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20 Reasons I Went Back to Eating Meat

20 Reasons I Went Back to Eating Meat


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1. Having to answer the question: “Where do you get your protein?”

2. Having to answer the question: “So what do you eat, grass?”

3. Sometimes feeling like I ate grass.

4. Having to explain what soy is to people.

5. Never knowing exactly what soy is.

6. Going to cookouts. I’ll have a hamburger, hold the meat?

Photo by Olivia Wong

7. Going to BBQ restaurants. Is barbequing vegetables a thing?

8. Never having burgers.

9. Pretending to like veggie burgers.

10. Never having chicken.

11. Never having Chick-Fil-A.

12. Having to awkwardly decline meals with meat in them. I’m sure that steak is amazing but…

13. Having an Italian grandmother. Nope, I still cannot have the brisket, Mimi.

Photo by Luis Ramirez

14. People believing I’d eat meat if I was drunk enough.

15. Being asked if I was a member of PETA. I still don’t know what the acronym stands for?

16. Being jokingly told that I couldn’t eat animal crackers. Haha. This has gone too far.

17. Having to pick meat out of restaurant meals. I told you to HOLD the bacon.

18. Not eating bacon.

19. Okay I still hate bacon, but not having the option bugged me.

20. Starring at a stranger who’s eating a burger and thinking to myself, “why am I a vegetarian?”

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View the original post, 20 Reasons I Went Back to Eating Meat, on Spoon University.

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Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Not Losing Weight? 20 Possible Reasons That The Scale Is Stuck, According To A Weight-Loss Expert

At some point in your life, you may have tried to drop a few pounds but noticed your bod isn&rsquot changing in spite of all your hard weight-loss efforts. I&rsquom eating healthy! I&rsquom not snacking on chips! I walked three miles every day this week! Seriously. what gives?!

As it turns out, there are a slew of factors that affect weight loss&mdashdiet and exercise are only two of them. &ldquoIt also depends on your starting weight, your age, and your gender,&rdquo says obesity expert Matthew Weiner, MD, bariatric surgeon at Tucson Bariatric. Dr. Weiner explains that the best way to predict how much weight you can reasonably lose with basic dietary and exercise adjustments "is by calculating 10 percent of your total body weight."

For example, if you&rsquore starting weight is 150 pounds, you can expect to lose about 15 pounds at first through diet and exercise alone. Beyond that, weight loss can become a tad tougher (though not hopeless!). Your body naturally will begin to resist losing much more weight than around 10 percent thanks to its &ldquocaveman impulses,&rdquo explains Dr. Weiner. It will work to maintain your fat and energy stores to preserve your body.

Dr. Weiner notes that younger adults can sometimes lose up to 20 percent of their body weight through straightforward diet and exercise. But for postmenopausal women, for example, it might only be 5 to 7 percent.

Weight loss is also generally less speedy for women compared to men, alas. &ldquoMen do tend to lose weight faster than women, but when you look at the total amount of weight loss [over time] it&rsquos not as different as you might think,&rdquo Dr. Weiner explains. &ldquoIt might take men two to three months to lose 10 percent, while it takes women five to six months.&rdquo (*Glares.*)

Now that you understand those major physiological influencing factors, here are 20 possible behavioral reasons for why your weight just isn't changing&mdashand what you can do to overcome each one. (Psstt, you may be doing one or even a few of these!)


Watch the video: The Top 3 Arguments in Favor of Eating Meat (May 2022).