-eating a little during these anxiety-causing times! The gentle flavor profile of the Myrcene & Linalool terpenes in our canna-caramel provide very subtle floral note to add complexity to this decadent molten lava caramel cake recipe. Our Oregon Roots Purple Widow strain-specific Canna-Butter combines with the dominant terpenes of our edible for a heavy body high and relaxing mental effects to produce the perfect end-of-the-night cannabis experience.

This recipe makes 3 or 4 small molten cakes with an approximate THC dose of about 25-33mg per cake respectively, so share one with a friend for a lighter edible experience or go all out on a full mini cake if you know your edible tolerance to comfortably allow this higher dose. If you’re new to edibles, start with a small slice of cake and wait several hours before eating more to test the effects. As always with edibles, be sure to keep away from childrenand store in a clearly-marked container to avoid accidental consumption of THC.

When in doubt on dosing, start low and go slow on consuming to avoid accidental THC over-consumption. If you do find yourself feeling the effects of a too-intense high, use the tactics in our blog post to help yourself feel better.

Ingredients

For Cake
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp kosher salt
1/4 tsp baking powder
6 Tbsp unsalted room-temperature butter, plus more for ramekins
1/3 cup sugar, plus more for ramekins
1/4 cup dulce de leche (store bought or make your own with condensed milk!)
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/2 vanilla extract
4 small (6-10oz) ramekins

For Molten Caramel Center
1/4 cup dulce de leche
1 tbsp unsalted butter
2 Periodic edibles Active Cannabis Caramels

If making your own dulce de leche, place a small round baking dish or pie dish into a larger baking dish with high walls. Pour an entire can of sweetened condensed milk into the smaller dish, and place the large baking dish on the middle rack of your oven. Fill the large baking dish with warm water, about halfway up the height of the small dish, to create a water bath for gentle heating (like you would for a cheesecake). Loosely cover the small dish with foil, close the door, and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Allow your condensed milk to cook for about 2 hours undisturbed to create dulce de leche.

Once your duce de leche is completely caramelized, add in 2 Periodic edibles cannabis caramels and 1 tbsp unsalted butter, stirring completely until evenly incorporated. Dollop 4 evenly sized portions onto a silicone baking mat or a metal baking sheet, and freeze for at least 30 minutes and up to overnight to harden slightly.

Preheat oven to 350°. Whisk flour, salt, and baking powder together in a small bowl and set aside. Coat your ramekins with butter and sugar, knocking out any excess before adding the dough - don’t skip this step, as it helps the cakes slide easily from the ramekins after baking, and adds a delightful crunch to the cake surface!

Using an electric mixer on medium-high speed (or the paddle attachment if using a stand mixer), beat the sugar and butter in a medium bowl until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add 1/4 cup dulce de leche and continue to beat until incorporated, about 1 minute. Beat in eggs, one at a time, until combined, followed by vanilla extract. Beat mixture on medium-high speed 1 minute. Reduce mixer speed to low and beat in dry ingredient mixture until just incorporated.

Divide batter evenly among prepared ramekins - you may get 3 or 4 depending on your ramekin size. Make a small divot with a spoon in the top of each mound of batter. Place frozen filling onto divots, but do not press down into batter you want the filling cradled by the batter but still on the surface, as it will sink to the center during baking. Place ramekins on a small rimmed baking sheet. Bake cakes until tops are browned, firm to the touch (be careful when checking as the filling may ooze out and it is very hot), and a tester inserted into the cakes, avoiding the liquid centers, comes out clean - about 23–25 minutes.

Cool no more than 5 minutes before inverting cakes onto plates. Top with a hearty drizzle of remaining dulce de leche sauce before serving.

And you’re done! We hope you love this recipe, and feel free to send us any feedback or tag us in your social media pictures (@periodicedibles) if you try this one yourself!

Enjoy your edibles responsibly, and be sure to store any leftovers in an airtight container clearly marked with *CONTAINS THC* to avoid accidental consumption incidents. Store in the fridge for up to 4 days.


Molten Dulce de Leche Cakes

PREHEAT oven to 425° F. Butter 4 (6-ounce) ramekins. Dust with granulated sugar.

BEAT eggs in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed for 3 minutes. Beat in dulce de leche. Beat in flour and cinnamon. Spoon mixture evenly into prepared ramekins. Place on a baking sheet.

BAKE for 12 to 14 minutes or until sides of cakes begin to separate from ramekin and centers are still soft. Allow to cool for a few minutes until cool enough to handle. Run a knife around sides and invert onto serving plates. Serve warm, topped with whipped cream. Sprinkle with cinnamon, if desired.

Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving
Servings: 4 servings
Calories370
Calories from Fat100
%Daily Value*
Total Fat 11g17%
Saturated Fat 6g31%
Cholesterol 185mg61%
Sodium 180mg7%
Carbohydrates 54g18%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars 50g
Protein 13g
Vitamin A8%
Vitamin C0%
Calcium25%
Iron6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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Dulce de Leche Molten Lava Cakes

When I was in France, I adored the simple and elegant Moelleux au Chocolat or molten chocolate cake. If it was on the menu, it was getting devoured by me. That first cut when the chocolate just oozes out of the cake is one of the sexiest things you will ever see. While traveling through Spain there was something else that began to vie for my affections. Dulce de Leche! How could something taste both like milk and caramel at the same time. Then it hit me! What if I take my beloved moelleux au chocolat and fill it with this beautiful milky caramel spread. I tried both a vanilla and chocolate version when experimenting with the recipe. While incredibly delicious inside a chocolate cake (and a bit of sea salt), the dulce de leche flavour really comes out inside of a vanilla cake. What’s really great about this recipe is it’s incredibly quick to prepare and make for unexpected guests, or when you’re just feeling like something sweet.

You can always buy prepared dulce de leche from the supermarket now, but making it yourself is super easy and much more cost effective. Simply simmer some cans of sweetened condensed milk in a pot of water on the stove (pay attention to make sure there’s always enough water to keep the cans submerged) for 3 hours, or in a slow cooker if it’s more time effective for you. Either way it’s way too simple to do yourself to justify spending twice as much buying it prepared.

  • 113g (1/4 stick) butter, melted
  • 260g (1 cup) dulce de leche, slightly warm
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ⅛ salt
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 31g (1/4 cup) Flour
  1. Preheat oven to 425F. Butter and flour 8 ramekins and transfer to a baking sheet
  2. Whisk together dulce de leche and butter, set aside. Sift salt, cinnamon and flour and set aside
  3. Whip eggs, yolks and sugar until doubled in volume and can hold a ribbon of mixture without disappearing quickly.
  4. Add dulce de leche and whip until combined. Slowly add dry ingredients and vanilla and whisk to combine
  5. Divide batter among the ramekins almost to the top. Leave about 1 cm from the top
  6. Bake cakes until golden brown but still jiggle in the middle, about 12-14 minutes
  7. Run a knife along the edge of the ramekin to loosen and invert onto plate.
  8. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream or enjoy as is

After quitting her job, Michelle packed a bag and set off on a four year trip around the world. The one souvenir she brought back: a love of food and cooking. Taking a cooking class while traveling is the only thing that weighs nothing and stays with you forever. Returning home, she enrolled in the Pastry Arts program at the French Culinary Institute in New York City and has worked in some of North Americas finest restaurants and pastry shops. She currently resides in Toronto where she chronicles her travels and recipes on her blog Sweet Escapes.


Method

A quick and easy recipe that doesn’t even need a mixer!!

  • Preheat oven to 180* C (350*F) Fan.
  • Add the chocolate and butter to a saucepan and cook over a low heat. Mix with a spatula until the chocolate melts and becomes smooth and creamy (the mixture can also be prepared in a bain marie or water bath. Also in the microwave for 1 ½ – 2 minutes).
  • In a bowl, combine the eggs, egg yolks, icing sugar, salt and vanilla extract. Mix well with a hand wire until the sugar has melted.
  • Add the chocolate mixture to the egg mixture and continue mixing with a spatula for 1-2 minutes.
  • Last, add the flour and mix well until all the ingredients have become fully incorporated.
  • Grease 6 metallic baking cups and dust with some cocoa powder.
  • Fill the first 2 cups 2/3 of the way with the mixture. Use a spoon or piping bag.
  • Fill the other 4 cups half way with the mixture.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of peanut butter to the center of 2 of the cups. 1 teaspoon per cup. Press down on the peanut butter gently.
  • Add 1 teaspoon dulce de leche to the other 2 cups. Press down on it gently.
  • Top them off with the rest of the chocolate mixture , filling each one 2/3 of the way, total.
  • Transfer baking cups to a baking pan. Place on the top oven rack and bake for 8-10 minutes.
  • When you remove them from the oven they may seem undercooked in the center. Not to worry! This is how they should be. Let them rest in the baking cups for a few seconds. Turn out onto a serving platter and serve with ice cream, melted chocolate and cocoa powder.

The nutritional chart and the symbols refer to the peanut butter filling.


Can these cookies be made ahead?

Yes, but I wouldn’t fill them until ready to serve.

The baked cookies are crisp, but they start to soften once filled. So I would bake the cookies (up to 2-3 days ahead) and fill them the day I plan on eating them. If you don’t mind slightly softened cookies, you can fill them the day before.

The cookie dough can also stay in the fridge for up to 5 days, tightly wrapped, before baking. Any longer than that, I would freeze it!


Spiced apple and salted caramel lava cakes

Moist apple-spice-cake with a molten salted caramel interior, it's like fall on a plate, but better, because anything with salted caramel is ten times better. Not to mention that apples and caramel belong together. End of story.

I am well aware that many of you visit this little corner of the internet to read up on the conflicting stories and history of food and the secret plots to cover it up. This time I am afraid I'm going to disappoint you, but I will more than make it up to you with the recipe because it is so good who cares who came up with it.

All that lies behind this apple and caramel concoction is my imagination. She says while patting herself on the back.

Let me tell you that this dessert is life-changing, because like I said, it's apples and caramel for crying out loud.

But the best part of it is how incredibly easy it is to make. Except for the time spent waiting for the caramel center to freeze, the whole thing can be whipped up in a matter of minutes.

This foolproof recipe took me ages to perfect. By the time I nailed it, we had caramel-apple not-so-lava-cake coming out of our ears. For some reason, homemade caramel sauce did not seem to work. It would just get reabsorbed into the cake no matter how liquid I made it or how well I froze it.

The trial cakes were delicious, but they lacked that extra wow factor.

Every time the cakes came out of the oven, I would flip them out of the ramekins. Frenchie and I both spoon in hand, enthusiastically looking at those cakes, thinking about that exact moment you pierce into a lava cake and have that liquid center ooze out.

All that expectation only to have the most anticlimactic first bite. Sure the cakes were delicious, but they lacked that molten salted caramel center that I promised to deliver.

Frenchie told me that that was good enough and that maybe caramel would never seep out of my cakes no matter how hard I tried. But what does he know, he's an offshore wind engineer and much to my dismay the least food-oriented person I know.

It was back to the drawing boards or the kitchen in this case.

And then it hit me! I was talking to my mom about Colombian sweets when we both remembered AREQUIPE, Colombian for dulce de leche.

That thick creamy amber-colored goodness. That delicious caramel spread that Colombians will generously slather over everything. It's a question of our national identity and pride. And no Colombian ever will be caught dead saying Dulce de Leche.

Moist apple-spice-cake with a molten salted caramel interior, it's like fall on a plate, but better, because anything with salted caramel is ten times better. Not to mention that apples and caramel belong together. End of story.

I am well aware that many of you visit this little corner of the internet to read up on the conflicting stories and history of food and the secret plots to cover it up. This time I am afraid I'm going to disappoint you, but I will more than make it up to you with the recipe because it is so good who cares who came up with it.

All that lies behind this apple and caramel concoction is my imagination. She says while patting herself on the back.

Let me tell you that this dessert is life-changing, because like I said, it's apples and caramel for crying out loud.

But the best part of it is how incredibly easy it is to make. Except for the time spent waiting for the caramel center to freeze, the whole thing can be whipped up in a matter of minutes.

This foolproof recipe took me ages to perfect. By the time I nailed it, we had caramel-apple not-so-lava-cake coming out of our ears. For some reason, homemade caramel sauce did not seem to work. It would just get reabsorbed into the cake no matter how liquid I made it or how well I froze it.

The trial cakes were delicious, but they lacked that extra wow factor.

Every time the cakes came out of the oven, I would flip them out of the ramekins. Frenchie and I both spoon in hand, enthusiastically looking at those cakes, thinking about that exact moment you pierce into a lava cake and have that liquid center ooze out.

All that expectation only to have the most anticlimactic first bite. Sure the cakes were delicious, but they lacked that molten salted caramel center that I promised to deliver.

Frenchie told me that that was good enough and that maybe caramel would never seep out of my cakes no matter how hard I tried. But what does he know, he's an offshore wind engineer and much to my dismay the least food-oriented person I know.

It was back to the drawing boards or the kitchen in this case.

And then it hit me! I was talking to my mom about Colombian sweets when we both remembered AREQUIPE, Colombian for dulce de leche.

That thick creamy amber-colored goodness. That delicious caramel spread that Colombians will generously slather over everything. It's a question of our national identity and pride. And no Colombian ever will be caught dead saying Dulce de Leche.

I have to admit I wasn't so into arequipe. I used to find it a bit too sweet and preferred butterscotch or salted caramel. I could kick my old self. But as usual, absence makes the heart grow stronger, and so I find myself yearning for arequipe like never before.

Could I swap that homemade salted caramel for arequipe adding a bit of salt to get that same flavor? It sounded like a great idea, but would it work?

I opened my cupboard, searching for arequipe only to find my stash entirely depleted, except for a specialty coconut arequipe, which was a no go or this recipe. I had to improvise.

Determined to make these cakes work, I dashed over to the supermarket. I picked up a can of sweetened condensed milk and a can of caramel that looked just like arequipe. I also picked up a full cart of groceries that I didn't need because I can't help myself when food shopping, but that's beside the point.

Turns out that can of caramel was arequipe. I was delighted! Not only were my little cakes a step closer to fruition, but Colombian desserts in England here I come!

FYI you can make arequipe at home if you can't find dulce de leche at your supermarket by boiling a can of sweetened condensed milk for around 3 hours.

I started experimenting with the "caramel", and after a few trials, I cracked it!

My freezer looked like a lab. Scratch that my kitchen looked like a lab. I had a bunch of trays with arequipe variations all neatly labeled, of course, in my bread and veggie drawers. The contents of said drawers all spread over the kitchen island. It was a great moment to sort through my freezer and clean out my fridge, while I anxiously waited for the caramel to freeze.

When they looked solid enough I whipped up the cake batter and added a little extra apple for tartness and just a bit extra cinnamon and ginger for warmth.

I poured the cake batter halfway into the greased ramekins. I added the frozen arequipe and then topped it off with another dollop of the apple mixture. I crossed my fingers and popped them in the oven.

All that was left to do was pray to the cake fairies and hope that it would work.

The buzzer went off. Excitement and pastry expectations were high. I knew I could only make Frenchie eat one more before he would tell me to throw in the towel. So just in case, I kept quiet.

I took them out of the oven. If I would have left in for too long, that silky caramel center would disappear, and I had already had one too many Houdini-like caramel fiascos.

So there I was with my ramekin upside-down. I carefully lifted the container, holding my breath the whole time. The cake unmolded perfectly. I still wasn't breathing, which in retrospect, make me realize how seriously I take baking.

I grabbed a spoon, took a deep breath, finally, and pierced the cake with my spoon. I reluctantly opened one eye. Much to my amazement there it was that beautiful amber puddle.

I was in the middle of performing a choreographed happy dance with my spoon when the kitchen door flung open. Frenchie was looking at me with the most puzzled face. I could almost tell he was wondering if he might regret having tied the knot to this nut job.

And then he glanced at the counter and saw that beautiful apple cake surrounded by that liquid caramel. It all made sense now.

"You did it!" he said. Only to complain seconds later that I didn't call him and that I was keeping this cake to myself. I handed him a spoon and saw his face light up immediately.

I continued to dance, a bit less energetically, while he grinned at me. I wish I could get that man properly worked-up about cake, but that's another story.

I highly recommend that you go out and get yourself a can of caramel, dulce de leche, arequipe, or even a can of condensed milk and the tartest apples you can find and make these.

Because once you dive your spoon into that apple-and-caramel goodness, I can assure you will be dancing in your kitchen as well.


Bolinho Quente de Doce de Leitie (Molten Dulce de Leche Cake with Sour Cream Sorbet)

Rating: 0
  • Description: "The Molten Dulce de Leche Cake with the Sour Cream Sorbet is so yummy," said Great Host Melissa Utschig. "I've made it multiple times. What's great about it for entertaining is that you can make it in advance and just bake it off during your party." It's from Leticia Moreinos Schwartz's book, "The Brazilian Kitchen."

Ingredients:

Preparation:

Make Sour Cream Sorbet: In a medium-size, heavy-bottomed saucepan, bring water, sugar, corn syrup and lemon zest to a boil. Strain the sugar syrup to ensure a smooth consistency and set bowl directly in an ice bath and let cool completely.

When cool, whisk in sour cream. Add lemon juice to taste and chill 6 hours.

Run through an ice cream machine following instructions on machine.

Make Molten Dulce de Leche Cake:Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

You will need 5 foil baking cups, without liners. (I use Reynolds brand cups that are 3 ½ inches in diameter). Space cups apart on shallow baking pan and coat with nonstick baking spray with flour.

Melt butter in a medium saucepan over very low heat. When butter is just melted, remove pan from heat and slowly mix in the dulce de leche. Whisk slowly and constantly until blended, 3 to 5 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk egg yolks and whole eggs together. Add sugar and salt. Slowly pour dulce de leche mixture into eggs and whisk well. Add cinnamon and vanilla and continue to whisk. Very gradually add sifted flour and fold gently with a rubber spatula, making sure there are no lumps.

Carefully pour batter into the foil cups, filling each one almost to the top. (This can be done up to 5 days ahead, covered and left in refrigerator.)

To ensure a molten center, bake the cakes in preheated oven 8 to 10 minutes or until edges are set but center is still soft. Cakes will not change color or rise, and the center — measuring about the size of a quarter — should jiggle. (Note: Tester needed 17 minutes, but it worked fine.)

Remove cakes from oven. Let set about 1 minute and then carefully loosen edges of foil cup and invert them onto individual serving plates.

Remove foil cup completely and serve with a scoop of Sour Cream Sorbet. Garnish with sliced bananas, mangoes, cherries or almonds, if desired.


Bolinho Quente de Doce de Leitie (Molten Dulce de Leche Cake with Sour Cream Sorbet)

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"The Molten Dulce de Leche Cake with the Sour Cream Sorbet is so yummy," said Great Host Melissa Utschig. (Photo: Michael Sears, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) Buy Photo

These decadent cakes from Great Host Melissa Utschig can be made in advance and baked off just before serving.

Sour Cream Sorbet:

  • ¾ cup water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 pound sour cream
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons lemon juice to taste

Molten Dulce de Leche Cake:

  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter
  • 1 cup dulce de leche, at room temperature (available at most grocery stores)
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 large whole eggs
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup flour, sifted

Make Sour Cream Sorbet: In a medium-size, heavy-bottomed saucepan, bring water, sugar, corn syrup and lemon zest to a boil. Strain the sugar syrup to ensure a smooth consistency and set bowl directly in an ice bath and let cool completely.

When cool, whisk in sour cream. Add lemon juice to taste and chill 6 hours.

Run through an ice cream machine following instructions on machine.

Make Molten Dulce de Leche Cake: Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

You will need 5 foil baking cups, without liners. (I use Reynolds brand cups that are 3 ½ inches in diameter). Space cups apart on shallow baking pan and coat with nonstick baking spray with flour.

Melt butter in a medium saucepan over very low heat. When butter is just melted, remove pan from heat and slowly mix in the dulce de leche. Whisk slowly and constantly until blended, 3 to 5 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk egg yolks and whole eggs together. Add sugar and salt. Slowly pour dulce de leche mixture into eggs and whisk well. Add cinnamon and vanilla and continue to whisk. Very gradually add sifted flour and fold gently with a rubber spatula, making sure there are no lumps.

Carefully pour batter into the foil cups, filling each one almost to the top. (This can be done up to 5 days ahead, covered and left in refrigerator.)

To ensure a molten center, bake the cakes in preheated oven 8 to 10 minutes or until edges are set but center is still soft. Cakes will not change color or rise, and the center — measuring about the size of a quarter — should jiggle. (Note: Tester needed 17 minutes, but it worked fine.)

Remove cakes from oven. Let set about 1 minute and then carefully loosen edges of foil cup and invert them onto individual serving plates.

Remove foil cup completely and serve with a scoop of Sour Cream Sorbet. Garnish with sliced bananas, mangoes, cherries or almonds, if desired.


Molten Chocolate Cakes Recipe & Video

It is not until your spoon breaks through the outer crust of this Molten Chocolate Cake, that you find its soft and creamy center. This dessert has been described as soufflé-like, cake-like, brownie-like, mousse-like, and pudding-like, and that is because it has all of these characteristics. Molten Chocolate Cakes, also known as Chocolate Lava Cakes, are wonderfully rich and chocolately. I love how the cakes rise as they bake (like a soufflé), but once they are removed from the oven they will slowly deflate.

When making these cakes you can use individual ramekins, molds, custard cups, or even muffin tins. The cakes can be served in their molds, but if you want to remove them from their cups before serving, it is important to generously butter each mold so the baked cakes release easily onto your serving plate. You may want to first run a sharp knife around each cake before unmolding. Also, the batter can be made several hours in advance of baking. Just pour the batter into the individual molds, cover each mold with plastic wrap, and refrigerate until you are ready to bake them.

Molten Chocolate Cakes: Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C) and place the oven rack in the center of the oven. Generously butter four - 6 to 8 ounce (180-240 ml) molds, ramekins, or custard cups. Dust the insides with unsweetened cocoa powder (can also use granulated white sugar). Place the prepared molds on a baking sheet.

In a heatproof bowl, placed over a saucepan of simmering water, melt the butter and chocolate. Remove from heat and set aside to cool while you beat the egg yolks.

In the bowl of your electric stand mixer, fitted with the whisk attachment, or with a hand mixer, beat the egg yolks (at room temperature) and 1/3 cup (65 grams) sugar (Sugar 1) until thick, pale, and fluffy. (When you slowly raise the beaters the batter will fall back into the bowl in a slow ribbon.) Beat in the vanilla extract and then fold in the melted chocolate mixture.

In another clean bowl, whip the egg whites (at room temperature) until frothy. Add the cream of tartar and continue to whip until soft peaks form. Gradually add the 1 tablespoon (15 grams) of granulated white sugar (Sugar 2) and whip just until stiff peaks form. With a rubber spatula or wire whisk gently fold the beaten whites into the chocolate mixture, just until incorporated. Divide the batter between the prepared molds. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until the outside edge of each cake is set, but the middles still look a little wet and wobbly. You may have cracks on the top surface of the cakes.

Immediately remove from oven and let them rest for a minute or two. You can serve the cakes in their molds or you can run an offset spatula or sharp knife around the edge of each cake and then invert onto a plate. Carefully remove the mold. If you like, you can sprinkle the tops of the cakes with confectioners sugar and place a dollop of softly whipped cream, clotted cream, or vanilla ice cream in the center of each cake.

Leftovers can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for several days. Can reheat in the microwave, or eat cold, or at room temperature.

Note: You can prepare the cakes several hours ahead of time. Simply make the recipe, pour into the prepared molds, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate. Bake directly from the refrigerator. When the batter is cold the cakes may take a minute or two longer to bake.

Makes 4 Molten Chocolate Cakes.