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The Unhealthiest Turkey Sandwiches at Chain Restaurants

The Unhealthiest Turkey Sandwiches at Chain Restaurants


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Although turkey is a staple of any healthy eating plan, many chains load their sandwiches with highly caloric toppings and sauce

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To help you avoid these pitfalls in your favorite chain restaurant menus, we’ve compiled a list of the 10 unhealthiest turkey sandwiches. The following sandwiches are high in calories and contain staggering amounts of sodium, fat, and cholesterol.

The Unhealthiest Turkey Sandwiches at Chain Restaurants

istockphoto.com

To help you avoid these pitfalls in your favorite chain restaurant menus, we’ve compiled a list of the 10 unhealthiest turkey sandwiches. The following sandwiches are high in calories and contain staggering amounts of sodium, fat, and cholesterol.

Arby’s Roast Turkey Ranch & Bacon Sandwich

Rick Diamond / Stringer / Getty Images / The Daily Meal

This sandwich features roasted turkey, peppercorn ranch sauce, cheddar cheese, and thick-cut bacon on honey wheat bread. With 2,250 mg of sodium, it contains almost an entire day’s worth of salt. But sodium isn’t the only nutrient to be wary of in this meal. The sandwich also contains 18 grams of sugar, most of which probably lie in the honey-flavored bread.

Blimpie’s Turkey Provolone Sub

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This classic contains the basics: oven-roasted turkey, provolone, tomatoes, lettuce, onion, vinegar, oil, and oregano. But simplicity doesn’t necessarily equate to clean eating. This sandwich contains 820 calories, 26 grams of fat, and 85 mg of cholesterol.

Cosi’s Turkey Stuffing Sandwich

EVA HAMBACH/AFP via Getty Images

With 1,724 mg of salt, this Thanksgiving inspired sandwich accounts for 72 percent of your daily sodium intake. Opt for an item containing less sodium, as excess amounts of salt lead to water retention. This can dramatically slow your weight loss progress.

Jersey Mike’s Chipotle Turkey Sub

ID 96541961 © Jonathan Weiss | Dreamstime.com

If you’d rather not consume nearly half of your daily calories in one meal, steer clear of this sub. Featuring roasted turkey, lettuce, tomato, and chipotle mayonnaise, it has 840 calories. It also has 12 grams of saturated fat, which is known to raise the level of LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, in the blood.

Jimmy John’s Beach Club

ID 116168931 © Georgesheldon | Dreamstime.com

There’s a reason Jimmy John’s calls its clubs giant! This sandwich contains layers upon layers of turkey breast, provolone, avocado, cucumber, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise. Weighing in at 810 calories and 42.5 grams of fat, you could easily feel satisfied after just half of this sandwich.

Panera’s Bacon Turkey Bravo Sandwich on Tomato Basil Bread

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Smoked foods tend to be high in salt. That explains why this sandwich, which features smoked turkey breast, applewood smoked bacon, and smoked Gouda cheese, contains a whopping 2,910 mg of sodium. That’s 510 mg over the daily-recommended amount!

Panera’s Sierra Turkey Sandwich on Asiago Cheese Focaccia

ID 43577945 © Sandshack33 | Dreamstime.com

At 730 calories and 27 grams of fat, this is hardly a “light” lunch option. Smoked turkey breast, field greens, red onions, and chipotle mayonnaise have this sandwich weighing in at 41 percent of your daily fat intake.

Potbelly’s Turkey BLT

ID 113404521 © Luke Wendling | Dreamstime.com

When the nutrition label tells you an item contains 2,066 milligrams of salt, or 119 percent of your daily sodium intake, you can be sure it’s not a healthy option. This medley of turkey, lettuce, and tomato also contains 92 milligrams of cholesterol, or 31 percent of your daily intake.

Quizno’s Turkey Bacon Guacamole Sandwich on Ciabatta

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Weighing in at 880 calories, this sandwich is the most caloric item on our list. This could be owed to the fact that it contains avocado, which is rich in nutrients, but happens to be high in calories. But don’t let the healthy fats fool you; this sandwich also contains 13 grams of saturated fat.

Subway’s Turkey Italiano Melt

Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images

If you’re watching your fat intake, it’s wise to stay away from this sandwich. Out of the 510 calories in the Turkey Italiano Melt, 230 come directly from fat, nine grams of which are unhealthy saturated fats.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Which is Healthier, a Tuna or a Turkey Sandwich?

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you're eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Healthy Eats' Brown-Bag Challenge has folks from around the country packing their lunches this month. Two popular brown bag items have been tuna salad sandwich and turkey sandwiches. These bad boys are going head-to-head for the title of healthiest sandwich.

Three ounces of canned tuna in water contains 108 calories and 20 grams of protein. It provides 5 percent of your daily iron needs, a multitude of energy boosting B-vitamins and 80% of your daily recommended amount of selenium. Tuna is also plentiful in omega-3 fat, which is important for heart health, growth and brain function. For the sandwich, using whole grain bread can up your daily dose of fiber as can piling up on the veggies.

The FDA suggests limiting fish consumption to twice a week to moderate the amount of mercury we take in. Certain varieties of canned tuna (i.e. albacore) are higher in mercury than others. Knowing which variety of tuna to choose is important. Three ounces of canned tuna contains 320 milligrams of sodium, which is 13 percent of the daily recommended amount.

Tuna is a healthy food. But when folks make tuna salad, they tend to go overboard on the mayo adding tons of extra calories and fat. One cup of mayo has a whopping 1440 calories, 160 grams fat, and 24 grams saturated fat. It’ll also tack on almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

Healthy Tuna Sandwich Tips:

  • Keep mayo in check. Use 1 tablespoon per person when making your tuna salad.
  • Choose the right can of tuna—chunk light in water contains less mercury than albacore.
  • 2-3 ounces of tuna is just the right portion. Pile slices of tomato, onion and lettuce to bulk up your sandwich.
  • Choose whole grain bread like whole-wheat or rye.
  • Get more tips on how to lighten up your tuna salad.

Turkey is low in fat and lower in calories than many other meats. Three ounces has about 90 calories and three grams of fat. It provides a variety of B-vitamins and the antioxidant selenium.

Deli meats are notorious for two not-so-healthy things: nitrites and sodium. Nitrites are added to deli meats to keep their color bright and help prevent bacteria growth. The problem is that nitrites have been linked to various types of cancer, especially in children and pregnant women. Deli meats also contain high amounts of sodium. Three ounces (a typical serving of deli meat) contains 42 percent of your daily recommended amount of sodium.

This relatively healthy sandwich can easily be sabotaged by piles of meat and gobs of mayo. Like to have a turkey sandwich made at the deli? They tend to pile on almost double that amount of deli meat (and sodium). Tablespoons of mayo can also add many unnecessary calories and fat to your sandwich.

Another food safety concern that has been linked to deli meat is the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. This bacteria affects the very young and old and can cause a pregnant woman to have a miscarriage during their third trimester (scary stuff!). To prevent Listeria, it's important to buy small amounts of deli meat at a time and use within 2 to 3 days. Also, don't let it hang out on the countertop during a meal, but rather take what you need and refrigerate the rest immediately. Pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meat altogether.


Watch the video: Must try sandwich recipes by Food Fusion (May 2022).