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Bishi (Armenian Zeppole)

Bishi (Armenian Zeppole)

Margie, a reader of our blog from Pennsylvania, had a special request for us — to help find a recipe her grandmother used to make. The recipe, bishi, is deep-fried dough — lighter than doughnuts, more like a crueller sprinkled with sugar.

This is a slight variation of a recipe from our cousin, Alice Bakalian.

Click here to read about how bishi is also Kim Kardashian's favorite dessert.

Notes

*Note: The frying oil can usually be reused, unless burning occurs. Allow the oil to cool, strain to remove any bits, and place the oil in a clean container with a tight-fitting lid. Store in the refrigerator.

**Note: You can also use a deep-fryer or a deep pot. If using a deep-fryer, fill with oil up to the fill line, or if there isn't one, about halfway up. If using a deep pot, fill the pot about halfway with oil. For this method, it's essential to have a deep-fat thermometer which clips to the side of the pot.

Ingredients

  • 1 packet dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 3/4 cups lukewarm water (about 105-110 degrees)
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 cups vegetable oil, for frying, or more as needed*
  • Powdered sugar, for dusting

Servings11

Calories Per Serving91

Folate equivalent (total)22µg5%


Recipe Corner: Almas Koobation’s Tukalic (Drop Cakes)

Whenever award-winning chef Jon Koobation’s beloved grandmother, Almas Koobation came to babysit them as children in Dinuba, California in the 1950s, he and his sister Marilyn would beg her to make her mouthwatering tukalic or “drop cakes.” Also known as zeppole or bishi, Jon says, “this recipe is lighter than doughnuts, and more like a cruller sprinkled with sugar. I remember standing by our stove with my sister, watching my grandmother drop the batter into the hot oil and the cakes quickly rising up. We could hardly wait for them to finish cooking, so we could enjoy them right away.”

This recipe is featured in Cooking With JON, the engaging cookbook Jon published in 2017. Jon for decades owned the celebrated Jon’s Bear Club. Under his professional direction, Jon’s Bear Club became a beloved part of the local community, and home to countless family meals and celebrations that welcomed generations of Central Valley residents.

Cooking With JON is a legacy to Jon’s diverse culinary background, and includes many of his popular signature recipes along with family photos and warm memories and anecdotes. The wealth of delicious choices and beautiful full-color photography will provide daily inspiration for meals throughout the year. Recipes include: Grandma Bazarian’s Shish Kebab, Chicken George, Lebanese Lentils and Rice, Baja Cobb Salad, JBC Crab Cakes, Braised Lamb Shanks with Bulgur Pilaf, Cabbage Dolma with Beef and Lamb, Meyer Lemon Homemade Ice Cream, and Cracked Wheat and Kale Salad. “My grandmother Almas was a very good cook, and this recipe is just one of many fond memories of my childhood. Her “drop cakes” are a perfect breakfast treat or served as a dessert with fresh berries, honey, powdered sugar and whipped cream.”


The Kardashian sisters make Armenian Pancakes

Did you ever wonder what Kim, Kourtney, and Khloe Kardashian like to cook? Apparently millions of people do. They have a family-secret recipe, Beeshee, an Armenian pancake, that they wrote about recently. But sharing the recipe with their adoring public was another matter.

Minna, an enterprising Kardashian fan, googled the word “Beeshee” but found nothing. Then she found my website, but not the recipe, so she wrote to me asking if I had a recipe for this Armenian pancake. (This was my first Kim Kardashian- related recipe request. Considering how the Kardashian’s are expressing their Armenian-ism these days, I’m surprised no one ever tried to connect them with TheArmenianKitchen.com before. This is a first!)

Minna wrote: “Hi, I was reading the Kardashian sisters were making an Armenian pancake.They called it BeeShee. Here is what Kourtney wrote maybe you can find and post the recipe as I have googled beeshee to no avail and she says she will not share the recipe as it’s a family secret.

” making my famous Armenian breakfast called Beeshee. My grandmother on my dad’s side taught me how to make it and I am the only person in our family who knows how. You have to make it the night before, let the dough rise, and then prepare it in the morning, which Khloe always does. So we do it together as a team effort haha. Because it is a bit of a process, we only make it on special occasions, and every year for Father’s Day, my dad would ask us to make him Beeshee…and of course we always did. It is so delicious and fattening! It’s basically like a thin, crispy fried pancake that you pour tons of sugar on.’ Thanks.”

I was surprised when Minna couldn’t find Beeshee (I spelled it B-i-s-h-i) on my website because I’d written about it back in November, as a request by reader Margie. After sending the recipe, Margie made it, and took photos, which we posted on the blog.

The reason Minna couldn’t find it was because I never linked the recipe name to the story. My mistake sorry!


Beeshee Pancakes

Using a standing electric mixer, mix together the flour, sugar and salt. With the machine on, slowly drizzle in 1 cup warm water. Knead until a smooth dough forms, about 5 minutes. With oiled hands, divide the dough into 8 equal balls and place on an oiled baking sheet. Cover with plastic wrap, and let the dough rest for 20 minutes.

Oil a large, clean, cool work surface. Roll out 1 dough ball into a very thin disk (8- to 9- inch diameter). Brush the dough with butter. Fold the dough into thirds, like a letter (both top third and bottom third over the middle). Then fold into thirds again from the sides, so that you end up with a small square packet (2 1/2 to 3 inches). Brush with butter and set aside. Repeat with the remaining dough balls.

Heat a griddle or large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Meanwhile, working with 1 packet at a time, gently roll out the dough into a 6-inch square. Brush with butter, place on the griddle and fry, turning once, until golden and with some lightly browned spots, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a plate, sprinkle with sugar (or drizzle with honey) and serve. Repeat with the remaining pancakes.


I love the simple zeppole that’s dusted with powdered sugar, but you can try other toppings, or add fillings to your personal taste.

Toppings ideas: Besides powdered sugar (a traditional look), you can dust with regular granulated sugar or cinnamon sugar (1/3 cup of sugar with 1 tablespoon of cinnamon). You can also dip them in melted chocolate and decorate with sprinkles.

Filling ideas: You can fill them with pastry cream, custard, or jam.


ZEPPOLE RECIPE – Zippoli Calabrese

Zeppole calabresi are divine savory fried donuts on high demand in our household! This zeppole recipe uses the traditional Calabrian method, taught to us by Nonna Maria. She has been making her family drool for these for years and while the original is with anchovies, there is a caprese surprise in store for you too. Make these fresh with your family and friends and eat them hot on a special occasion. No one will dream at stopping at one when you recreate this zeppole recipe.

INGREDIENTS:
3kg/6.6lbs plain flour
8 cups of warm water
3 sachets of dry yeast
1.5 tablespoons of salt
3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
Vegetable oil (for frying)

INGREDIENTS FOR THE FILLING:
Anchovies OR Sardines
Dry mozzarella
Cherry tomatoes
Fresh basil leaves
Small bowl with oil (for keeping your hands moist)

UTENSILS:
Extra large mixing bowl
Medium bowl
Tablespoon
Deep fryer (or medium fry pan)

METHOD:

  1. Zeppole (also known as Zippoli) are best served nice and hot, so prepare the mixture ahead of time, then fry them up on the spot for your guests!
  2. To start with, fill up a bowl with 2 cups of warm water and dissolve 1.5 tablespoons of salt by stirring them in.
  3. In a separate bowl, prepare up to 3kg/6.6lbs of plain flour.

VINCENZO’S PLATE TIP: 3kg of plain flour noted in this zeppole recipe will make around 50 or so. To make a smaller portion, start with 1kg and divide the ingredient quantities by 3.

  1. Next, pour 3 sachets of dry yeast into the warm water and stir through to dissolve before adding 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil and continuing to stir.
  2. To ensure the yeast is activated, place a flat plate over the top of the bowl with the yeast mixture and leave for at least 15-20 minutes or until bubbles have formed on the top layer.

NONNA MARIA’S TIP: To speed up this process, you can also place the bowl inside another larger one (or inside your sink) filled with hot water so that it keeps the mixture warmer which will help activate the yeast even quicker.

  1. Once the bubbles have formed, stir it again, create a small well in the middle of the flour and gently pour the mixture in.
  2. Keep a bowl of warm water next to you at all times as you will need to keep adding this to your zeppole dough.
  3. Mix through the liquid using your hands to ensure there is no dry flour left and keep gradually adding water until you get a consistency that is thick and sticky,
  4. For this zeppole recipe, each time you add water, knead the dough and turn it over so it combines really well.
  5. Once you have reached the right consistency (it will take at least 15 minutes), cover the bowl with a kitchen towel or folded tablecloth so no air is let in, leaving it for at least an hour to raise.
  6. Before you start cooking the zeppole, heat up the desired amount of vegetable oil in the fryer or saucepan to approx. 180 degrees celcius (356F).
  7. Place a small bowl with oil next to you as you will need to keep your hands moist at all times through this process.
  8. Prepare a large plate or tray with kitchen paper so you can place your zeppole inside and this can absorb any excess oil.
  9. Remove the cover from the dough and moisten your hands using the oil.
  10. Pull up a piece of dough and roughly flatten it out on the palm of your hand. Take an anchovy (sardine or your desired filing), place it in the middle and then fold the dough over, and twist it on both ends gently to encase the anchovy, making sure there are no holes and that the dough is not too thin around the filling.
  11. Place it into the fryer/saucepan, and add a few more without overcrowding them. Using a long set of tongs, tap the zippoli to turn them over and once they are completely golden, they’re ready!
  12. Remove them from the oil, place them onto your plate or tray and serve.
  13. Repeat until the dough is finished.
  14. You can even make this zeppole recipe plain with no feeling, or leave some dough until dessert time and dip plain ones in honey and cinnamon!

HOW TO SERVE:
Immediately! There are no arguments that zeppole taste best when eaten HOT, but you can also prepare them ahead of time and warm them up in the oven.

If you love Fried Food you should also try Nonna Fried Pizza alongside a nice glass of Campari Prosecco Cocktail.

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The Rhubarb Fool

This is the latest breakfast in our family project to prepare and eat a breakfast from every country in the world in alphabetical order. The highlight was without doubt these plaited brioche-type breads called Choereg or Choreg which are in fact very simple to make once your plaiting technique is sorted out. As a little girl I had long hair often plaited so this was no problem.

What do I know about Armenia? Very little. “A landlocked country with Turkey to the West and Georgia to the North, Armenia boasts striking scenery with high mountains and caves, lakes and hot springs”. So says the BBC News website, along with a few other key facts: capital city Yerevan population 3.1 million land area 11,484 sq miles (ed: about twice the size of the English county of Yorkshire) major religion Christianity.

Armenia has a huge diaspora and famous Armenians or people of Armenian descent can be found all over the world: the composer Aram Khachaturian (whose Spartacus theme was used as the opening music for BBC TV series The Onedin Line) and singers Charles Aznavour and Cher are just a few examples.

This means too that there are many Armenians in Europe and the US wanting to recreate a taste of home, communicating with one another and sharing recipes which conjure up a taste of the homeland. Luckily for me, Armenian recipes are relatively easy to come by on the web,

I started my research with a visit to a Manchester institution, The Armenian Taverna which for as long as most people can remember has occupied discreet basement premises in Albert Square. It looks as if I was in the nick of time as, sadly, the restaurant went on the market last month.

Owner Mafif Alamyan (reputed to be a former Olympic wrestler) was most helpful when describing typical Armenian breakfast dishes. Eggs, tomatoes and cheese featured on his list as did Armenian bread. It was in describing the fruit of Armenia, both fresh and preserved as jam, that he became almost lyrical – he talked of green walnut jam, apricots (the Latin name for the apricot is after all Prunus armeniaca) , cherries and especially mulberries. I recommend a visit to the Armenian Taverna before it vanishes for ever http://www.armeniantaverna.co.uk/

Now I needed to flesh out Mr Alamyan’s guidance with some recipes. First stop was

http://www.thearmeniankitchen.com a vast repository of Armenian food and memories compiled by the Kalajian family now living in the US. Here I found a description of egg scrambled with tomatoes which seemed to fit the bill for a simple breakfast dish – so simple it doesn’t need a recipe, just Mr Kalajian’s simple instructions. “You cut up a tomato as chunky or delicate as you like and stir it into your eggs as you scramble them. Add salt and pepper and eat with bread”.

The next challenge was to try and locate mulberry jam. This could be tricky. The only mulberry tree I know of is Milton’s (so called because the poet sat and composed under its shade) in the Fellows’ Garden at Christ’s College in Cambridge. No way was I going to get permission to gather mulberries from there very easily. There had to be another way. Sadly I couldn’t find anyone selling mulberry jam made in the UK but specialist deli Mortimer & Bennett came up with the goods – a middle eastern mulberry jam made in the Lebanon. This would do nicely. Mortimer & Bennett are based in Turnham Green, West London and have a wide range of delectable and out of the ordinary deli items. They sell via their website as well as from the shop and I can vouch that they provide an efficient and personal service. My package of goodies (I just had to buy some oils and chocolate too as they offer free shipping if your order is £50 or more) arrived safe and sound a few days after ordering. Here’s the jam complete with rustic hessian lid cover:

OK so the jam was now sorted so now for the bread. I found three Armenian bread/pastry recipes suitable for breakfast, the first Bishi (sometimes spelt BeeShee, sometimes also called Zeppole), a kind of doughnut, the second Keta, a walnut-stuffed Danish-type pastry and the third Choereg, a plaited sesame sprinked loaf enriched with eggs and butter (also spelt choreg and I reckon its similar to the Greek tsoureki too).

To make the most of the carefully sourced mulberry jam, I opted to make the plainest of the three breads, the choereg choosing a straightforward recipe contributed by Ani from Montreal which I found on Allrecipes.com. I give the recipe below but I did reduce the fat content of the recipe to just 8oz from the 1lb specified, similarly I used 4 eggs rather 5 – it still turned out spectacularly well.

A word on mahleb – this is a middle eastern spice made from the kernel of a special variety of cherry. I’d already started the recipe when I noticed this little bombshell in the list of ingredients so didn’t even attempt to track some down so added a slug of Amaretto and another one of Kirsch to try and provide the required almondy cherry flavours.

Recipe for Choereg – Armenian sweet plaited bread

1 cup whole milk (8 fl oz)
1 cup butter (8 oz or 225g)
1 cup white sugar (8 oz or 225g)
1/2 cup lukewarm water (4 fl oz or 120ml)
2 teaspoons white sugar
2 (.25 ounce) envelopes easyblend dry yeast
4 eggs (plus more beaten egg for glazing)
6 cups all-purpose flour plus more if required to obtain the right dough consistency (840g or 1 lb 14 oz) – I used a mixture of strong and ordinary plain white flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 tablespoons ground mahleb (see note above)
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

In a saucepan over medium heat, combine the milk and butter. Heat until butter is melted, but do not let it boil. Stir in 1 cup of sugar until dissolved, then set aside to cool to lukewarm. Crack the eggs into a large bowl, and stir a little to break up the yolks. Slowly pour in the heated milk mixture while whisking constantly, so as to temper the eggs and not cook them.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, sachets of easyblend yeast, baking powder, mahleb, and salt. Make a well in the centre, and pour in the wet mixture. Stir until it forms a sticky dough. Pour onto a floured surface, and knead in additional flour as needed to make a more substantial dough. Knead for about 10 minutes. Place in an oiled bowl, and set in a warm place to rise for about 2 hours, or until doubled in size.

When the dough has doubled, punch down again, and let rise until doubled. It will only take about half as long this time.

Separate the dough into 5 even portions, then separate each of those into thirds. Roll each of those into ropes about 12 inches long. Plait sets of three ropes together, pinching the ends to seal, and tucking them under for a better presentation. Place the loaves onto baking sheets. Loaves should be spaced 4 inches apart. Set in a warm place to rise until your finger leaves an impression behind when you poke the loaf gently.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Brush the loaves with beaten egg, and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
Bake for 25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until nicely golden brown all over.


The Rhubarb Fool

This is the latest breakfast in our family project to prepare and eat a breakfast from every country in the world in alphabetical order. The highlight was without doubt these plaited brioche-type breads called Choereg or Choreg which are in fact very simple to make once your plaiting technique is sorted out. As a little girl I had long hair often plaited so this was no problem.

What do I know about Armenia? Very little. “A landlocked country with Turkey to the West and Georgia to the North, Armenia boasts striking scenery with high mountains and caves, lakes and hot springs”. So says the BBC News website, along with a few other key facts: capital city Yerevan population 3.1 million land area 11,484 sq miles (ed: about twice the size of the English county of Yorkshire) major religion Christianity.

Armenia has a huge diaspora and famous Armenians or people of Armenian descent can be found all over the world: the composer Aram Khachaturian (whose Spartacus theme was used as the opening music for BBC TV series The Onedin Line) and singers Charles Aznavour and Cher are just a few examples.

This means too that there are many Armenians in Europe and the US wanting to recreate a taste of home, communicating with one another and sharing recipes which conjure up a taste of the homeland. Luckily for me, Armenian recipes are relatively easy to come by on the web,

I started my research with a visit to a Manchester institution, The Armenian Taverna which for as long as most people can remember has occupied discreet basement premises in Albert Square. It looks as if I was in the nick of time as, sadly, the restaurant went on the market last month.

Owner Mafif Alamyan (reputed to be a former Olympic wrestler) was most helpful when describing typical Armenian breakfast dishes. Eggs, tomatoes and cheese featured on his list as did Armenian bread. It was in describing the fruit of Armenia, both fresh and preserved as jam, that he became almost lyrical – he talked of green walnut jam, apricots (the Latin name for the apricot is after all Prunus armeniaca) , cherries and especially mulberries. I recommend a visit to the Armenian Taverna before it vanishes for ever http://www.armeniantaverna.co.uk/

Now I needed to flesh out Mr Alamyan’s guidance with some recipes. First stop was

http://www.thearmeniankitchen.com a vast repository of Armenian food and memories compiled by the Kalajian family now living in the US. Here I found a description of egg scrambled with tomatoes which seemed to fit the bill for a simple breakfast dish – so simple it doesn’t need a recipe, just Mr Kalajian’s simple instructions. “You cut up a tomato as chunky or delicate as you like and stir it into your eggs as you scramble them. Add salt and pepper and eat with bread”.

The next challenge was to try and locate mulberry jam. This could be tricky. The only mulberry tree I know of is Milton’s (so called because the poet sat and composed under its shade) in the Fellows’ Garden at Christ’s College in Cambridge. No way was I going to get permission to gather mulberries from there very easily. There had to be another way. Sadly I couldn’t find anyone selling mulberry jam made in the UK but specialist deli Mortimer & Bennett came up with the goods – a middle eastern mulberry jam made in the Lebanon. This would do nicely. Mortimer & Bennett are based in Turnham Green, West London and have a wide range of delectable and out of the ordinary deli items. They sell via their website as well as from the shop and I can vouch that they provide an efficient and personal service. My package of goodies (I just had to buy some oils and chocolate too as they offer free shipping if your order is £50 or more) arrived safe and sound a few days after ordering. Here’s the jam complete with rustic hessian lid cover:

OK so the jam was now sorted so now for the bread. I found three Armenian bread/pastry recipes suitable for breakfast, the first Bishi (sometimes spelt BeeShee, sometimes also called Zeppole), a kind of doughnut, the second Keta, a walnut-stuffed Danish-type pastry and the third Choereg, a plaited sesame sprinked loaf enriched with eggs and butter (also spelt choreg and I reckon its similar to the Greek tsoureki too).

To make the most of the carefully sourced mulberry jam, I opted to make the plainest of the three breads, the choereg choosing a straightforward recipe contributed by Ani from Montreal which I found on Allrecipes.com. I give the recipe below but I did reduce the fat content of the recipe to just 8oz from the 1lb specified, similarly I used 4 eggs rather 5 – it still turned out spectacularly well.

A word on mahleb – this is a middle eastern spice made from the kernel of a special variety of cherry. I’d already started the recipe when I noticed this little bombshell in the list of ingredients so didn’t even attempt to track some down so added a slug of Amaretto and another one of Kirsch to try and provide the required almondy cherry flavours.

Recipe for Choereg – Armenian sweet plaited bread

1 cup whole milk (8 fl oz)
1 cup butter (8 oz or 225g)
1 cup white sugar (8 oz or 225g)
1/2 cup lukewarm water (4 fl oz or 120ml)
2 teaspoons white sugar
2 (.25 ounce) envelopes easyblend dry yeast
4 eggs (plus more beaten egg for glazing)
6 cups all-purpose flour plus more if required to obtain the right dough consistency (840g or 1 lb 14 oz) – I used a mixture of strong and ordinary plain white flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 tablespoons ground mahleb (see note above)
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

In a saucepan over medium heat, combine the milk and butter. Heat until butter is melted, but do not let it boil. Stir in 1 cup of sugar until dissolved, then set aside to cool to lukewarm. Crack the eggs into a large bowl, and stir a little to break up the yolks. Slowly pour in the heated milk mixture while whisking constantly, so as to temper the eggs and not cook them.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, sachets of easyblend yeast, baking powder, mahleb, and salt. Make a well in the centre, and pour in the wet mixture. Stir until it forms a sticky dough. Pour onto a floured surface, and knead in additional flour as needed to make a more substantial dough. Knead for about 10 minutes. Place in an oiled bowl, and set in a warm place to rise for about 2 hours, or until doubled in size.

When the dough has doubled, punch down again, and let rise until doubled. It will only take about half as long this time.

Separate the dough into 5 even portions, then separate each of those into thirds. Roll each of those into ropes about 12 inches long. Plait sets of three ropes together, pinching the ends to seal, and tucking them under for a better presentation. Place the loaves onto baking sheets. Loaves should be spaced 4 inches apart. Set in a warm place to rise until your finger leaves an impression behind when you poke the loaf gently.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Brush the loaves with beaten egg, and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
Bake for 25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until nicely golden brown all over.


South Beach Diät, In drei Schritten zum Wohlfühlgewicht

Trend Diäten

Wieder eine Sensations-Diät aus den USA &ndash die South Beach Diät. Wir nehmen sie unter die Lupe und verraten, welche Vor- und Nachteile hinter dem sonnigen Schlankheits-Versprechen stehen. Die.


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Watch the video: KUWTK. Kourtney Kardashian Fails at Making Bishi. E! (December 2021).