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Beer Review: Prairie Artisan Ales Standard

Beer Review: Prairie Artisan Ales Standard

Welcome Prairie Artisan Ales to the fold of adventurous craft brewers. The Tulsa, Okla., duo of gypsy-brewing brothers simply "wanted to do something awesome," so they launched a beer brand. A Kickstarter campaign to build their own, barrel-aged only brewery was recently very successful (more than $23,000 pledged toward a $10,000 goal), so the roaming brewers will soon have a home base.

Prairie ales are already distributed by Shelton Brothers of Belchertown, Mass., however, a diverse set of brews with distinct, rustic flavors matched by equally distinct and colorful label art. We recently tried Prairie Artisan Standard, a low-ABV, hoppy farmhouse ale suitable for "everyday drinking."

Poured from a stubnose 12-ounce bottle into a tulip, Standard appears golden yellow in the glass. The aroma is of lightly toasted bread and citrusy hops, creating a very pleasant and intriguing nose. First taste on the tongue is of spicy lime, probably from the Motueka hops, a variety from New Zealand known for this unique flavor.

As anticipated, the brew is very refreshing and easy to sip at only 5.2 percent ABV. Standard is a nice rendition of the traditional style that has been brewed by farmers — not brewers — on Belgium’s country farms for centuries. However, the use of fresh, citrusy, hops gives this classic style a distinctly American, hop-forward flavor.

Prairie Artisan Ales is a very promising new addition to the scene, and with the exposure Shelton Brothers distribution provides, their name should quickly become well-known. We’re looking forward to tasting the many barrel aged brews that will come from the new brewery, earning a spot in distribution alongside their more straightforward ales.

— Mike Lorenz, The Drink Nation

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10 Ways Beer is Like The Force
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Zane Kirkhope

Dark Farmhouse Ale Recipe : Saddlebock Brewery - Arkansas Farmhouse Ale | Brewery . . This is an introduction to ancient homebrewed farmhouse ales of northern europe. Used spring water for the mash and sparge. Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Filter through a sieve lined with a coffee filter. The bjcp style guide says:

Farmhouse ale this other seasonal release (wy3726) is a close cousin to the dupont strain, with a supposed origin at brasserie de blaugies. That, it turns out, isn't actually a problem. In raw ale, this doesn't happen. The recipe structure is similar o the other two books in the series. The term farmhouse ale is an overarching classification, encompassing and unifying many unique substyles of beers, including funky styles like saison, sahti, gotlandsdricka, biere de garde, and others.

Dark Arts Plum Sour Saison - Saison / Farmhouse Ale - Cold . from cdn.justwineapp.com Like wild brews many of the recipes have built in options and ranges suggested for altering the recipe. That, it turns out, isn't actually a problem. Here is everything you need to know. In his homebrewing in switzerland adventures, ian hoke focuses on styles he can't buy there, including farmhouse ales such as this one. Mash out at 168° f (76° c). Farmhouse brewers don't learn brewing by reading textbooks or taking courses. Add the roasted barley extract to the wort at the start of the boil. Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.

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Apart from the difference in the flavor, farmhouse brewers are mostly unaware of all this. The hops are just east kent goldings , these are a hop i love and fit perfectly both in terms of what would have originally been used by farmhouse brewers and to the style and flavour of. Farmhouse ale this other seasonal release (wy3726) is a close cousin to the dupont strain, with a supposed origin at brasserie de blaugies. For more practical brewing tips, see my guides brewing with juniper, spruce, fir and pine, guide to kveik and other farmhouse yeast, and raw ale brewing techniques and recipes. Belle saison is a diastaticus strain that allows the brewers to achieve the high attenuation characteristic of this classic style. Make your best dark saison. Koduõlu in estonia, gotlandsdricke in sweden, maltøl in norway and kaimiškas in lithuania. Recipe developed by kevin eichelberger, red eye brewing co., wausau, wisconsin, summer 2009. Jester king brewery figlet farmhouse amber ale. Another summer wheat, but changed up the recipe a bit. And guess what, it is pretty awesome. The recipe structure is similar o the other two books in the series. Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer.

Koduõlu in estonia, gotlandsdricke in sweden, maltøl in norway and kaimiškas in lithuania. Saison saison is a very flavorful belgian farmhouse ale with some unique characteristics. Mash out at 168° f (76° c). Luckily the ale apothecary in bend, oregon answered my collaboration call. Apart from the difference in the flavor, farmhouse brewers are mostly unaware of all this.

Daily Beer Review: Bam Noire Dark Farmhouse Ale from 3.bp.blogspot.com Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer. Sahti is a very process driven beer, and the old techniques are the key to success. Like wild brews many of the recipes have built in options and ranges suggested for altering the recipe. Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add the roasted barley extract to the wort at the start of the boil. Swapping the tropical fruity notes of french saison or saison ii for heavier banana, it provides a classic dry peppery saison character, and is again easier to work with than dupont. More cowbell farmhouse ale recipe. The farmhouse ale is a misunderstood style of beer, and that's because it's not a style, but more of a lifestyle beer.

This dry farmhouse ale called figlet is a real texas gem!

High fruitiness with low to moderate hop aroma and moderate to no herb, spice and alcohol aroma. The did the same thing with winter. Dark winter saison recipe iv. Farmhouse ale this other seasonal release (wy3726) is a close cousin to the dupont strain, with a supposed origin at brasserie de blaugies. The term farmhouse ale is an overarching classification, encompassing and unifying many unique substyles of beers, including funky styles like saison, sahti, gotlandsdricka, biere de garde, and others. Recipe developed by kevin eichelberger, red eye brewing co., wausau, wisconsin, summer 2009. Filter through a sieve lined with a coffee filter. Farmhouse ales covers a few variations on each style, for eight recipes total. Mash grains at 153° f (67° c) for one hour. This collaboration brew is a fine example of how sahti can be brewed far away from its origins. 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped It just means that raw ale gets a recognizably different flavor profile from boiled beer. Apart from the difference in the flavor, farmhouse brewers are mostly unaware of all this.

Recipe developed by kevin eichelberger, red eye brewing co., wausau, wisconsin, summer 2009. Dark saison is, well, dark, but it also still features a complex and dry flavor profile, high carbonation, and a penchant for creative ingredient use that we've come to expect from artisanal, farmhouse styles. Add the roasted barley extract to the wort at the start of the boil. Farmhouse brewers don't learn brewing by reading textbooks or taking courses. More cowbell farmhouse ale recipe.

Prairie Artisan Ales: Standard | Farmhouse ale, Ale, Craft . from i.pinimg.com Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer. Farmhouse beers would be made primarily with ingredients available on the farm or very close by so it makes sense the recipe would be a few simple ingredients. The farmhouse ale is a misunderstood style of beer, and that's because it's not a style, but more of a lifestyle beer. Filter through a sieve lined with a coffee filter. Dark winter saison recipe iv. Sahti is a very process driven beer, and the old techniques are the key to success. The term farmhouse ale is an overarching classification, encompassing and unifying many unique substyles of beers, including funky styles like saison, sahti, gotlandsdricka, biere de garde, and others. I had already interviewed the ale apothecary's founder paul arney for the viking age brew and i knew his interest in nordic farmhouse ales.

Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer.

Filter through a sieve lined with a coffee filter. More cowbell farmhouse ale recipe. Sparge with 168° f (76° c) water to collect 7 gallons. And guess what, it is pretty awesome. In reality, farmhouse ale refers to a much more comprehensive range of beers, styles, and geographic regions. Mash grains at 153° f (67° c) for one hour. 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped Finnish sahti is the best known of them, but similar beers exist in the nordic and baltic countries: Phil markowski's widely popular and influential 2004 book farmhouse ales helped make the term common in craft beer. Saison saison is a very flavorful belgian farmhouse ale with some unique characteristics. The farmhouse ale is a misunderstood style of beer, and that's because it's not a style, but more of a lifestyle beer. Swapping the tropical fruity notes of french saison or saison ii for heavier banana, it provides a classic dry peppery saison character, and is again easier to work with than dupont. High fruitiness with low to moderate hop aroma and moderate to no herb, spice and alcohol aroma.

Austin homebrew supply • fast & free delivery on orders over $55! Dark saison is, well, dark, but it also still features a complex and dry flavor profile, high carbonation, and a penchant for creative ingredient use that we've come to expect from artisanal, farmhouse styles. I had already interviewed the ale apothecary's founder paul arney for the viking age brew and i knew his interest in nordic farmhouse ales. In raw ale, this doesn't happen. The bjcp style guide says:

This homebrew recipe uses the following ingredients: In raw ale, this doesn't happen. Phil markowski's widely popular and influential 2004 book farmhouse ales helped make the term common in craft beer. Filter through a sieve lined with a coffee filter. Another summer wheat, but changed up the recipe a bit.

Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer. Here is everything you need to know. Sahti is a very process driven beer, and the old techniques are the key to success. Luckily the ale apothecary in bend, oregon answered my collaboration call. Another summer wheat, but changed up the recipe a bit.

Mash grains at 153° f (67° c) for one hour. Dark winter saison recipe iv. Sparge with 168° f (76° c) water to collect 7 gallons. This is an introduction to ancient homebrewed farmhouse ales of northern europe. Sahti is a very process driven beer, and the old techniques are the key to success.

I had already interviewed the ale apothecary's founder paul arney for the viking age brew and i knew his interest in nordic farmhouse ales. Apart from the difference in the flavor, farmhouse brewers are mostly unaware of all this. And guess what, it is pretty awesome. Farmhouse brewers don't learn brewing by reading textbooks or taking courses. Dark saison is, well, dark, but it also still features a complex and dry flavor profile, high carbonation, and a penchant for creative ingredient use that we've come to expect from artisanal, farmhouse styles.

Finnish sahti is the best known of them, but similar beers exist in the nordic and baltic countries: Apart from the difference in the flavor, farmhouse brewers are mostly unaware of all this. 62 recipes found that match your criteria. 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped Farmhouse beers would be made primarily with ingredients available on the farm or very close by so it makes sense the recipe would be a few simple ingredients.

The term farmhouse ale is an overarching classification, encompassing and unifying many unique substyles of beers, including funky styles like saison, sahti, gotlandsdricka, biere de garde, and others. All grain belgian dark strong ale homebrew recipe. Farmhouse beers would be made primarily with ingredients available on the farm or very close by so it makes sense the recipe would be a few simple ingredients. Dark winter saison recipe iv. The term farmhouse ale has grown synonymous with saison.

Saison saison is a very flavorful belgian farmhouse ale with some unique characteristics. 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped Swapping the tropical fruity notes of french saison or saison ii for heavier banana, it provides a classic dry peppery saison character, and is again easier to work with than dupont. Luckily the ale apothecary in bend, oregon answered my collaboration call. Add the roasted barley extract to the wort at the start of the boil.

Farmhouse ales covers a few variations on each style, for eight recipes total. The did the same thing with winter. Mash at 159°f (71°c) for 60 minutes. Ever since, belgian and french saisons have almost. This collaboration brew is a fine example of how sahti can be brewed far away from its origins.

In raw ale, this doesn't happen.

Belle saison is a diastaticus strain that allows the brewers to achieve the high attenuation characteristic of this classic style.

Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer.

Dark winter saison recipe iv.

Saison saison is a very flavorful belgian farmhouse ale with some unique characteristics.

The recipe structure is similar o the other two books in the series.

Make your best dark saison.

Dark saison is, well, dark, but it also still features a complex and dry flavor profile, high carbonation, and a penchant for creative ingredient use that we've come to expect from artisanal, farmhouse styles.

The term farmhouse ale has grown synonymous with saison.

62 recipes found that match your criteria.

This homebrew recipe uses the following ingredients:

This dry farmhouse ale called figlet is a real texas gem!

It just means that raw ale gets a recognizably different flavor profile from boiled beer.

American dark wheat the exceptionally smooth, subtle caramel notes of the caracrystal® wheat malt really shine through in this lightly hopped american style wheat beer.

Some type of simple sugar is often used to keep the alcohol high while preserving a medium body to the beer.

The recipe structure is similar o the other two books in the series.

Belle saison is a diastaticus strain that allows the brewers to achieve the high attenuation characteristic of this classic style.

Here is everything you need to know.

Add the roasted barley extract to the wort at the start of the boil.

Farmhouse ales covers a few variations on each style, for eight recipes total.

Sahti is a very process driven beer, and the old techniques are the key to success.

Ever since, belgian and french saisons have almost.

The recipe structure is similar o the other two books in the series.

Mash grains at 153° f (67° c) for one hour.

Saison saison is a very flavorful belgian farmhouse ale with some unique characteristics.


Oh! Fudge Prairie Artisan Ales

Protips: Explain why you're giving this rating. Your review must discuss the beer's attributes (look, smell, taste, feel) and your overall impression in order to indicate that you have legitimately tried the beer. Nonconstructive reviews may be removed without notice and action may be taken on your account.

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3.94 /5 rDev -4.8%
look: 3.5 | smell: 3.75 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4

355 ml bottle served cold into a tulip. LCBO purchase for $9.00 CDN. Can't believe that there s actually Prairie beer here in Ontario. Picked up 3 to hopefully share some wealth. Can't make out the bottling date, it's in some code anyways. Hope it's not too old. Happy birthday to me.

Appearance - Pours midnight black with the thinnest wispiest dark tan head that fizzles away complete in 15 seconds. No lacing to speak of. Ominous looking.

Smell - Molasses first and foremost, with fudge, licorice and a faint metallic note there too. There is some booziness on the nose alone. I suppose some milk and dark chocolate mixed in too.

Taste - Loads of molasses again up front, with some bittersweet chocolate, fudge and booze. Light milk chocolate sweetness in the early aftertaste before turning back to fudge and dark chocolate.

Mouthfeel - Huge body, slick and dense. Carbonation is pretty low. Nice gentle warming at the back of the throat that becomes more assertive the more you drink.

Overall - A nice sipper, a tasty enough treat that is quite boozy and not quite as fudge-y as I had hooped. The flavors and feel are all there and maybe this is an old bottle, but I was left a little underwhelmed with my initial Prairie experience. Nonetheless, a worthwhile tipple.

4.37 /5 rDev +5.6%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

Bottled in July 2019. Pours a pitch black color with a thick brown foamy head. Head retention is decent. Lacing is good. Mild roasting on the aroma. Get mainly dark fruits and dark chocolate. Mild whiskey. Rich, creamy taste. Dark fruits and dark chocolate again. No coffee. Nice whiskey backing. Very smooth. Heavy bodied with mild carbonation.

4.43 /5 rDev +7%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

Has light carbonation with an above average body. Has a slick , creamy, oily feel which produces an overall excellent feel
Aroma is fresh brewed low acid black coffee, roasted figs and plums, bourbon, roasted malt, alcohol, fudge shows up as it warms
Taste is fudge, low acid bitterness black coffee . Roasted plum and fig, as well as some earthy wood
Complex, really well made, flavorful and totally worth trying. The fudge shows up very strong in taste and aroma as it warms

3.96 /5 rDev -4.3%
look: 3.75 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 3.75 | overall: 4

355 mL Bottle. ABV 12.1%.
Appearance: Black, Half a finger of mocha head, Slight lacing, Poor retention, Broken cap remains.
Aroma: Smells exactly like a "Malteser" chocolate candy, Milk chocolate, Dark chocolate, Fudge, Roasted malt, Vanilla, Molasses, Dark fruit, Dark bread, Roasted nuts, Licorice, Slight char, Slight caramel.
Mouthfeel: Under full body, Some thinness, Fairly boozy.
Flavour: Roasted malt, Milk chocolate, Dark chocolate, Molasses, Licorice, Roasted nuts, Hop bitterness, Char.
Overall:

4 /5 rDev -3.4%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4 | overall: 4

Pours black with a finger of caramel foam. Head retention is okay. Aroma is roasty, toasty, nutty, earthy malts with hearty brownie batter and caramel. It smells thick and full with a notable dessert quality. Flavor profile is roasty, toasty, nutty, earthy malts with a thick brownie batter mix over the top. It's slightly sweet, balancing out the initial bitter malts. Mouth feel is thick and full with a very modest creaminess. Overall, dense beer with some dessert qualities that balance and mesh well with the beer overall.

Served in a 15.5oz Speigalau tulip from a 12oz bottle.

4.25 /5 rDev +2.7%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

12oz bottle poured into a Firestone Walker nonic - apparently this beer is NOT retired??

A: No light getting through this brew on the pour - dark mocha colored head.

S: Really nice, smells like a combination Pastry Stout/Russian Imperial - molasses, maple syrup, licorice. toasted caramel and cocoa.

T: Follows the nose, and I like it syrupy molasses and burnt sugars, dark chocolate and maple syrup, licorice and lactose.

MF: Full, viscous, and sticky body. 'Fudgy' even.

O: A nice stout that's obviously shooting to be a dessert beer, and delivers without being cloying. Alcohol is very well hidden, dark sugary notes are prevalent. Not sure I would identify it with 'brownies' but its definitely a sweet and roasty beer.

4.59 /5 rDev +10.9%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4.75 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

Had this in a growler tonight. Great job Praire for brewing another fine beer. Not too sweet and it's def a Stout worth trying. Love the 11.5 ABV! Keep up the great work!

3.88 /5 rDev -6.3%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 3.75 | feel: 3.5 | overall: 3.75

Pours like motor oil before precipitating a meager skim of khaki foam. Rich aroma smells of peat, dark chocolate, peanut brittle, cake batter, as well as a whiff of currants and booze.

Balanced taste features molasses, toffee, and earthy, herbal hops up front, while smoldering alcohol does its thing on the back end. Warming evokes notes of oak, vanilla, and more pronounced heat. Medium body and fairly vigorous carbonation produce a mouthfeel that is decidedly thin for a stout.

I must confess that, despite the moniker, I get little in the way of fudge here. With that said, it's still a solid stout—bold and balanced, with enough bitter and sweet to strike a tenuous detente. A decent if unremarkable offering from Prairie,

3.24 /5 rDev -21.7%
look: 3.75 | smell: 4 | taste: 3 | feel: 2.5 | overall: 3

$9. That is what this costs. No doubt, because of the alcohol level. But I am not impressed.
No head, the nose has too much metal and then there is the boozy, off balance flavour, with a not very impressive aftertaste. Not sure where the brownie is supposed to be, but it's not here either. Pretty much everything is off in this one.
Save your money and buy two other brews that are more superior than this one.

4.25 /5 rDev +2.7%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

Pours black with a single finger mocha colored head that departs quickly. Some minor lacing.
Nose is a sweet milk chocolate, dark sweet fruits, toffees and a whiskey in the back seat.
Mouth is rich and sliky, chocolate, dark fruit, chocolate malts and whiskey.
Slight bitterness, low carbonation and nice long finish with lingering chocolate and whiskey.
Another decadent delivery by a top notch brewery. Kudos!!

4.06 /5 rDev -1.9%
look: 3.75 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 3.75 | overall: 4

Nearly black, slowly forms a fine, milk chocolate head with a minute or 2 retention.
Focused aroma of chocolate ice cream, very pure chocolate, not bitter vanilla.
Loads of cocoa on the palate, fresh and pure and rich, and only a touch of bitterness the chocolate cake taste builds to the finish and lingers a creaminess persists, like a milkshake whispers of alcohol heat velvety smooth feel, low carbonation, full body fair amount of residual sugar is at risk of outweighing the chocolate.

Awesome fudge-y flavour that lives up to its name, though wouldn't mind more carbonation, and heat, to balance sweetness.

4.5 /5 rDev +8.7%
look: 4.5 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

A little much for me on the chocolate side .. I figured it would be, so nothing against the beer at all still very balanced and drinkable to have such a rich flavor .

3.82 /5 rDev -7.7%
look: 4 | smell: 3.75 | taste: 3.75 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 3.75

Deep brown pour, medium viscosity from the tap. Small amounts of beige head that settle around the glass. Small patterns of lace form as the beer falls.

It takes a few minutes to open up, but after that you’re hit with a good amount of roasty, mildly bitter coffee & milk chocolate. On the tail there’s just the slightest touch of dark fruit that suggests this one maybe beginning to oxidize. That being said, I’ve read this observation in other reviews so it may just be par for the course.

Really well-rounded on the palate. You’re greeted again by some plum fruitiness, but it’s quickly replaced by a present earthy coffee bean quality. The toasted, earthy components do well to contrast those undertones of baker’s chocolate & pure cacao. While when you read brownies you’re think “sweet fudgy bomb”, this one hits more of the slightly bitter, organic tasting side of the ingredients.

As expected from Prairie, a great mouthfeel. Medium-bodied & smooth, with residual stickiness and a medium effervescent carbonation that cuts through a touch of boozy warmth on the tail.

dbrauneis from North Carolina

4.17 /5 rDev +0.7%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.25

A: Pours an opaque thick viscous jet black in color with moderate amounts of fine active visible carbonation and extremely faint dark cola brown + chestnut brown colored highlights. The beer has a finger tall foamy dark mocha colored head that reduces to a large patch of thin film covering a little more than 85% of the surface of the beer and a thin ring at the edges of the glass. Light amounts of lacing are observed.

S: Slightly stronger than moderate aromas of baked chocolate (definitely reminiscent of brownies baking) over the top of moderate aromas of dark + roasted + chocolate malts with a moderate amount of caramel + dark fruit (plum + fig) sweetness and a hint of earthy hops.

T: Upfront there are moderate flavors of dark + roasted + chocolate malts with a moderate amount of caramel + dark fruit (plum + fig) sweetness. That is followed by moderate to strong flavors of chocolate baked good (think brownies) and fudge. Light flavors of earthy hops. There is a moderate amount of roasty bitterness in the finish but it slowly gets balanced out by the chocolate sweetness.

M: Full bodied with moderate amounts of carbonation. Smooth.

O: Drinks easily considering the strength and hides the alcohol well. Not a super easy drinker but more of a slow sipper and a great replacement for a traditional dessert after dinner.

4.61 /5 rDev +11.4%
look: 5 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.75 | feel: 5 | overall: 4.75

Sometimes, you just have to deal with reality. I can't smell much off this beer, so I guess I have to downgrade it for that. There is a bit of a bitterness digression off the backtaste, so I guess I have to downgrade for that, too. Having said that.. HOLY CRAP! This is one fine tasting, CHOCOLATE INTENSIVE brew! I could not imagine how so much chocolate could be infused into a beer.. unless, of course, I started calculating what it could cost to add pure chocolate to a beer..and here we are. One fine, intense, chocolate ale. I freakin' love it! Spectacularly overpriced for you light beer guys, but incredibly rewarding for the beer adventurer.

4.5 /5 rDev +8.7%
look: 4.5 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

De 32gp. En copa Teku. Viendo Cristal Oscuro 1x07-08. Con galletas tostarica. Muy rico perfil chocolatoso. Aunque no oculta su fortaleza y marea un poco, se disfruta de principio a fin

4.15 /5 rDev +0.2%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

Not bad. Pours dark brown, slightly thinning colors on the edges, mild head and lacing. Smell is sweet chocolate over a minimal malty base. Chocolate is present on the taste, just not highly prevalent, get a little nuttiness in there too. Medium body, slightly mouth watering, but of an oily feel. Taste gets a bit stronger as it warms. Probably should have reviewed fresher. Wonder if it lost some of the chocolate flavor.

4.18 /5 rDev +1%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

Black in color with no penetration to light. No head. The aroma is of baker’s chocolate and black malt. I’m tasting decadent milk chocolate and fudge. The mouth is chewy, thick, and sticky.

4.15 /5 rDev +0.2%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

12oz bottle into a goblet. This was bottled in March 2019. so around 5 months old.

Thick black body. The initial decent tan head shrinks to a thick ring and covering. initially leaving some nice lacing.

Aromas of booze, dried fruit, and chocolate liquer come though.

Upon tasting, there is chocolate, molasses, and a strong alcohol warmth. As it warms, it becomes more pleasant and rolls around the tongue quite nicely. There is however a faint bitterness from the roasted malt with spoils it a little for this palate, though others may appreciate it cutting the sweet.

Mouth closing in on full, finish a chocolate burn with that light bitterness.

Overall, an enjoyable chocolate imperial stout. A few more months of aging might take the edge off the roasted malt taste away, but that's a light knock on an enjoyable stout.

3.77 /5 rDev -8.9%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4 | taste: 3.5 | feel: 4 | overall: 3.75

Found this locally on tap and said to myself, wth, I love brownies! This one is extremely sweet and fudgy. Medium heavy body and could excel as a dessert beer.

Side note: My bartender was right on point with a recommendation to try a 50/50 blend of this and Lost Coast Peanut Butter Chocolate Stout . . . which resulted in a surprisingly palatable bland.

4.25 /5 rDev +2.7%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

If there was a “decadent chocolatey imperial stout on PED’s” category in the GABF, this would be a runaway winner.

As it is, this is a really well executed pastry stout that features HUUUUUUGE chocolate aromas and flavors. If you don’t like chocolate (or fudge), stay away from this.

If you do like chocolate (or fudge), strap on your seat belt, because this is a flavorful ride.

4.09 /5 rDev -1.2%
look: 4 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4

me and beers like this have an interesting relationhip. this one gets a pass but i have to forget i paid 7.50 for it. poured black with a thin dark tannish head. pretty standard stout look. nose is less chocolatey than i expected, which was nice, with hints of other sweet things and vanilla coming in with some earthy notes that kept some things mellowed. flavor was fairly sweet chocolate and fudge mixture with a smack of heat that flowed into some earthiness and more fudge. never really packed the punch i expected flavor wise, but was still rich and tasty. quite a bit of heat but still really drinkable. not bad for what is usually a love em or hate em thing. halfway through i dumped ice cream in

4.18 /5 rDev +1%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 3.5 | overall: 4.25

Appearance: Black glass gives up a hazy ruby glow when seriously back lit. Struggles to hold a thin halo of dark tan foam.

Aroma: Chocolate syrup, light earthiness, maple syrup.

Taste: Sweet, toffee, malt, coffee, struggling to say "fudge" because it's not quite there, but there is a lot of chocolate.

Mouthfeel: Thin body, low carbonation, low alcoholic heat, oily.

Overall: Big beer, easy drinking, that spells danger. It's very sweet, but enough roasted grain to help give some complexity. It's a nice dessert sipper. Not entirely sure it's worth the big price tag ($8.50 for this 12 oz. bottle), but it's a good beer.

4.3 /5 rDev +3.9%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.25

A: Black with 1/2" of tan foam and loads of lacing.
N: Chocolate, brownie, sugar, and malt.
T: Chewy fudge/brownie with some burnt sugar and light malt flavors.
M: Medium feel with zero ABV, rich flavors.
O: A really well made beer, zero bite and flavors are in check, not too sweet or bitter. NICE!

4.13 /5 rDev -0.2%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4

Poured a black body with minimal khaki head that quickly dies. The aroma basically smells like fudge brownies. Smooth, thick, easy to drink, booze well-hidden, has a chocolate fudge taste with some "brownie thickness" and finishes a bit sticky. While it could be criticized as a one-note beer it is very good and worth having.


Brewing a Prairie Artisan Ales 'Merica clone

In September, my wife and I were lucky enough to make another trip to San Diego, one of the beer meccas of the U.S. Despite being accompanied by our 16-month-old daughter, we did pretty well in the beer department, I thought I personally had 36 new beers during the week we were there. Along with trips to the San Diego Zoo and several beaches, we also visited Modern Times, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens (Liberty Station location), Pizza Port Ocean Beach, and a few choice beer bars, such as Toronado.

As expected, many of the beers I had were fantastic. lots of very hoppy IPAs and DIPAs were consumed! However, one of my favorite beers of the trip was a hoppy Saison brewed by a fairly new brewery called Prairie Artisan Ales. out of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Yep. Oklahoma. They brew many different types of Saisons the one I had was called 'Merica. It was fabulously grassy and fruity, with a good amount of funk in both the aroma and flavor. When I arrived home, the Wyeast 3711 French Saison yeast I had ordered from my LHBS arrived I had originally planned on brewing a Modern Times Lomaland clone, or some other Saison, but I decided to attempt to put together a 'Merica clone recipe.

Searching the internet for other attempts at 'Merica clones turned up nothing. There IS some helpful info on Prairie's website, however:

"‘Merica is a single malt, single hop saison. It’s brewed with floot malted pilsner and 3lbs per bbl Nelson Sauvin hops. The beer is conditioned with 2 brett strains and wine yeast."

While I've never brewed with Nelson Sauvin hops before, I just happened to have 8 oz of it from an order I made with Yakima Valley Hops a few months ago. 3 lbs/bbl equates to about 8 oz for a 5 gallon batch. Perfect! It was meant to be (Disclaimer: If you put your mind to it, you can convince yourself of anything in homebrewing). Nelson Sauvin is a New Zealand variety hop that has been quickly growing in popularity over the past few years. It is well-known for a strong fruity flavor and aroma: gooseberries, passionfruit and grapefruit, or a Sauvignon Blanc (white wine) character.

I thought I'd try sending a direct message to Prairie's Facebook account, asking for a bit more help with the recipe, but unfortunately they didn't respond. I mainly wanted to get a rough idea of the hop schedule, and find out whether the beer was dry-hopped or not (I assumed it was, from the strong aroma). I dug around a little more, and found the IBUs (35) listed on the Shelton Bros. (beer importers) site they also note that the beer is "heavily dry-hopped". After a little more searching on Prairie's website, I found that their Standard Saison (their "everyday" beer) is dry-hopped with 1 lb/bbl of Motueka, another New Zealand hop variety. I figured this was a good number to shoot for in the dry-hopping of my 'Merica clone, which amounts to about 2.5 oz for 5 gallons.

The grist of the recipe was easy, obviously - 100% pilsner malt - with 3 grams of Gypsum thrown in the mash, just to increase the calcium levels of my water a little. As for the hop-schedule, however, I was on my own. When you're hopping a beer to about 35 IBUs with 8 oz in a 5 gallon batch, and the hop variety has an alpha acid % of 11. well, it seems to me that you pretty much have to avoid any early hop additions, or the IBUs on the beer are going to end up being too high. I fooled around with the additions on Beersmith, and decided to go with three at increasing amounts: 1 oz at 10 minutes, 2 oz at 5 minutes, and 2.5 oz at flameout, with a 15-minute hop steep. That should get me roughly around 35 IBUs. and hopefully one hell of a lot of hop flavor and aroma. And a lot of hop sludge leftover.

  • Half will have the bottle dregs from several Brett beers pitched in over time. I'll try to start pitching the dregs before the 3711 is completely done fermenting, because in my experience with it, it can ferment LOW, which wouldn't leave much in the way of sugars behind for the Brett to work on. Not a very accurate approach, but hopefully it'll be ok. When the gravity seems to have plateaued, I'll dry-hop for a week or so and then bottle it as-is.
  • The other half will be fermented with JUST the 3711, dry-hopped for a week, and bottled without Brett. I figure this is a good way to a) have a Saison to drink a little earlier, and b) compare the qualities that the Brett hopefully adds to the other half.

UPDATE: After I tweeted the link to this post, Prairie responded back about the hop schedule. They say they use a 60-minute bittering addition (so, it would have to be very small), and 1 lb/bbl whirlpool, 2 lb/bbl dry-hop. This translates to 2.5 oz Nelson at flameout for a 5-gallon batch, and 5 oz for dry-hopping. So, I was right for the whirlpool, but added hops at 5 & 10 minutes that should have gone into the dry-hop, for the most part.

Recipe targets: (5.5 gallons, 75% efficiency) OG 1.056, FG

6.5%

Grains:
5 kg (100%) Bohemian Pilsner

Hops:
Nelson Sauvin - 28 g (11% AA) @ 10 min
Nelson Sauvin - 56 g @ 5 min
Nelson Sauvin - 70 g @ flameout (steeped for 15 minutes)
Nelson Sauvin - 78 g dry-hop for 7 days (divided in two, 39 g for each half-batch)

Misc.: 1/2 tab Irish moss @ 5 min

Yeast: Wyeast 3711 French Saison (with a 1.5 L starter)

Water: Fredericton city water, carbon-filtered 3 g Gypsum in the mash

- Brewed on October 7th, 2013, by myself. 60-minute mash with 16.5 L of strike water, mashed in a little under target temp of 151 F. Sparged with 5.5 gallons of 168 F water for final volume of

- SG at 1.044, slightly over target of 1.042. 90-minute boil. Final volume a bit over 5.5 gallons. Flameout hops steeped for 15 minutes, then turned on immersion chiller. Chilled down to 64 F, then poured

10 L into 3-gallon Better Bottle, and the rest into a 6-gallon BB (lots of trub got into this half). OG on target of 1.056. Aerated with 60 seconds of pure O2 for each half, and placed in laundry room, ambient temp about 72 F.

- 8/10/13 - 14/10/13 - Over this week, visible fermentation was never fast and furious, bubbling about 3-4 times per 10 seconds in the airlock, temp 70 F. Gravity got down to 1.009, so I attached a heat belt to the non-Brett portion and turned it on, bringing the temp up to the high 70s. Pitched the bottle dregs of two bottles of Orval into Brett portion.

- 25/10/13 - Added dry hops to non-Brett portion directly into primary.

- 29/10/13 - Bottled non-Brett portion with 85 g table sugar, aiming for 3 vol CO2 for 10 L and a max temp of 78 reached.

- 4/11/13 - Over the next few weeks, pitched bottle dregs of three more bottles of Orval and one bottle of Allagash Confluence. Racked Brett portion into secondary on Nov. 12th.

- 28/11/13 - Added dry-hops to Brett portion into secondary fermentor.

- 4/12/13 - Bottled Brett portion with 67 g table sugar (and

1/8 pack Lalvin EC-1118 rehydrated yeast. a white wine yeast, unfortunately realized I didn't have any red wine yeast), aiming for 3 vol CO2 for 2.13 gallons with a max temp of 78 F reached.

- 24/12/13 - Tasting notes. damn, what a delicious beer! Huge Nelson presence, lots of fruit (berries, specifically). amazing! Close to the real thing, but more hoppy and lacking a bit of hard-to-place funkish character.


Meet the Brothers Emboldening Tulsa's Craft Beer Scene

Colin and Chase Healey weren&apost that close when they were kids, largely due to their age difference, but the brothers—Tulsa natives who are now 33 and 28—have always looked out for each other. Take the time Chase tried to stop a couple bullies from stealing Colin&aposs bus seat on the way home from school.

"Chase stood in the middle of the aisle and told the kids they&aposd have to go through him first," says Colin. "They pushed him out of the way and proceeded to bang my head against the window, but at least he stood up for me."

The pair&aposs paths merged in a much different manner a decade later when Chase decided to channel his love of homebrewing into Prairie Artisan Ales and hired Colin as its art director. Launched in 2012 with the help of Oklahoma&aposs nearly century-old Krebs Brewing Co. (best known for its Choc Beer line), it didn&apost take long for the craft beer company to eclipse Chase&aposs last gig (tackling the tanks at COOP Ale Works) and make its presence known on a regional level.

A lot of that has to do with how the Healeys realized their restless vision. With Krebs in place to handle manufacturing𠅋ottling and brewing everything the way a record label presses and packages LPs𠅌olin and Chase were able to focus on the left-field label designs and complex recipes that instantly resonated with consumers and critics.

"My goal for Prairie was to create a creative outlet for myself and Colin," explains Chase. "I wanted to sell beer in unique places, and have fun along the way…. We were lucky to be working with the Krebs crew the whole time. Their brewing team is very talented, and [president] Zach [Prichard] is a natural leader. All I had to do was develop things I was excited about and they executed it. It really helped me stay focused."

"We were very proud of our long heritage before Prairie," adds Prichard, "but we struggled to create a beer that resonated with drinkers. It was clear within the first few months that Prairie was something special."

Between Colin&aposs one-of-a-kind drawings—psychedelic scribbles that could pass for panels in a really peculiar comic book𠅊nd Chase&aposs winning streak with saisons and stouts, Prairie was able to score an expansive distro deal with Shelton Brothers at the tail end of 2012. This profile-raising move, along with a handful of Evil Twin collabs and heady in-house hits (Prairie&aposs stellar Bomb! series of imperial stouts has earned nearly perfect marks on RateBeer and BeerAdvocate every year), suddenly put the Healeys&apos small operation on the same level as new-schoolers like Mikkeller, To Øl, and Omnipollo. It also earned Prairie a cult following despite Chase&aposs decision to relinquish his head brewer role and sell Prairie to Krebs in 2016.

"I wasn&apost surprised [by their offer]," explains Chase. "They&aposre some of my best friends. We&aposve been working on Prairie together since day one, so there was never really another option."

As for why he stepped away from his full-time gig less than five years after founding Prairie, Chase says, "I think I realized my limitations as a manager more than anything, and knew a change needed to happen for Prairie to keep moving forward. I basically had to get out of the way…. By the time we did the deal, the guys were so dialed in and creating new projects, it was mostly a relief to know Prairie was in good hands and continuing to go in an exciting direction."

"Honestly, I don&apost think a lot has changed," adds Colin. "At least, not for me. I don’t think we could ever replace Chase he&aposs incredible. It just meant we all have to step it up a bit and fill those gaps."

This is where Prairie&aposs expansion plans differ from its competitors. Unlike the many craft brewers that have fielded million, or even billion, dollar takeover deals from the parent companies of Budweiser, Corona, and Stella Artois, Prairie remains an Oklahoma business through and through. The folks in charge of its continued growth—including a brewpub in downtown Tulsa and taproom in nearby Oklahoma City—have merely changed, bringing their business acumen to the table in ways creatives often cannot.

And herein lies the best part of Prairie 2.0: Chase is still around for brainstorming sessions and special events like tap takeovers and dinners, but he doesn&apost have to worry about the company&aposs bottom line. Not that he has the time, anyway last summer marked the one-year anniversary of American Solera, an even more experimental second act from Chase and his wife Erica. Despite limiting its sales to customers at its two small taprooms, the DIY-or-die affair was named the second best new brewery in the world at the annual RateBeer Best awards last January.

In other words, the increasingly competitive, and often fickle, craft-beer community has already recognized American Solera for what it is: a celebration of the sour and spontaneous ales that Chase is constantly blending, aging, and bottling for local customers that consider themselves close friends. Or as he puts it, "I like being small and indie. I feel like we have a lot to figure out as a brand, so doing that while fewer people know what&aposs going on is helpful."

Chase also feels like he "can get out there from time to time" in terms of flavor profiles and beer styles now. "We currently have a Cherry Limeade double IPA as an homage to Sonic Drive-In," he says, "but it&aposs made with organic juices, nothing artificial. I like the challenge of creating bold flavors. It can even be out of balance at times that&aposs typically the point."

As the day-to-day manager of American Solera&aposs business dealings, Erica is quick to laugh at a question about a "typical day in the office," saying, "That makes it sound so official, but really it&aposs just a crappy room in the back of the brewery. Or more often for me, a desk in our bedroom. I often work from home as we have [two kids] who are my other &aposjob&apos.

She continues, "Multitasking is what I do best on any given day, you can find me keeping the books, doing accounting, filling orders, labeling bottles, or performing random tasks. It&aposs typically all-hands-on-deck at the brewery, with multiple projects being tackled by our small staff and family. Everyday looks a little different that&aposs part of what we love about it."

American Solera also brings Chase&aposs life full circle in many ways, from getting to work alongside his high school sweetheart to bringing an old friend on board for branding initiatives and whimsical bottle designs. Not just any design or art major, either Joe Cappa grew up with Chase, and the duo often worked on drama and video projects together. They even won an acting competition in middle school where Chase was tapped to play a female character.

"Our drama teacher told us it was a terrible idea and urged us to both play male characters," says Cappa. "We performed the duet and won first place. Our drama teacher wrote us an apology card.

He continues, "Our friendship has always been rooted in art," explains Cappa. We probably didn&apost see any point in hanging out if it wasn&apost for making something together. I&aposve always trusted his taste, and he seems to trust mine. It&aposs interesting because I think the underlying message behind Prairie and American Solera is to celebrate camaraderie. Our relationship is a lifelong one."


Prairie Artisan Ales

Банка

Earned the Verified Adventure (Level 74) badge!

Бутылка

Pretty unique stout with the ingredients hitting at different times. nice the oily walnut/nutty finish

Банка

Earned the Photogenic Brew (Level 40) badge! Earned the Pucker Up (Level 9) badge! Earned the Fruits of Your Labor (Level 8) badge!

Wow so delicious! Probably becoming one of my favorites

Бутылка

Earned the Cheers to Independent U.S. Craft Breweries (Level 2) badge!

Бутылка

Earned the Cheers to Independent U.S. Craft Breweries (Level 2) badge! Earned the Hopped Up badge! Earned the 2X (Level 21) badge!

Surprisingly very good with a good sour cherry taste

Earned the Take It Easy badge!

I’m not sure you gotta - worth a try

Бутылка

Earned the Cheers to Independent U.S. Craft Breweries (Level 6) badge! Earned the Land of the Free (Level 24) badge!

I've apparently had this before. But I'm increasing my rating because it's fucking great

Розлив

Earned the Verified Adventure (Level 38) badge!

Only for dessert. So rich and good

Бутылка

Earned the Cheers to Independent U.S. Craft Breweries (Level 45) badge! Earned the Sky's the Limit (Level 12) badge! Earned the Beyond a Shadow of a Stout (Level 5) badge! Earned the Pucker Up (Level 17) badge!

Банка

Розлив

Бутылка

Better as it warms but largely a swing and a miss. Tussin nose and cough drop flavor. Not loving it.

Розлив

Earned the Draft City (Level 31) badge!

Розлив

Earned the Night Out badge! Earned the Middle of the Road (Level 2) badge!

Hoch die Hände, Wochenende

Бутылка

Earned the Cheers to Independent U.S. Craft Breweries (Level 18) badge! Earned the Heavy Weight (Level 19) badge!

Бутылка

Earned the To Go Please (Level 37) badge! Earned the Beyond a Shadow of a Stout (Level 23) badge!

alt="Bobby K. avatar" /> /> /> /> /> />

Brewery Locations

Verified

Prairie OKC Oklahoma City, OK

Top Beers

Bomb! Stout - Imperial / Double Coffee

Christmas Bomb! Stout - Imperial / Double

Birthday Bomb! Stout - Imperial / Double

Standard Farmhouse Ale - Saison

Phantasmagoria IPA - Imperial / Double

Paradise Stout - Imperial / Double

Rainbow Sherbet Sour - Fruited

Vape Tricks Sour - Fruited

Funky Gold Mosaic Sour - Other

Double Dunk Stout - Imperial / Double

Popular Locations

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Prairie OKC Oklahoma City, OK

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Lowe’s Foods Presents Virtual Beer Hunting Charleston, NC

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BrewDog Malmö Malmö, Skåne län

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McNellie's - Tulsa Tulsa, OK

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Szynkarnia Local Food & Multitap Wrocław, Województwo dolnośląskie

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Prairie Artisan Ales

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Stout - Imperial / Double Coffee

Bomb! is an imperial stout aged on Nordaggio's espresso beans, chocolate, vanilla beans, and ancho chile peppers. All the flavors meld to create a truly… Read More

Bomb! is an imperial stout aged on Nordaggio's espresso beans, chocolate, vanilla beans, and ancho chile peppers. All the flavors meld to create a truly unique beer. The peppers add just the right amount of heat to complement the intense coffee and chocolate flavors. Read Less

The Bomb! that we all know and love, with the addition of Christmas spices – cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg.

The Bomb! that we all know and love, with the addition of Christmas spices – cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg. Read Less

Imperial stout aged on coffee, cacao nibs, vanilla beans and chile peppers. Finished with caramel sauce.

Imperial stout aged on coffee, cacao nibs, vanilla beans and chile peppers. Finished with caramel sauce. Read Less

Prairie Standard is our everyday beer. Its a light, crisp saison with a hoppy finish. This beer is dry hopped 1lb per bbl with Motueka hops. A lovely… Read More

Prairie Standard is our everyday beer. Its a light, crisp saison with a hoppy finish. This beer is dry hopped 1lb per bbl with Motueka hops. A lovely New Zealand hop with a spicy lime like flavor and aroma. Read Less

Phantasmagoria is an IPA that is low in malt flavors, but high in hops. We brew this beer as a nod to the big hoppy beers of the west coast. We use loads… Read More

Phantasmagoria is an IPA that is low in malt flavors, but high in hops. We brew this beer as a nod to the big hoppy beers of the west coast. We use loads of citrusy and piney hops at the end of the boil and in the fermenter to make this beer a hop experience. Read Less

Imperial Stout Aged on Coconut and Vanilla.

Imperial Stout Aged on Coconut and Vanilla. Read Less

Summer forward sour ale with raspberry, pineapple and orange. Do yourself a favor and toss one in the cooler on your way to the pool or river, you deserve… Read More

Summer forward sour ale with raspberry, pineapple and orange.
Do yourself a favor and toss one in the cooler on your way to the pool or river, you deserve a rainbow! Read Less

Sour ale aged on cherries

Sour ale aged on cherries Read Less

Imperial Stout brewed with Oreo Cookies.

Imperial Stout brewed with Oreo Cookies. Read Less

Stout - Imperial / Double Oatmeal

Apple Brandy Barrel aged Noir

Apple Brandy Barrel aged Noir Read Less

Aged in rum barrels w/ coffee, cacao nibs, vanilla beans and chilies added.

Aged in rum barrels w/ coffee, cacao nibs, vanilla beans and chilies added. Read Less

Stout - Imperial / Double Oatmeal

Vanilla Noir is Prairie Noir aged on organic, fair trade vanilla beans, and let’s just say it takes a lot of beans! The vanilla flavor compliments the… Read More

Vanilla Noir is Prairie Noir aged on organic, fair trade vanilla beans, and let’s just say it takes a lot of beans! The vanilla flavor compliments the whiskey barrel aging process and adds a delicious layer to the beer. Read Less

Prairie Flare! Flare (yes, that’s how we are spelling it) is our gose that we have added citrus fruit to. This beer is slightly tart, a little salty,… Read More

Prairie Flare! Flare (yes, that’s how we are spelling it) is our gose that we have added citrus fruit to. This beer is slightly tart, a little salty, and has a nice balance from the fruit and spices. (Orange and Coriander) Read Less

Birra is a light, sessionable farmhouse ale. It is crisp with notes of black pepper and orange and goes perfectly with food.

Birra is a light, sessionable farmhouse ale. It is crisp with notes of black pepper and orange and goes perfectly with food. Read Less

Stout - Imperial / Double Pastry

Imperial stout brewed with brownies

Imperial stout brewed with brownies Read Less

Prairie Hop is our hop driven saison. This beer is packed with Simcoe and Citra hops. Notes of peach, mango, and tangerine can be found in the flavor… Read More

Prairie Hop is our hop driven saison. This beer is packed with Simcoe and Citra hops. Notes of peach, mango, and tangerine can be found in the flavor and aroma of this beer. The beer finishes dry which helps the hops jump out of the glass flavor wise. Read Less

Imperial Stout brewed with copious amounts of vanilla & pecans.

Imperial Stout brewed with copious amounts of vanilla & pecans. Read Less

Sour ale with blueberries and lemon zest.

Sour ale with blueberries and lemon zest. Read Less

‘Merica is a single malt, single hop farmhouse ale. It’s brewed with floor malted pilsner and 3lbs per bbl Nelson Sauvin hops. The beer is conditioned… Read More

‘Merica is a single malt, single hop farmhouse ale. It’s brewed with floor malted pilsner and 3lbs per bbl Nelson Sauvin hops. The beer is conditioned with 2 brett strains and wine yeast. The Nelson hops provide white wine flavors while Brettanomyces add a juicy quality to the beer. Read Less

Imperial Stout Aged in Bourbon Barrels with Coconut and Vanilla

Imperial Stout Aged in Bourbon Barrels with Coconut and Vanilla Read Less

Stout - Imperial / Double Coffee

Imperial Stout with Peanut Butter Roasted Coffee.

Imperial Stout with Peanut Butter Roasted Coffee. Read Less

Stout - Imperial / Double Oatmeal

A big Imperial Stout aged in Jamaican Rum barrels.

A big Imperial Stout aged in Jamaican Rum barrels. Read Less

Saison brewed with citrus fruit, lacto, and brett.

Saison brewed with citrus fruit, lacto, and brett. Read Less

Prairie Ale is our classic saison. We brew this beer with pilsner malt, wheat malt, flaked wheat, and cane sugar. A healthy dose of saaz hops are used… Read More

Prairie Ale is our classic saison. We brew this beer with pilsner malt, wheat malt, flaked wheat, and cane sugar. A healthy dose of saaz hops are used to add a spicy element to the beer. Prairie Ale is fermented with a mix of ale yeast, wine yeast, and brettanomyces. Notes of black pepper and pineapple can be found in this beer. Read Less


Stillwater 12 pack seltzer, Prairie Cherry Bomb and more coming from Abu Nawas this week!

Prairie Artisan Ales You Gotta Horchata 12/12oz – Horchata inspired Imperial Stout with Cinnamon, Vanilla, and Sugar. Warm-up this winter with our newest stout, You Gotta Horchata! This treat is packed with cinnamon, vanilla, and sugar and will satisfy your craving whether it’s sweet or boozy! 10.8% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Paradise 12/12oz Bottles – Imperial Stout with Vanilla and Coconut. 13% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Moscow Mule 6/4/12oz CANS – Moscow Mule Double Hard Seltzer. 8.7% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Slush 6/4/12oz CANS – Sour ale with Strawberry and Raspberry. Finished with fresh lemon and lime zest. 6.1% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Rainbow Sherbet 6/4/12oz CANS – Have you ever drank a rainbow? Well, now you can! Sour ale with raspberry, pineapple, and orange. 5.2% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Spectrum 6/4/12oz CANS – Sour Ale with Cinnamon, Hibiscus, and Chili Peppers. 5.3% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Plum Conundrum 6/4/12oz CANS – Sour Ale with Plum, Black Currant, and Blackberry. 5.2% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Blueberry Boyfriend 6/4/12oz CAN – Sour Ale with Blueberries and Lemon Zest! Just in time for the warmup, or so we hope! 5.4% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Vape Tricks 6/4/12oz CANS – Sour Ale Aged on Cherries. 5.9% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Pink Guava Funk 6/4/12oz CANS – Sour Ale with Brett and Pink Guava. 6.3% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Cocoa Berry 6/4/12oz CANS – Imperial Sour Pastry Ale with Orange, Lemon, Lime, Raspberry, Blueberry, Grapefruit, Cacao Nibs, and Toasted Marshmallow. 7.5% ABV.
Prairie Artisan Ales Millennial Mansion 6/4/12oz CANS – Imperial Sour Ale with Orange Peel, Lemon Peel, Lime, Blueberry, Cherry, and Marshmallow. 7.7% ABV.
Prairie Artisan Ales Prairie Flare 6/4/12oz CAN – Gose with Citrus Fruits and Coriander. 5.4% ABV.
Prairie Artisan Ales Standard 6/4/12oz CAN – Light, Crisp Farmhouse Ale Dry-Hopped with Motueka hops, a lovely New Zealand hop with a spicy lime-like flavor and aroma. 5.6% ABV.

Prairie Artisan Ales Phantasmagoria 6/4/12oz CAN – Big, Bold Double IPA. 8.0% ABV.


Best in Beer 2019 Readers' Choice: Who Brews It Best?

For our Best in Beer 2019 issue, we asked for your favorite brewers of eight different styles of beer. Here are the results.

Each brewery's 2018 rank is listed in parentheses a ( + ) means that it did not appear on last year's list.

Favorite Saison Brewer

1. Brasserie Dupont (1)
2. Hill Farmstead (5)
3. Boulevard (2)
4. Allagash (6)
5. Ommegang (3)
6. Funkwerks (4)
7. Jester King (7)
8. Side Project (13)
9. Sante Adairius (15)
10. Brewery Vivant (8)
11. Blackberry Farm (18)
12. Crooked Stave (1)
13. Jolly Pumpkin ( + )
14. Oxbow ( + )
15. Prairie Artisan Ales ( + )
16. New Belgium ( + )
17. Off Color ( + )
18. Goose Island (16)
19. Holy Mountain ( + )
20. Dogfish Head ( + )

Favorite Stout or Porter Brewer

1. Founders (1)
2. Guinness (2)
3. Left Hand (3)
4. Bell’s Brewery (7)
5. Goose Island (5)
6. North Coast (4)
7. Bottle Logic ( + )
8. Firestone Walker (12)
9. WeldWerks ( + )
10. Prairie Artisan Ales (15)
11. Toppling Goliath ( + )
12. Perennial ( + )
13. Tree House ( + )
14. Deschutes (6)
15. New Holland (8)
16. Samuel Smith ( + )
17. Stone (10)
18. The Bruery (16)
19. Alesmith (9)
20. Fremont (18)

Favorite Abbey-Style Brewer

1. Ommegang (1)
2. Westvleteren (4)
3. Allagash (3)
4. Chimay (2)
5. New Belgium (7)
6. St. Bernardus (5)
7. Westmalle (6)
8. Rochefort (10)
9. The Lost Abbey (11)
10. Duvel (8)
11. Unibroue (9)
12. Boulevard (12)
13. Orval (18)
14. Avery (15)
15. La Trappe (14)
16. North Coast ( + )
17. Firestone Walker ( + )
18. Spencer ( + )
19. Taxman ( + )
20. Weyerbacher (19)

Favorite Pale Ale Brewer

1. Sierra Nevada (1)
2. Three Floyds (3)
3. Oskar Blues (2)
4. Toppling Goliath (8)
5. Hill Farmstead (7)
6. Half Acre ( + )
7. Trillium (4)
8. Bell’s Brewery (6)
9. Tree House (14)
10. Lagunitas (12)
11. New Belgium ( + )
12. Founders (9)
13. Deschutes (5)
14. Firestone Walker (10)
15. Maine Beer Co. (16)
16. New Glarus ( + )
17. Odell (13)
18. Summit (20)
19. Hop Butcher ( + )
20. Boulevard (11)

Favorite Sour or Wild Ale Brewer

1. Jester King (2)
2. Crooked Stave (4)
3. Cantillon (1)
4. Jolly Pumpkin (3)
5. Side Project (10)
6. Russian River (7)
7. Wicked Weed (5)
8. Cascade (6)
9. The Bruery Terreux (11)
10. The Rare Barrel (8)
11. New Belgium (9)
12. Allagash (12)
13. 3 Fonteinen (19)
14. Casey Brewing & Blending (17)
15. Dogfish Head ( + )
16. de Garde (13)
17. Upland ( + )
18. Lindemanns ( + )
19. Hudson Valley ( + )
20. New Glarus (15)

Favorite Lager Brewer

1. Samuel Adams (1)
2. Jack’s Abby (2)
3. Bierstadt Lagerhaus (4)
4. Firestone Walker (3)
5. Yuengling (5)
6. Suarez Family (7)
7. Pilsner Urquel (6)
8. Brooklyn (13)
9. Dovetail ( + )
10. Founders (10)
11. Victory (11)
12. Wibby ( + )
13. Live Oak (14)
14. Chuckanut (12)
15. pFriem ( + )
16. Austin Beer Garden ( + )
17. Ayinger (20)
18. Hill Farmstead ( + )
19. Metropolitan ( + )
20. Notch ( + )

Favorite American IPA Brewer

1. Russian River (2)
2. Stone (1)
3. Bell’s Brewery (4)
4. Sierra Nevada (3)
5. Firestone Walker (7)
6. Ballast Point (8)
7. Tree House ( + )
8. Dogfish Head (5)
9. Lagunitas (6)
10. Founders (12)
11. The Alchemist ( + )
12. Odell (9)
13. Three Floyds ( + )
14. Cigar City (16)
15. Green Flash (11)
16. Surly (14)
17. Deschutes (19)
18. Maine Beer Co. (13)
19. Toppling Goliath ( + )
20. Half Acre (15)

Favorite Hazy IPA Brewer

1. Tree House (1)
2. Sierra Nevada (4)
3. Trillium (2)
4. The Alchemist (3)
5. WeldWerks (5)
6. Other Half (10)
7. Old Nation ( + )
8. Hop Butcher (11)
9. Hill Farmstead (8)
10. Modern Times (9)
11. Monkish (16)
12. New Belgium (12)
13. Bissell Brothers (13)
14. Firestone Walker ( + )
15. Great Notion (7)
16. Narrow Gauge ( + )
17. Revision ( + )
18. Bearded Iris ( + )
19. Bell’s Brewery ( + )
20. Outer Range ( + )


We Asked 12 Brewers: What’s the Best Recent Collaboration Beer You’ve Had?

When the VinePair staff built the annual list of the best beers of 2020, they were reminded of the continued emergence of cause-based collaboration beers as an agent of change against extraordinary societal challenges. Unequivocally, these types of benevolent partnerships were breweries’ primary tool to confront crises both unprecedented and longstanding last year, from the coronavirus pandemic to systemic racism and police brutality.

In a year unlike any other, one of distancing, one of division, highly successful initiatives like Weathered Souls’ Black Is Beautiful, Other Half’s All Together, and Threes’ People Power saw beer makers of all sizes and shapes, and from all around the world, joining forces to address pressing social problems.

Ordinarily, brewery collaborations arise from way less unsettling circumstances. Brewers who admire each other get together for an afternoon to talk shop, share beers, and, of course, post photos on social media. (The project’s mechanics, like recipe design, are often hammered out over email or text prior to meeting.) Whatever the impetus, these partnerships have become a staple of the craft beer industry — and, as such, now regularly extend outside the brewing world to include musicians, sports teams, television shows, and all manner of partnerships within their respective communities.

Every Beer Lover Needs This Hop Aroma Poster

With that in mind, we wondered: What are the most memorable collaboration beers that have come out recently? To find the best examples of the moment, we spoke to 12 brewers across the country about their favorites (participants were asked to consider only those titles released over the previous 10 months).

From pastry stouts to pub ales, here’s what the experts picked for the best collaborations beers.

The Best Collaboration Beers Recommended by Brewers

  • Bierstadt Lagerhaus and Bagby Beer Company ‘Tmavè 13’
  • Dancing Gnome Beer ‘Watershed’ (with Rosalie Haizlett and Nine Mile Run Watershed Association)
  • Side Project Brewing ‘Leaner Blend #2’ (with Casey Brewing & Blending)
  • Karl Strauss and Modern Times Beer ‘Mosaic Oasis’
  • Angry Chair Brewing and Prairie Artisan Ales ‘Barrel-Aged Adjunct Trail’
  • Vitamin Sea Brewing and Branch and Blade Brewing ‘Driftwood Double IPA’
  • Highland Park Brewery and Craftsman Brewery ‘Continuing On’
  • Cellarmaker Brewing and Sante Adairus Rustic Ales ‘Hop Survivor’
  • Side Project Brewing and Anchorage Brewing Company ‘For Gabe’
  • Other Half Brewing FLX and Swiftwater Brewing ‘Peabody Punch’
  • Green Cheek Beer Co. and Track Brewing Co. ‘Strictly Speaking’
  • Bhramari Brewing Co. and Birds Fly South Ale Project ‘Out Back Counting Stars’

Keep reading for details about all the recommended beers!

“Bierstadt Lagerhaus’s collaboration with Bagby Beer Tmavè 13 was the best collab beer I had [recently]. While both producers are synonymous with thoughtful, top-tier beer, this Czech-style dark lager is particularly spectacular because of the experience it highlights. It has aromas reminiscent of a dimly lit Prague bierhall, and a palate that is saturated with belly laughs and life-long friendships. An inspiring collaboration that is as much about honoring friendship and community as it is about making world-class beer. People are what make beer special, and Tmavè 13 is a beautiful reminder of that.” —Phil Joyce, Co-owner and Blender, Amalgam Brewing, Denver

“Dancing Gnome’s Watershed, the first in a yearlong collaboration series with West Virginia-based illustrator Rosalie Haizlett and Pittsburgh’s Nine Mile Run Watershed Association, has really stuck out for me. Dancing Gnome will release a new beer each month with label artwork by Haizlett that celebrates the ecology of the rivers and streams of Western Pennsylvania, with part of the proceeds of the can sales being donated to the Nine Mile Run’s conservation projects. Watershed, the first in this collab series, is a New England-style IPA hopped with Galaxy, Nelson, and Ella. I really enjoyed the slight bitterness up front paired with assertive aromas of tropical fruit, grapes, and citrus, and the pillowy mouthfeel to round it all out. It had a great balance and complexity of hop aromas and pale malt notes. Dancing Gnome knocked this one out of the park, I loved the can artwork, and it’s awesome that the brewery is helping to benefit outside organizations with its beer.” —Lauren Hughes, Head Brewer, Necromancer Brewing, Pittsburgh

“I’m a huge fan of Side Project, so I was thrilled when one of my friends gifted me a bottle of Leaner Blend #2, the brewery’s collaboration with Casey Brewing & Blending, to celebrate buying my first house. Seven months in wine barrels give this mixed-culture saison a tart dryness that borders on mouth-puckering but doesn’t quite cross the line. It’s naturally carbonated and beautifully effervescent, and the addition of juicy Missouri peaches creates the mouthfeel and flavor of summer sunshine in a bottle. In short, this saison is perfectly farmhouse without being overly funky, so you can enjoy more than one without being overwhelmed by horse blanket.” —Kate Russell, Founder and Brewer, Hopkinsville Brewing Company, Hopkinsville, Ky.

“The best collaboration beer I’ve had recently was a beautiful IPA called Mosaic Oasis, brewed by Karl Strauss and Modern Times at the former. Being in San Diego, we’re all hop-obsessed and this beer really hits that hop craving that I get around 5 p.m. every day. They call it a San Diego IPA, which means it’s super light in color and has a relatively low bitterness in order to allow for the aromas and flavors of the hops — in this case Mosaic — to really shine and be the star. It has an almost explosive grapefruit and tangerine aroma along with some nice tropical notes to balance it out. A nice dry finish makes this beer super drinkable while still having a lot of character.” —Doug Constantiner, Co-founder and CEO, Societe Brewing Company, San Diego

“Barrel-Aged Adjunct Trail, from Angry Chair and Prairie Artisan Ales, is the perfect marriage of what both of these breweries do so well. This bourbon-barrel-aged imperial sweet stout, featuring coconut and hazelnut coffee, offers tons of barrel character and balanced adjuncts that don’t overshine the barrel but rather complement it. Sweet but not overly so. It’s simply everything you’d want from a barrel-aged pastry stout from these two titans.” —James Herrholz, Brewer, Corporate Ladder Brewing Company, Palmetto, Fla.

“I was lucky enough to snag a can of Driftwood double IPA from Vitamin Sea and Branch and Blade while brewing my own collab with the latter. It was a real treat, starting with the eye-catching label art, and the dense yellow pour. It drinks a touch sweet and incredibly soft, but with defined edges. This is exactly what I’m looking for in a beer like this. The Riwaka really blew me away, and I’m always astonished by Vitamin Sea’s use of Motueka hops.” —Caleb Hiliadis, Head Brewer, Amherst Brewing, Amherst, Mass.

“I loved a cask-conditioned saison called Continuing On by Highland Park Brewery and Craftsman Brewery. It had subtle notes of juniper and sage on the nose — a beautiful herbal, savory quality. There was perfect acidity, with some stone fruit and lemon peel, and a great tannin structure. The bitterness is in perfect balance, which is quite rare these days. I could continue to drink this all day.” —Shawn Bainbridge, Owner and Brewer, Halfway Crooks Beer, Atlanta

“There’s been no shortage of hazy IPAs in my life since I moved to Brooklyn from the Bay Area, but out West they seem to like a little more terpene with their juice. My buddy sent me a care package with Cellarmaker and Sante Adairus’s Hop Survivor, and it took me right back. Did you ever cut into a lime or a pineapple and catch a bit of pine smell to it? Motueka and Simcoe hops flood you with that exact dankness, while Columbus rounds out the earthy side and Galaxy provides fruitiness to make this one of my favorites of 2020.” —Daniel Gadala-Maria, Brewer, Other Half Brewing, Brooklyn

“For Gabe, a collaboration between Side Project and Anchorage to celebrate the latter brewery’s founder, Gabe Fletcher, on his business’s 10 years, perfectly showcases the strengths of each brand. This blend of barleywine and stout, featuring threads from both sides, combines delicate bourbon barrel notes with a malt profile that can only be described as amazing. The stout component balances the barleywine in a way that cuts the sweetness without losing the barrels that are the star of the show.” —Wade Meyer, Brewer, WeldWerks Brewing Co., Greeley, Colo.

“I choose a local collab between Other Half FLX and Swiftwater called Peabody Punch. It’s an 8 percent ABV Berliner weisse packed with pink guava, lime, green tea, and milk sugar. Instead of a low-ABV Berliner like the norm for the style, these two great local brands and friends of ours went big and bold. And why not? I love seeing this community come together and create interesting and unique takes on classic styles. The beer hits you with pink guava right up front, leading into a hint of green tea with lime. It finishes clean with a subtle hint of tartness. Very refreshing and fruity with a big backbone. It definitely doesn’t drink like an 8 percent beer. Two of my favorite local breweries teaming up to make great beer here in the greater Rochester area!“ —Chris Spinelli, Founder and Roc Brewing Co., Rochester, N.Y.

“I really liked the Green Cheek and Track Manchester-style modern pub ale, Strictly Speaking, hopped exclusively with Strata. Strata is my new favorite hop and I’ve always liked what Green Cheek does. I’ve always liked when brewers experiment on styles, so doing a cask-style ale that’s light in ABV but huge in flavor and aroma with that creamy mouthfeel, all while using my favorite hop and brewed by somebody I look up to, made this one stand out.” —Bryan Hendrickson, Head Brewer, Evans Brewing Co., Corona, Calif.

“Without a doubt, the farmhouse IPA, Out Back Counting Stars, made by the good folks at Bhramari and Birds Fly South. I was lucky enough to share a couple of these with Bhramari founder Gary Sernack during a recent weekend collab in Asheville we did, and for some reason, hearing the story behind a beer that they are passionate about always makes the beer even more memorable. The way those two breweries found a way to interweave their wildly different styles with a beer that truly represents both is impressive. Subtle funk from the Birds Fly house culture provides the perfect setting for the soft yet assertive dry-hop profile and makes this beer infinitely crushable, and really memorable. In a time where getting out and collaborating is few and far between, this beer really reminded me of the reason why collaborations can be so great and important.” —Josh Rake, Founder, Rake Beer Project, Muskegon, Mich.


9 Best Low-Carb Beers for Craft Brew Lovers

Photo: Courtesy of Anderson Valley Brewing Company

1. If you want a sour…

Anderson Valley Brewing Company’s Blood Orange Gose
Calories: 126 ABV: 4.2 percent
If you’re not a fan of hoppy beers, go for a gose (pronounced goza). A German-style beer that’s brewed with ground coriander seeds and salt, goses are typically low ABV, so it’s perfect for sipping on something light and flavorful. In this refreshing sour, the beer is fermented with blood orange to impart a citrusy, tart flavor.

Photo: Courtesy of Founders Brewing Company

2. If you want an IPA…

Founders Brewing Company’s All Day IPA
Calories: 140 ABV: 4.7 percent
Love the hoppy, floral flavors of a New England-style IPA? Then you’ll appreciate the crisp and aromatic taste of Founders’ All Day IPA. Simcoe and Amarillo hops infuse this session beer with a punch of sweet and bitter flavors, while keeping calories and alcohol content low. Crafted for the “active” beer lover, you can go from a hike to the party with this award-winning brew.

Photo: Courtesy of Left Hand Brewing

3. If you want a stout…

Left Hand Brewing’s Saison au Ble de Minuit
Calories: 199 ABV: 6.8 percent
Stouts are, by definition, boozy beers, which is why they’re so high in ABV. The average stout is upwards 300 calories, but this under-200 farmhouse ale packs the same full-bodied cocoa and espresso flavors of an imperial drink. You’ll also get hints of spice and dried fruit to balance the hearty tastes. We’ll toast to that!

Photo: Courtesy of Allagash Brewing Company

4. If you want a Belgian wheat beer…

Allagash Brewing Company’s Allagash White
Calories: 159 ABV: 5.1 percent
Spiced with a special blend of coriander and Curacao orange peel, this Belgian-inspired wheat beer doesn’t disappoint. And because it’s brewed with oats and malted wheat, you can bet it’s got a creamy finish and foamy top. Since you’ll save extra calories on this award-winning brew, it’s safe to pair it with a lobster roll — staying true to its Maine brewery roots.

Photo: Courtesy of Coney Island Brewing Company

5. If you want a pilsner…

Coney Island Mermaid Pilsner
Calories: 160 ABV: 5.3 percent
Pilsners are light-bodied beers, but they’re full of hoppy, floral and spicy tones. This German-style pilsner gets some heat from the rye malt, which is tamed with hints of grapefruit and lemon. While most people believe low-carb beers exist only in mermaid fairytales, we’re so glad we can find this delicious brew beyond its Brooklyn shores.

Photo: Courtesy of Blue Point Brewing Company

6. If you want a lager…

Blue Point Brewing Company’s Toasted Lager
Calories: 165 ABV: 5.5 percent
The Toasted Lager is Blue Point’s most popular beer, and for a good reason. Designed for easy drinking, the Toasted Lager is a brew you’ll want to enjoy every day, thanks to its low ABV and crisp and smooth taste. Brewed with six different grains, you’ve got all the sweet, roasted and bitter notes you’d want in an American amber lager — minus the whopping calories.

Photo: Courtesy of Prairie Artisan Ales

7. If you want a farmhouse ale…

Prairie Artisan Ales’ Standard
Calories: 168 ABV: 5.6 percent
Prairie is known for their lip-smacking ales, and this saison is no different. The Standard is dry hopped with Motueka, a New Zealand hop with a lime-like flavor, to pack zest without adding calories. A vibrant mix of fruity, tart and bitter tones, this golden-hued ale is semi-dry. So if you want a low-carb beer closest to the taste of champagne, this is the glass for you.

Photo: Courtesy of Sweetwater Brewing Company

8. If you want a pale ale…

Sweetwater Brewing Company’s 420 Extra Pale Ale
Calories: 168 ABV: 5.7 percent
Straight from Atlanta, Sweetwater Brewing delivers their version of a West Coast-style beer with the 420 Extra Pale Ale. If its name and golden tint isn’t enough pique your curiosity for a pour, then its refreshingly light carbonation is sure to tickle your taste buds. Packed with Cascade and Centennial hops, a delicious pint of this calorie-conscious pale ale is bursting with grapefruit flavor.

Photo: Courtesy of Bell’s Brewery

9. If you want a porter…

Bell’s Porter
Calories: 183 ABV: 5.6 percent
When it comes down to it, the main difference with porters and stouts is the ABV count stouts tend to be much higher in ABV. So if you’re craving the smooth and rich flavors in a stout but don’t want the extra calories, go for a glass of this award-winning porter. Its got hints of chocolate and coffee you’d expect and a surprising touch of bitter hops.


Watch the video: Prairie Artisan Ales Prairie Ale Saison Review - Ep. #257 (December 2021).