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Flavor! Napa Valley Lets You Hang Out With Celebrity Chefs in Wine Country

Flavor! Napa Valley Lets You Hang Out With Celebrity Chefs in Wine Country


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If ever there was a destination worthy of a world-class food, wine and lifestyle festival, it would be Napa, California. The very mention of this renowned wine producing area evokes savoring swoons among those who have sipped the nectar of the gods produced there.

Even more delirious with delight are those who know the history of this venerable wine area and how in 1976, the wines from some of Napa's producers upended the wine world by winning blind competitions over France's most esteemed wines. (See the movie Bottle Shock to experience firsthand, the history, serendipity, drama, and pride that this victory created.)

Yet, despite its long and illustrious reputation for excellence in the viticulture and culinary world, it has only been since 2011 that Napa has hosted its own festival, Flavor! Napa Valley Food & Wine Festival. This year, the fest takes place from November 20-24.

Having attended, one might say it was worth the wait. Taking place the week before Thanksgiving, five days and nights are devoted to the celebration of all things Napa. In one place, you have the origins of what has made the American wine scene so renowned. Imagine being in the spot where the combination of people, place and product makes for sensational synergy.


The Silverado Resort and Spa and the Culinary Institute of America are among the host venues that anchor the variety of activities to sample. There are wine seminars, cooking demonstrations, lunches, dinners, and tastings featuring some of the finest culinary and viticulture personalities around, many of whom live and work in Napa. There are one-of-a-kind opportunities to savor the regions' bounty such as a two morning tasting of Napa's most renowned and coveted wines, rare and legendary from the old and new pioneers of the region and a hands-on truffle lunch hosted by Chef Ken Frank who knows more than a trifle about truffles.
Other signature events include the opener, First Taste Napa: A Downtown Napa Tasting. This event opens Flavors by featuring the local restaurants, vintners and wine bars that make the downtown area of Napa a destination unto itself.
On Wednesday and Thursday you can immerse yourself in the culture of Napa by experiencing Terroir to Table: Farm, Cellar & Kitchen Experiences. These workshops offer an in-depth taste of what makes Napa so unique. Get into the local scene where olive oil, truffles, winemaking, cooking and lifestyle reign supreme.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Top Chef Francis Mallmann Hates Wine Pairings, Loves White Rice, and Always Travels With His Axes

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

Photo: Courtesy of Netflix / Boardwalk Pictures

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

It’s an unusually overcast Saturday morning in St. Helena, and the smoky, black fire blazing from Meadowood Napa Valley is already visible from miles away. That would normally be cause for concern, especially in these parts of Northern California, but for now it’s just another day in the kitchen for acclaimed Argentine chef Francis Mallmann.

Mallmann, known for his open-fire-style cooking as seen on the popular Netflix series Chef’s Table, is on hand to cook dinner for more than 900 guests at Auction Napa Valley, the biggest social event of the year in wine country. The annual event attracts a glamorous crowd (this year, celeb attendees included Kate Upton and Courteney Cox), Napa’s most acclaimed vintners, and mega big spenders (over $14.3 million was raised this time around, with proceeds going to children’s education and local community health nonprofits).

The dramatic scene he created on the hotel’s golf course (in which Mallmann dug a 100-by-10-foot trench in order to cook the dinner) is something out of Game of Thrones. Six domes with fires going underneath had rib eyes, chickens, and cabbages hanging from them as they roasted. There’s a thick layer of gray smoke wafting through the air and though it’s only 11:00 a.m., the aromas from the meats slowly cooking over the open fires are intense. “We started the sand pit at 4 a.m. this morning and the veggies will cook for seven hours,” said Mallmann, who was sporting his signature black beret and a bright pink chef’s jacket. “Then we started the fires at 5:00 a.m.”

After a full day of slow roasting the meats and veggies, (with the helping hands of nearly 100 chefs), dinner was ready. Mallmann took a brief break from tending to the fires to speak with us about cooking dinner for 1,000 people, wine pairings, and the one cooking tool he always travels with (and how he gets it through airport security). Plus, he shared one of his signature salsa recipes that’s perfect to top all of your grilled meats, fish, and veggies this summer.

You’re cooking dinner for quite a lot of people tonight. How long have you been preparing for this and what are the challenges involved?
Yes, we’ve been working on this for over eight months now, so quite a long time. The cooking part is easy (well, not easy, but we’ve done this many times before), the challenge is the timing and making sure it all comes out at the right temperature when it is served to the guests.


Watch the video: Flavor! Napa Valley (May 2022).