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Vice’s ‘Munchies’ Announces its First Cookbook

Vice’s ‘Munchies’ Announces its First Cookbook

The cookbook is set to release in the fall

The cookbook will touch upon everything from tortillas to “morning after” hangover recipes.

Vice’s video series, Chef’s Night Out, gives you a little taste of the lives of professionals in the culinary industry around the country and world. Recently, the publication revealed that its food and culture site, Munchies, is releasing its very first cookbook, MUNCHIES: Late-Night Meals from the World's Best Chefs, based off of the series.

According to the press release, the cookbook will be a collection of 65 stories and recipes from big names in the food industry, including Anthony Bourdain, Dominique Crenn, David Chang, and more.

"I'm beyond excited to be publishing our first cookbook, which is inspired by moments from the show that launched our website,” Helen Hollyman, Editor-in-Chief of Munchies, said in a statement. “This cookbook makes you feel like the Dream Team got together to throw the greatest culinary evening of your life and even anticipated your morning after cravings.”

The cookbook is the first of a three-part set by Ten Speed Press.


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”


American Experience

The Great War changed America’s role in the world. At home, it also changed how Americans ate. When Wilson declared war in 1917, the cookbook industry — as well as local clubs and newspapers — immediately fell in line. Wartime editions were rushed into print. Herbert Hoover’s new Food Administration, meanwhile, issued guidelines and announced themed days of the week: Mondays were meatless, Wednesdays wheatless… Certain foods, like sugar, wheat, meats, and fats, were urgently needed for the front and for Allied civilian populations. “It became evident that food was going to be a weapon in the war,” says Helen Veit, an interviewee in The Great War and a leading food historian. “Hebert Hoover immediately worked to get Americans to think that saving food and conserving food was the most important thing that they could do as individuals.”

We’ve scoured more than a dozen World War I “victory cookbooks” and read hundreds of recipes from around the country to bring you a week’s worth of historical dishes. All of them meet Food Administration guidelines. Set your tables back to 1917 and make sure to share your victory meals with us using #GreatWarPBS on Instagram and Twitter.

Remember, as a victory cookbook explained in 1918: “Don’t give the new dishes a black eye by having too many of them at once. Use all the ingenuity you have to make them both taste and look well. Food habits, like other habits, are not easily changed. Lead gently into the new realm.”