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New York City Teachers Union Spent Over $125K on Bagels and Pizza in 2017

New York City Teachers Union Spent Over $125K on Bagels and Pizza in 2017

The union noted some very tasty expenditures in their annual financial report

Ozgur Coskun / istockphoto.com

In 2017, a New York City teacher’s union increased its spending by $3 million to $185 million, some of which was spent on delicious carbohydrates. The New York Post reports that United Federation of Teachers (UFT) officials spent over $112,317 on bagels and $13,615 on pizza.

In addition to the bagels — which came from La Bagel Delight, just a few blocks from UFT’s Brooklyn borough office — and the pizza pie, UFT spent $6,262 on coffee and more than $5,000 on candy. Indulgences also included $1.4 million in food provided by Lackmann Culinary Services and $189,763 from Ravioli Fair caterers.

An additional $2.5 million was spent on lodging, conventions, and banquets, including $1.37 million for events at the Hilton Hotel in Midtown Manhattan, $986,128 for “retreats/training” at the Hilton Hotel in Westchester, and $5,943 at the Le Meridian in New Orleans.

The union represents approximately 185,000 members. According to their website, UFT provides professional development workshops for roughly 30,000 members annually, so the large catering budget may not be surprising.

“We are proud of every dollar we spend on services to our members and defending public education,” UFT spokesman Dick Riley told the New York Post.

For more high-expenditure eats, here are the world’s most expensive burgers, cheesesteaks, and other “cheap” dishes.


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening:


New York Today: A Renowned Chef’s Advice for Beginners

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, we have food on the brain.

And as we dust off our aprons this week, we wanted to talk to one of the city’s top chefs for our occasional series on the careers of successful New Yorkers.

It would be hard to find a more celebrated cuisinier at the moment than Daniel Humm, 41, the chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park in the Flatiron district. The restaurant has a four-star review from The Times and was awarded first place on this year’s list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, which polls international chefs and critics.

Before dinner service kicked off at Eleven Madison Park on a recent weeknight, we sat down with Mr. Humm and asked for advice from a life spent in the kitchen. (His responses have been edited down.)

How does someone get started in your field?

I think culinary school can be the right path, but only if someone comes from a background where their parents have money or they will not have student loans. Some of our best chefs never went to culinary schools.

What is the most important quality in a chef?

Passion. It’s not about talent. It’s about education, hard work and passion. In German the word for passion is “leidenschaft” and it sort of means suffering, or to enjoy suffering, or be willing to suffer for it. That’s what passion is. It’s not like a hobby. The German word says it much better: Be willing to suffer or enjoy suffering for it.

What is your best advice to newcomers?

Be patient. At first, cooking is about repetition. We do things over and over and over again, and it takes a person who enjoys that.

Be focused. New York is an amazing place, but it’s also incredibly distracting. There are so many cuisines alone. You could say, hey, I want to learn how to make pizza, or Japanese food is really cool. Or I want to learn how to make French food, or how to bake, or how to make pasta. All these things can be super distracting, and my advice is, just focus on what you want to be the best at.

Don’t jump around. Think about what you want and then pick the restaurant that fits that, and stay there for two, three or four years. When I look at chefs who stayed somewhere for a long time, I see them much more evolved.

How do you become a top chef?

Cooking is a craft. To learn a craft, it’s not about creating at first. There is a right way to do a consommé, a stock, searing meat, or making an omelet. Every great chef starts by being a great craftsman — making that perfect omelet or making that perfect roast chicken. And then at some point creativity becomes a part of it. You start from a place of rules, and then you start breaking them.

Here’s what else is happening: