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Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish

Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish

After centuries of an ocean-centric diet, the Japanese are craving more meat

A weaker yen has made Japan’s seafood all the more enticing for importers.

Despite an overall increase in the global demand for fish, Japan’s own $11.6 billion seafood industry is forced to look to other countries for customers, as the once ocean-centric nation continues to develop a taste for meat, like beef and pork.

Over the past decade, Japanese demand for seafood has fallen 20 percent, while imports have risen 30 percent in the first half of 2015 alone, according to Bloomberg. The import industry has also been boosted by a weaker yen, which makes Japanese products cheaper than those of its competitors.

And while the rest of the world is seeking Japan’s covetable seafood — perhaps brought to the attention of many through Jiro Dreams of Sushi and the breathless praise for Japanese cuisine by Anthony Bourdain and other food celebrities — the Japanese themselves have become interested in new proteins. This year, meat consumption in Japan has exceeded that of fish for the first time since 2006, and the country has become the world’s largest importer of pork.

In order to tap into an international market, Japan’s largest air carrier, ANA, has introduced more cargo flights. “We can offer fish we catch in the morning to buyers in the afternoon of the same day,” fisherman Shigeru Koike told Bloomberg. “That’s our selling point. If we can catch more, and our cooperative managers sell more fish to overseas, that will be great.”


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


Japan’s Seafood Exports Grow as Japanese Increasingly Choose Meat Over Fish - Recipes

There is growing optimism as foodservice markets begin to reopen and demand for seafood begins to rise. However there are reports that state the market is still currently at around 50% of its pre-coved levels. Many processers are still impacted from tight margins and strict Covid-19 protocols are puts additional costs and pressures on the business.

The French ‘Agrimer’ report stated that volumes of seafood sold in auction halls in France last year were down 24% in the first 5 months of 2020, compared to the same period of 2019 last year. In particular whitefish volumes sold were down 34% from 2019. This has impacted Irish exporters of whitefish to France who report that currently local fish supplies are being favoured over the imported product. Recent data from France showed that June food service turnover is 43% lower (around 3.5 billion euros worth) than in June 2019.

In Spain the HORECA industry is seeing positive signs of recovery. Kantar data reported that in the last week of easing restrictions, which ended on the 21 st of June, out home consumption reached 70% of pre-covid lockdown levels. However according to the ‘Hostelería de Espana’ (The Spanish Horeca Business Association) it anticipated that between 20% and 30% of foodservice outlets will stay permanently closed. The Spanish market is proving to be particularly challenging for hake and megrim.

News has emerged from China that traces of Covid-19 has been found on packaging of Ecuadorian shrimp. This will have a knock on affect for all imported food coming into China but will hurt the seafood sector the most as there has been two cases of tainted seafood packaging in quick succession. As with the case with Salmon a few weeks ago, imported shrimp products have been pulled from retail and foodservice channels. This will impact Ireland’s exports of langoustines and oysters into the Chinese market. Chinese consumers are now more sensitive surrounding imported seafood and it is thought restaurants and seafood importers will suffer from these negative associations.

In Japan home meal oriented seafood products are still selling very well. Irish pelagic fish maintained a strong presence in the Japanese retail-oriented seafood distribution channels. There are reports that many in Japanese seafood trade are stepping up the pace to respond to the growing demand for products as Irish mackerel and horse mackerel which is positive. According to the Japanese Ministry of Finance, in May 2020 Japan imported 1,189MT of horse mackerel, and Ireland held 12% of share as the 4th biggest supplier. Japanese consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of food safety. Market reports confirm that Irish seafood products long established to the Japanese market are doing well amongst their mainstream


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