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The Daily Dish: Scientists Grow Mangoes in Space

The Daily Dish: Scientists Grow Mangoes in Space

Scientists Grow Mangoes in Space

Could space travel be the future of fruit? According to Shanghaiist, researchers sent mangoes to space in November as part of China’s Shenzhou-11 mission, and astronauts subjected the mangoes to different environmental conditions in an attempt to help them develop advantageous new genetic traits as quickly as possible. Now cells from those mangoes have been developed into buds in a research lab in Hainan, and scientists say the new “space mangoes” will develop higher-quality fruit, and more of it, compared to normal mangoes that have never been to space.

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The Chef Prepares Food on the Back of Your Hand at This Restaurant

Anton Piotrowski, a former MasterChef UK winner, is offering a nine-course tasting menu at his restaurant, the Brown and Bean in Plymouth, England. One of the courses is totally plate-free, but instead of simply asking customers to eat with their hands, Piotrowski serves the appetizer directly on the back of each customer’s hand, according to The Telegraph. If you fancy a go at this unique experience at Brown and Bean, first you’ll be asked to turn over your hand and make a fist. Then, the chef will squirt burnt apple sauce on the back and top it with chopped pork, blood radish, and apple blossom, which you’ll have to eat by hand and tongue.

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Here’s Why You Should Rethink Trying That Insanely Popular Raw Cookie Dough

Raw cookie dough towering with toppings that would make any ice cream sundae aficionado jealous is all the rage now, thanks to , the outrageously popular raw cookie dough shop that opened last year in New York City’s Greenwich Village. We knew that raw cookie dough topped with Nutella, sprinkles, and chocolate chips could not exactly be healthy for you, but nonetheless, just hearing the sugar content made us cringe. One scoop of raw cookie dough (even sans crazy toppings) contains 54.9 grams of sugar (gasp!), 448 calories, and 20 grams of fat.

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New York Has a $100 Liquid Platinum Margarita

People have been putting edible gold in food and cocktails forever, but now one New York restaurant is making things even fancier with a limited-edition “Liquid Platinum Margarita,” and it actually looks like a glass full of liquid metal. It’s made with Gran Patron Platinum tequila, which sells for $200 a bottle, mixed with Dolin, rose water, agave syrup, and lime juice. Then it’s mixed with edible platinum color and a pinch of xanthan gum, which makes the cocktail look like something out of an incredibly posh version of Star Trek. The Liquid Platinum Margarita was created by bartender Rael Petit, and it will be available at Delilah in NYC for $100 a pop until the end of April.

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Dunkin' Donuts Plans to Discontinue the Coffee Coolatta This Summer

This week, Dunkin’ Donuts announced that one of its more popular frozen beverage flavors, Coffee Coolatta, will be removed from the menu this summer in place of a new drink, the Frozen Dunkin’ Coffee. "Coolattas are a platform we've had for years," Paul Racicot, director of culinary innovation at Dunkin’ Donuts, said. "But, we believe it's time we ... contemporize our frozen platform." The company says that the new beverage will be able to attract a different type of customer in comparison to the Coolatta. The new drink will be a blended beverage made with coffee extract, sugar, and dairy.

For more, click here.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

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Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
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Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

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  • Weekly print edition
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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
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Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

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  • Unlimited web access
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

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  • Weekly print edition
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
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Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
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  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
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Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

Subscribe now for unlimited access

App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Print + App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • Weekly print edition
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

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  • Unlimited web access
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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Print + App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • Weekly print edition
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
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  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

Subscribe now for unlimited access

App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Print + App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • Weekly print edition
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

Subscribe now for unlimited access

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  • Unlimited web access
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  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Print + App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • Weekly print edition
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.


Raising the steaks

DINNER party recipes don’t come much weirder than this. Working in a tissue culture lab installed in a French art gallery, conceptual artists Oron Catts, Ionat Zurr and Guy Ben Ary will lovingly coax frog muscle precursor cells to grow into a miniature frog steak. Each day, the artists will “feed the food” giving nutrients to the growing steak as well as feeding some live frogs displayed alongside. The pièce de résistance will be a “feast”, where the artists, clad in grey chef’s uniforms, fry the steak and serve it on a table decked with silver cutlery and crystal goblets. There, watched curiously by an entourage of ribbiting frogs, they will solemnly eat it.

“Disembodied Cuisine” opens at France’s National Culture Centre in Nantes in March next year as an exploration of “victimless” meat consumption. It’s a commentary on how consuming food is related to exploitation, the artists explain, depicting a time “when GM and other manufactured food is shoved down the throats of unsuspecting consumers”. But don’t scoff – real life could soon be imitating art. Although you’re unlikely to be serving up engineered frog’s legs any time soon, tissue engineers in the US are already experimenting with ways of growing meat in the lab dish. The aim of the work is to develop food for astronauts on long space journeys, such as a mission to Mars. But like so much other space research, what happens up there could one day become commonplace down here too – just look what happened to Velcro. And in an era where our taste buds have been blunted by processed nuggets and hamburgers, we may not even notice the difference. &hellip

Subscribe for unlimited digital access

Subscribe now for unlimited access

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  • Unlimited web access
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Print + App + Web

  • Unlimited web access
  • Weekly print edition
  • New Scientist app
  • Videos of over 200 science talks plus weekly crosswords available exclusively to subscribers
  • Exclusive access to subscriber-only events including our 1st of July Climate Change event
  • A year of unparalleled environmental coverage, exclusively with New Scientist and UNEP

Existing subscribers, please log in with your email address to link your account access.