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Rainbow Chard, Fava Beans, Artichokes, and More: The Definitive Guide to Spring Produce

Rainbow Chard, Fava Beans, Artichokes, and More: The Definitive Guide to Spring Produce

Spring produce is a welcomed sight after a cold winter

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Rainbow Chard, Fava Beans, Artichokes, and More: The Definitive Guide to Spring Produce

Rainbow Chard, Fava Beans, Artichokes, and More: The Definitive Guide to Spring Produce

It’s is time to say goodbye to winter squash, citrus, and Brussels sprouts. While we welcomed roasted Brussels and warming squash soups at the start of winter, these offerings have begun to ring a little repetitive. Thankfully, spring produce is bursting from the ground and off the trees to brighten our plates and palates with seasonal offerings like pungent ramps, verdant greens, and sweet peas.

These new textures and colors are sure to inspire you in the kitchen, so pack away winter’s preserved, canned goods for another time, and head to the farmers market with your baskets ready to accept colorful vegetables, tender leaves, and the spring harvest’s sweet fruit.

Consider fresh, nutrient-packed seasonal foods to help you combat springtime allergies, clean up your diet, and to support your local farmers.

To help you along your way this spring, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite spring produces along with inspiring recipes, cooking advice, and helpful shopping tips so you can be sure to bring home only the best quality spring produce available.

Artichokes

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This might sound a little strange, but to test for the best artichoke, give them a squeeze. If you hear a squeak, then you know you’ve found a ripe one. Artichokes are great for your cholesterol, they’re also high in fiber and potassium. You can steam your artichoke whole and nosh on the leaves, or use just the hearts for dishes, like deep-fried artichoke hearts, sautéed in pasta, or blended into an artichoke dip.

For our Artichokes recipe collection, click here.

Arugula

Peppery arugula is a welcomed sight after a long winter of kale, kale, and more kale. The warmer weather will make your dark green kale turn bitter, but tender arugula is the perfect substitute. Look for bright green leaves, yellowing is a sign that your arugula is a little past its prime. Serve in a simple salad, packed into a panini, or sautéed with your favorite pasta toss.

For our Arugula recipe collection, click here.

Asparagus

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Asparagus really are a versatile vegetable — grilled, steamed, sautéed, fried, and even raw — asparagus add color, texture, and a mild flavor to your plate. Look for bright green spears — violet-tinged spears are OK too — and just like artichokes, when the bunch is squeezed you should hear a squeak.

For our Asparagus recipe collection, click here.

Beets

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Red, yellow, or orange, beets add sweetness to dishes and pair well with bright, citrusy vinaigrettes. Look for small to medium-sized, unblemished beets with a firm, smooth skin. Beet greens are also a wonderful indicator of your beets freshness. The foliage can be sautéed and served with a squeeze of lemon juice.

For our Beets recipe collection, click here.

Bok Choy

Carrots

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Young spring carrots are tender and sweeter than during the winter. Save the green fronds for pesto or a cold carrot-top soup. Nosh on crunchy carrots for a healthy snack, roast them as a side dish for dinner, or slice them into thin ribbons and serve raw in salad.

For our Carrots recipe collection, click here.

Fava Beans

Leeks

Spring leeks have a mild onion flavor. Look for firm, bright green stalks. Leeks are at peak flavor from March to April, so stock up on this delicious spring vegetable for flavoring soups, adding to stir-fries, and reinforcing stocks.

For our Leeks recipe collection, click here.

Peas

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If your only experience with peas starts with a can opener, forget everything you’ve tasted before. Fresh spring peas are sweet with a snappy texture — they’re anything but mushy. Serve fresh in salads, sautéed for a side dish, or cold in chilled spring soup.

For our Peas recipe collection, click here.

Potatoes

Potatoes are one of those vegetables we see year round, but early spring and summer yields “new potatoes:” basically any potato harvested early in the season. They tend to be waxier and higher in moisture than baking potatoes, so you can cook these thin-skinned potatoes with that nutritious skin. Look for potatoes that are firm and blemish-free.

For our Potatoes recipe collection, click here.

Radishes

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Winter radishes, like daikon, watermelon, and black radishes, may be gone for now, but their smaller, brightly colored relatives, like white hailstone, purple plum, and cherry belle, are here to add a spicy zing to salads, enjoyed raw with a sprinkling of za’tar or roasted as a side dish with dinner.

For our Radishes recipe collection, click here.

Rainbow Chard

Ramps

A spring forager’s favorite. Ramps are a kind of wild leek that has a mild onion flavor. The aesthetics of the ramp, fading from white to red to green, make for a beautiful addition to any plate. Pickle, fry, or pulverize into a pesto. Ramps are the perfect combination of pungent garlic and onion for springtime dining.

For our Ramps recipe collection, click here.

Rhubarb

Only the stalk of the rhubarb plant is edible, and it resembles a red celery stalk, but the texture is much more velvety, and the flavor is lip-puckeringly tart. More often baked into pies or cooked down for syrup than used for savory preparations, rhubarb is also delicious when lightly seasoned and braised. Look for bright, glossy, firm stalks. The deeper red it is, the sweeter the rhubarb.

For our Rhubarb recipe collection, click here.

Scallions

Often confused with spring onions, which have a small onion bulb, scallions are picked before the onion bulb begins to form or are grown from non-bulb forming onion varieties. They tend to be milder and sweeter in flavor. Both the whites and the greens are edible and can be eaten raw or cooked. Look for firm stems and bright color.

For our Scallions recipe collection, click here.

Spinach

Spinach is the most delicate and tender during the spring. Bright green leaves packed with iron and calcium makes them a healthy choice for your spring salad mix. The greens themselves have a mild sweetness to them, balanced with just a hint of acidity. Look for crisp, dark green leaves that haven’t been crushed.

For our Spinach recipe collection, click here.

Spring Garlic

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16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.


16 Foods That Taste Better in Spring (and How to Use Them)

From salmon to kale to avocado to sweet potatoes, there are some foods that have probably earned a spot in your kitchen year-round. But others might only make a brief—albeit delicious—seasonal appearance. Now that things are (finally!) starting to warm up, it’s time to trade in your winter meal workhorses for lighter spring choices. Next time you hit the market, add these warmer-weather fruits, vegetables, and cooking staples to your basket. And hurry up! Some of them might be gone again before it’s warm enough to wear your shorts and sandals.

1. Baby Artichokes

They’re sweeter than full-size artichokes, and because you don’t have to remove the tough inner choke, the entire thing is edible. (So they’re way easier to prep. All you have to do is remove the tough outer leaves, and you’re good to go.)Spring Recipe Idea: Have warm braised baby artichokes as a side for chicken or fish, or add them to a salad like this warm braised baby artichoke salad with white beans and manchego.

2. Fresh Berries

Now’s the time of year when strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries start tasting juicy and flavorful, instead of like cardboard. So stock up!Spring Recipe Idea: Make the most of their sweet tartness by pairing them with richer, creamier ingredients like goat cheese. Scaling Back’s blackberry fennel pizza with goat cheese would make an insanely good spring dinner.

3. New Potatoes

The small, waxy spuds are firmer and less starchy than larger Russett or Yukon Gold potatoes, so they hold up especially well in salads… and we know you’re going to start craving more salads.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of the usual gloppy, mayo-laden potato salad, try this French potato salad with green beans and egg from Leite’s Culinaria. It’s lighter, and the olive oil-based dressing means you can leave it sitting out at your picnic. (Pro tip: Toss the potatoes with the dressing while they’re still warm, so they absorb more of the dressing flavor.)

4. Tender Lettuces

You might think of salad as a hot-weather food, but lettuces actually grow best when the weather is still on the cooler side. That’s why spring is the best time to enjoy sweet, tender greens like butter lettuce, Bibb lettuce, mache, and watercress.Spring Recipe Idea: Try them in a bright, clean salad, like Feasting at Home’s watercress and citrus salad with turmeric dressing.

5. Fava Beans

Fresh fava beans are pretty much exclusive to springtime—so if you spot them at your market, scoop them up. Prepping them takes a little bit of work—you have to remove the beans from their pods and slip the tough outer skin off each bean. But the rich, buttery flavor is worth it.Spring Recipe Idea: Try smashing fava beans on toast and topping them with a poached egg, like Tiny Inklings does it.

6. Asparagus

Sure, you can get asparagus year-round. But you’ll find the thinnest, sweetest, most tender stalks in the springtime (and they won’t cost an arm and a leg).Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of roasting or steaming the whole stalks, try something different. Shave asparagus into noodle-like strands and top them with creamy ricotta and chopped pistachio, like this Platings and Pairings recipe.

7. Dill

There’s nothing like fresh herbs for springtime cooking. This fern-like herb’s fresh, sweet flavor makes any dish feel lighter.Spring Recipe Idea: Toss coarsely chopped dill leaves into a salad or use dill to add brightness in cooked dishes. We are so making this roasted carrots with feta and dill dish from Neighbor Food.

8. Chives

Spring is all about mild, delicate flavors—and that’s exactly what you’ll get from chives, which are slightly onion-y without being overpowering.Spring Recipe Idea: They’re especially great with eggs. At your next breakfast, make this swiss chard potato chive frittata from The Foodie Dietitian to get your dose of chives.

9. Mint

You might’ve passed on icy mint over the winter. But now that the weather’s warming up, the cooling flavor feels just right.Spring Recipe Idea: For a burst of freshness, try adding whole mint leaves to spring rolls—like Cocoon Cooks’s rainbow spring rolls with mango, basil, and lime tahini cream.

10. Parsley

This garnish might be available year-round, but the fresh grass-like herb is especially welcome in spring. DIY tip: If you plant your own parsley (bonus points to you), plant them 3-4 weeks before the last spring frost, so when the warm spring weather hits, you’ll have parsley readily available in your garden or pot.Spring Recipe Idea: Try trading in the usual basil for parsley in pesto. It’s delicious on grain and veggie bowls, like Scaling Back’s super vegan bowl with parsley cashew pesto.

11. Bee Pollen

The jury’s still out on whether bee pollen will actually help your seasonal allergy symptoms, but hey, it can’t hurt to try, right? There’s no question that its light, floral flavor livens up spring desserts.Spring Recipe Idea: Try it in homemade frozen yogurt, like Kitchen McCabe’s salted honey chamomile frozen yogurt.

12. Arborio Rice

You can obviously get this any time of year, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s an essential component in spring risotto. Even if your pantry is usually stocked with whole grains, it’s worth making an exception for white Arborio rice. The high starch content is what makes risotto so rich and velvety.Spring Recipe Idea: Try this sweet, creamy spring pea risotto from What’s Gaby Cooking.

13. Chickpeas

Spring means you’re probably spending more time outside—and less time in the kitchen. (Hello, after-work bike rides and frisbee!) Having a few cans of chickpeas on hand means you always have a nutritious, no-cook protein source ready for fast meals.Spring Recipe Idea: Instead of tossing them in the usual salad, try making Vanilla and Bean’s smashed chickpea salad sandwich.

14. Frozen Fruit

Now that it’s warming up, you might be more likely to crave a frosty smoothie or smoothie bowl. Save the delicate fresh berries for cooking and use frozen berries in your blended drinks instead. They’re less expensive, but they’re just as delicious. Plus, they’ll stay good in your freezer all season long.Spring Recipe Idea: Blissful Basil’s cosmic strawberry ginger peach bliss bowl is a dream for breakfast or dessert.

15. Buttermilk

Buttermilk sounds so wintry, right? But it made our list because it’s a key ingredient in homemade herby dressings and dips. Plus, real buttermilk is a fermented food, so it’s a great source of probiotics. (Look for buttermilk made with live active cultures, like lactococcus lactis or leuconostoc cremoris.)Spring Recipe Idea: The Gracious Pantry’s clean-eating ranch dressing is made with buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and loads of fresh herbs.