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Yogurt-Braised Chicken with Cashews and Raisins

Yogurt-Braised Chicken with Cashews and Raisins

Ingredients

  • 1 3-pound best-of-fryer chicken (8 pieces)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt
  • 4 teaspoons ground cumin, divided
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom, divided
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 1/2 cups raisins (about 12 ounces), divided
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 5 tablespoons Clarified Butter (see recipe)
  • 1 cup raw cashews (about 5 ounces)
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

Recipe Preparation

  • Place chicken, skin side up, on rimmed baking sheet. Mix 1 1/2 tablespoons salt, 3 teaspoons cumin, 1 teaspoon cardamom, and cayenne in small bowl. Sprinkle chicken generously on all sides with spice mix. Let stand 2 hours.

  • Combine 1 cup raisins and 1 1/2 cups hot water in medium bowl. Cover; soak until raisins are soft, at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour. Drain, reserving soaking liquid. Blend raisins and 3 tablespoons reserved soaking liquid in mini processor, adding more soaking liquid, if needed, to make smooth paste.

  • Place yogurt in medium bowl; whisk 1 minute to lighten. Add black pepper, cinnamon, remaining 2 teaspoons salt, 1 teaspoon cumin, and 1/2 teaspoon cardamom and whisk to blend.

  • Heat butter in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Add chicken, skin side down, and sauté until brown, about 6 minutes per side. Add remaining 1 1/2 cups raisins, cashews, and cloves. Slowly stir in yogurt mixture. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until chicken is cooked through, about 12 minutes.

  • Transfer chicken to platter. Whisk raisin paste and 1/3 cup lemon juice into sauce. Simmer to blend, whisking constantly, about 4 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and more lemon juice, if desired. Spoon over chicken.

,Photos by Pornchai MittongtareReviews Section

Hoobears's Blog

I really like Middle Eastern food though my experience is quite limited. Sure, hummus, falafel, chicken rice cart, Ali Baba (South SF) and Kabul Afghan Cuisine (San Carlos & Burlingame) are familiar to me but I imagine this is similar to Americans who are familiar with “Chinese” food. You know, chow mien and General Tso’s chicken. I have the Jerusalem cookbook, but I want to learn more, eat more and cook more. At some point, I want to make a field trip to Little Kabul in Fremont, too. Turkey has also been high on the destination list for a while, but the timing hasn’t worked out quite yet.

In search of a recipe for my favorite Afghan eggplant and lamb dish, I found a recipe for lawang, an Afghan dish of braised chicken in a turmeric and yogurt sauce. Joel almost always orders the lawang when we go to Kabul Afghan Cuisine and since we had Greek yogurt (it is now a permanent fixture in our fridge and a permanent substitute for sour cream unless we have guests) and extra chicken legs I didn’t use for the chicken adobo I figured this would be the perfect time to try the recipe. It is so easy and delicious–just takes a bit of patience as the onions and chicken slowly simmer into a velvety sauce. Don’t stir the yogurt in until you are ready to eat it–otherwise the yogurt will curdle. It’ll still taste good but it’ll look a little gross (I learned this when reheating later).

I had bought brown basmati rice in the Middle Eastern section of the grocery store. Usually, I make rice in the rice cooker but I thought I would try rice over the stove according to the package directions. My gut told me something was wrong when the recipe said 4 cups of water to 1 cup of rice…mush!


TURMERIC BRAISED CHICKEN IN YOGURT - LAWANG

This pot of chicken gorgeousness will convert even the most stubborn skeptic of Afghan cuisine. Called lawang, it’s our favorite center-of-the-table dish for dinner parties. In addition to being delicious, it can be made a day ahead and reheated just before serving. It’s just as good as if you’d made it on the spot.

The first time I tried lawang was at Helmand, an Afghan restaurant here in San Francisco. They serve a version made with lamb that’s a true world beater. When Humaira suggested we prepare a chicken lawang, I was hesitant. I couldn’t imagine the lamb being improved upon. But Humaira isn’t hugely fond of lamb, so I agreed. And she was right, it worked beautifully with the chicken.

The key to lawang is patience. You must cook the onions and chicken low and slow for quite some time. This eventually renders delicious juices that, when combined with yogurt, creates an unctuous, turmeric-scented sauce.

It’s best to use the fattier leg and thigh meat rather than the breast in order to achieve a tender braised texture. Also important is how you incorporate the yogurt, the very last step. If you add cold yogurt to hot chicken, it will curdle and rob the sauce of its silky texture. We suggest bringing the yogurt up to room temperature and letting the chicken cool slightly before marrying the two in the pan.

Be sure to have plenty of nan or good pita bread handy. You will need it to scoop up all that “so good it might make you cry” yogurt sauce.

Turmeric Braised Chicken in Yogurt

Lawang

1½ cups Greek-style yogurt stirred until creamy

3 lbs skinless, bone-in chicken legs and thighs, separated

2 large onions, pureed in food processor (or finely chopped)

4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1/2 tsp. ground black pepper

1 cup fresh cilantro, roughly chopped

Remove the yogurt from the refrigerator. Wash the chicken and pat dry with a dish towel or paper towel.

Heat ¼ cup of the oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot with a lid. Cook the onions over medium-high heat for 10 minutes. Add the garlic and continue to saute until deeply browned (another 5 minutes or so).

Add the remainder of the oil, the chicken and salt. Stir the chicken to coat with the onions, turn heat to low, put on the lid and cook for 25 minutes. Stir regularly to keep the chicken from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add the pepper, turmeric and coriander and stir well to incorporate the spices evenly into the dish. It should take on a deep yellow color. Cover and continue to cook on low for another 25 to 30 minutes or until the sauce thickens and the chicken is tender and cooked through. If the pan goes dry during cooking add water, a tablespoon at a time, as needed.

Remove the pan from the heat and let it rest for 10 minutes to cool the dish slightly. Add the yogurt and cilantro and stir thoroughly. Return to the heat and gently cook over low heat for 5 minutes. The sauce will be thick & creamy.

Serve with basmati rice such as challaw and nan or pita bread.

Note: if you plan to make this a day ahead, cook the chicken but refrain from the last step of the recipe, adding the yogurt. When you are ready to serve, gently reheat the chicken to warm (but not hot), add the room-temperature yogurt and cilantro, and continue to cook for 5 minutes until heated through.


Afghan Culture Unveiled

Turmeric Braised Chicken in Yogurt

This pot of chicken gorgeousness will convert even the most stubborn skeptic of Afghan cuisine.   Called lawang, i t’s our favorite center-of-the-table dish for dinner parties.   In addition to being delicious, it can be made a day ahead and reheated just before serving.    It’s just as good as if you’d made it on the spot.

The first time I tried lawang was at Helmand, an Afghan restaurant here in San Francisco.   They serve a version made with lamb that’s a true world beater.   When Humaira suggested we prepare a chicken lawang, I was hesitant.   I couldn’t imagine the lamb being improved upon.   But Humaira isn’t hugely fond of lamb, so I agreed.   And she was right, it worked beautifully with the chicken.

The key to lawang is patience.   You must cook the onions and chicken low and slow for quite some time.   This eventually renders delicious juices that, when combined with yogurt, creates an unctuous, turmeric-scented sauce.   

  It’s best to use the fattier leg and thigh meat rather than the breast in order to achieve a tender braised texture.   Also important is how you incorporate the yogurt, the very last step.   If you add cold yogurt to hot chicken, it will curdle and rob the sauce of its silky texture.   We suggest bringing the yogurt up to room temperature and letting the chicken cool slightly before marrying the two in the pan.  

Be sure to have plenty of nan or good pita bread handy.   You will need it to scoop up all that “so good it might make you cry” yogurt sauce.

Turmeric Braised Chicken in Yogurt


1   ½ cups Greek-style yogurt stirred until creamy

3 lbs skinless, bone-in chicken legs and thighs, separated
1/2 cup olive oil

2 large onions, pureed in food processor (or finely chopped)
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
1 tbsp. ground turmeric
1/2   tbsp. ground coriander

1 cup fresh cilantro, roughly chopped
 
Remove the yogurt from the refrigerator.   Wash the chicken and pat dry with a dish towel or paper towel.  


Heat ¼ cup of the oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot with a lid.  Cook the onions over medium-high heat for 10 minutes.  Add the garlic and continue to saute until deeply browned (another 5 minutes or so).
 
Add the remainder of the oil, the chicken and salt.  Stir the chicken to coat with the onions, turn heat to low, put on the lid and cook for 25 minutes.  Stir regularly to keep the chicken from sticking to the bottom of the pan.  Add the pepper, turmeric and coriander and stir well to incorporate the spices evenly into the dish.   It should take on a deep yellow color.   Cover and continue to cook on low for another㺙 to 30 minutes or until the sauce thickens and the chicken is tender and cooked through.  If the pan goes dry during cooking add water, a tablespoon at a time, as needed.

Remove the pan from the heat and let it rest for 10 minutes to cool the dish slightly.   Add the yogurt and cilantro and stir thoroughly.     Return to the heat and gently cook over low heat for 5 minutes.   The sauce will be thick & creamy.

Serve with basmati rice such as challaw and nan or pita bread.

Note:   if you plan to make this a day ahead, cook the chicken but refrain from the last step of the recipe, adding the yogurt.   When   you are ready to serve, gently reheat the chicken to warm (but not hot), add the room-temperature yogurt and cilantro, and continue to cook for 5 minutes until heated through.  

Except where otherwise noted, all content on this blog is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported license.


Braised Yogurt Recipes

  • Curry And Yogurt Braised Chicken Thighs

The creaminess in this quick-braised chicken curry comes from tangy Greek-s .

Serve this with a side of steamed basmati rice or Savory Semolina . Be sure .

Serve this with a side of steamed basmati rice or Savory Semolina. Be sure .

As a change from rice, pasta or couscous, try little falafel with a simple .

Try delicious recipes using Dannon Yogurt. It's got 80% less fat than regul .

For this tender and savory dish, pork tenderloin is browned on the stovetop .

Nice recipe in old cookbook, made it this weekend @ home and everyone loved .

Saut?ing the cauliflower before braising intensifies its naturally mild, sw .

Food Network invites you to try this Yogurt Braised Leg of Lamb recipe.

Heat 3 Tbsp. peanut oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Bro .

Spiced Braised and Grilled Spare Ribs with Tahini-Yogurt Sauce - The Huffin .


Introduction:

String hoppers are like little lacy pancakes made out of rice flour. It is a common dish eaten for breakfast in Sri Lanka and South India (especially in Kerala). However, this pilaf, which is like a &lsquostring hopper version&rsquo of a biryani, can be served for lunch or dinner.

Steps Involved:

Break the string hoppers into small pieces and keep aside. Heat Noor Oil in a large saucepan and fry the onion, green chillies, pandan leaf and curry leaves until the onion turns golden. Add the cardamom pods cloves and turmeric and stir well. Next add the grated carrot and shredded leek and fry gently till for 2-3 minutes. Add the string hoppers, season well with salt and toss everything together until well mixed.

Spoon onto a large serving dish and garnish with halved boiled eggs and fried cashews and raisins. Serve with a spicy chicken or meat curry.


Introduction:

String hoppers are like little lacy pancakes made out of rice flour. It is a common dish eaten for breakfast in Sri Lanka and South India (especially in Kerala). However, this pilaf, which is like a &lsquostring hopper version&rsquo of a biryani, can be served for lunch or dinner.

Steps Involved:

Break the string hoppers into small pieces and keep aside. Heat Noor Oil in a large saucepan and fry the onion, green chillies, pandan leaf and curry leaves until the onion turns golden. Add the cardamom pods cloves and turmeric and stir well. Next add the grated carrot and shredded leek and fry gently till for 2-3 minutes. Add the string hoppers, season well with salt and toss everything together until well mixed.

Spoon onto a large serving dish and garnish with halved boiled eggs and fried cashews and raisins. Serve with a spicy chicken or meat curry.


Midtown Lunch

Yesterday, Midtown Lunch became Chef central with the opening of Bon Appetit’s “Pop Up Cafe” in the old Hard Rock Cafe space on 57th btw. 7+8th. Open from 11am to 3pm, the Cafe is essentially a gussied up Cafe Metro, serving up fancy sandwiches, soups & salads created by famous chefs like Govind Armstrong (Table 8), Cat Cora (Iron Chef), Giada De Laurentiis (Food Network), and Emeril, plus desserts from Will Goldfarb (Picnick) and Pichet Ong (P*ong).

Everyday there will also be demonstrations from the Chefs, plus free samplings of wine, Ice Cream from Haagen Dazs and chocolate from Ghirardelli to make you not care that you just spent $9 for a sandwich! I don’t normally like paying so much for this kind of lunch- but what can I say? I’m a whore for celebrity chefs…

Fancy salad, sandwich and soup porn, PLUS a schedule of events (and photo of my free ice cream!)- after the jump…

Everything is under $10, with sandwiches and salads being anywhere from $7-9, soups $5, and desserts around $2-4. Here are the some of the things they’ll be serving up…

For salads, they’re got a Michael Mina Roasted Beets & Burrata Cheese w/ Arugula & Balsamic, a Goat Cheese Caesar Salad from Michel Richard, another Michael Mina creation (Smoked Salmon Nicoise), and more.

Yesterday they were serving Michael Mina’s Tomato Gazpacho with Peekytoe Crab & Avocado, but I think the soups are going to change every day. At some point in the next week, there will be a Corn & Crab Bisque courtesy of Emeril Lagasse, a Potato Celery Soup from Cat Cora, plus others…

Sandwich wise they’ve got a Muffuletta from Giada de Laurentiis, Tropical Rolls from Govind Armonstrong, a Roast Beef with Marinated Onions and Blue Cheese sandwich from Bon Appetit and more.

Everyday they will have new specials. Yesterday, it was Govind Armonstrong’s Grilled Cheese w/ Pulled Short Rib Sandwich (which was pretty, pretty, pretty good), and today I heard it was going to be the Bon Appetit Cabernet Braised Short Ribs w/ Gorgonzola Polenta and Mixed Herb Gremolata (but I’m not positive). Other specials they plan on serving include Cat Cora’s Sunday Cheese Steak Sandwich w/ Provolone Sauce & Michel Richard’s Chicken Nuggets w/ Snow Pea Linguine.

The dessert table looked pretty awesome (Will Goldfarb’s mom’s chocolate chip cookies, spiced coconut brownies from Pichet Ong, and more), but I didn’t try them because they were sampling FREE Haagen Dazs upstairs.

The “sample” could have easily been a $10 dessert at a fancy restaurant, and was hands down the best part of the cafe! It’s upstairs, between the free wine samples, and the free Ghirardelli samples.

The Cafe is open weekdays from 11am to 3pm, now through next Friday November 2nd on West 57th btw. 7+8th. They will also have the chefs doing demos throughout the week. Today, it’s Michael Mina at 12:15, and Pichet Ong at 1:15 (plus free mojitos from the Rums of Puerto Rico after 1:45 for those of you looking for a liquid lunch!)

Posted by Zach Brooks at 8:58 am, October 26th, 2007 under Bon Appetit.
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Wednesday, January 6, 2010

A Night Out

My friend, Andrea and I were looking for something fun to do together - without the kids, away from work and without a designated driver. I was flipping through a Sur La Table catalog and came across their cooking class they were offering Indian, Dish By Dish (Andrea was also the friend that gave me the super delicious Indian cookbook for my birthday). This seemed like a perfect match for us!

So last night, Andrea and I and about 13 other people assembled at the Kirkland, WA Sur La Table for some instruction, socialization and good food. The class started at 06:30 PM and we left around 09:00 PM - in between, we cooked Curried Beef Samosas with Mango-Papaya Chutney, Savory Semolina, Coconut-Vegetable Curry, and Yogurt-Braised Chicken with Cashews and Raisins.

I enjoyed the class - it was a nice mix of people, both young and old and all seemed to have fun. The instructor was knowledgeable and he explained everything very well - he seemed to really like teaching people and the 3 Sur La Table helpers were wonderful too! The instructor broke us up in to groups of 5 and we all did the prep for a specific dish (Andrea & I worked on the Coconut-Vegetable Curry). The chicken was cooked ahead of time and so was the ground beef for the samosas, so we added spices, veggies and various sauces to the meat dishes to complete them. Everyone made their own samosa (some made a few more than others). The instructor and assistants finished the cooking while we were on a short shopping break (we all got 15% off of any purchase that evening). Then we came back and ate all the food.

My favorite dish was the Coconut-Vegetable Curry (it was also Andrea's). I will admit that if I made it at home, I would meat to it and serve it with rice. The samosas were ok - we used wonton wrappers and I thought that took away from the "Indian" flavor a bit. When I have meat samosas out, they always are spiced well and the dough is more flavorful. The chutney that went with the samosas though was delicious and I really enjoyed it to my surprise (I don't really like mangos much, but paired with vinegar and curry spices it was awesome). The chicken had a really good flavor and was very tender - the sauce that went with it broke and was not the most pleasing to the eye. My least favorite dish was the semolina - it reminded me of mashed potatoes (don't get me wrong, I like mashed potatoes - I would have rather had rice or naan instead).


Watch the video: Κοτόπουλο παπρικάζ με γιαούρτι - Konstantinas kitchen (December 2021).