New recipes

Neat, Straight Up, and On the Rocks: How to Order a Cocktail (Slideshow)

Neat, Straight Up, and On the Rocks: How to Order a Cocktail (Slideshow)

Know what you want and give your order with confidence

Todd Taulman Photography/Shutterstock

Chilled

ConstantinosZ/Shutterstock

How to order…

“I’d like a chilled Maker's Mark.”

What it means…

You’d like your shot to be cold.

Dirty

How to order…

“I’d like a dirty martini.” OR “I'd like a martini — extra dirty.”

What it means…

You’d like olive juice and olives in your martini.

Dry

How to order…

“I’d like a dry martini.”

What it means…

You’d like a martini with less vermouth.

Wet

How to order…

“I’d like a wet martini.”

What it means…

You’d like a martini with more vermouth.

Up/Straight Up

How to order…

“I’d like a vodka martini, up and with a twist.”

What it means…

You’d like your martini chilled and served with a lemon peel.

With a Twist

How to order…

“I’d like a Cosmo with an orange twist.”

What it means…

You’d like a Cosmopolitan, garnished with an orange peel.

Shaken

How to order…

“I’d like a vodka martini, shaken.”

What it means…

You’d like your cocktail shaken with ice in a cocktail shaker.

Double

Electrical Engineer/Shutterstock

How to order…

“I’d like a double Jack and Coke.” OR "Make it a double."

What it means…

You’d like twice the amount of liquor in your cocktail.

Neat

Todd Taulman Photography/Shutterstock

How to order…

“I’d like a bourbon, neat.”

What it means…

You’d like your cocktail served without ice or mixer in an Old Fashioned glass.

On the Rocks

How to order…

“I’d like a whiskey on the rocks.”

What it means…

You’d like your cocktail served with ice.

Sour

How to order…

“I’d like a whiskey sour.”

What it means…

You’d like your cocktail mixed with lemon or lime and sugar.

Frozen/Blended

How to order…

“I’d like a blended margarita with salt.”

What it means…

You’d like your margarita blended with salt on the rim of the glass.


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor


How to Drink Scotch Without Looking Like a Newbie

Why is Scotch whisky so intimidating? There's something about this spirit—which is really nothing more than malt or grain-based whisky made in Scotland—that's got an intimidating rep.

Well, once you know how to drink Scotch—and learn that it's not so scary after all—you'll be that cool, breezy bar-goer sipping Scotch like it's no biggie.

First, the basics: all Scotch whisky has to meet certain legal standards to be granted it's name. Chiefly, it must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Scotch comes in two forms, single malts (all the 100% malt whisky comes from one distillery) and blends (different single malts are blended together, often with added grain whisky). Naturally, within these two categories there are a million potential distinctions—they vary in their peaty-ness (smokiness), brininess, and heaviness. But before you start arguing about the merits of one blend over another, you've got to know how to drink Scotch the right way. Here's how it's done.

One expert way to drink Scotch: The Winterized Penicillin.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Matt Duckor