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Australian Family Wins KFC Food Poisoning Lawsuit and More News

Australian Family Wins KFC Food Poisoning Lawsuit and More News

In today's Media Mix, box stores stir up competition for fast-food giants, plus Orlando food truck worker killed

Arthur Bovino

The Daily Meal's Weekly Media Mix rounds up the week's big food stories.

• Family Wins Food Poisoning Case: It's a good day for the family of 12-year-old Monika Samaan: after the then-7-year-old contracted salmonella from a KFC Twister in 2005, she spent nearly six months in a coma and had severe brain damange. Now, Samaan, now a quadriplegic, and her family have won a case against the store for $10 million. [ABC News] [Updated: KFC will pay $8.3 million to the family, as of April 30, and plans to appeal the decision.]

• Costco, Home Depot Offer Competition for Fast-Food Companies: Offering lower prices at food courts and cafeterias, big-box stores have fast-food chains beat in convenience. [USA Today]

• Ground Roots for Farm Bill 2012: Congress has begun to lay down the groundwork for controversial cuts to food stamp programs with the Farm Bill, set to expire in September. [Associated Press]

• Food Truck Worker Killed: A 65-year-old Orlando, Fla., woman was killed while working in a food truck serving late-night diners leaving Oblivion Taproom, authorities said. Police are looking for two suspects accused of the attempted robbery, during which the victim was shot in the chest and died later at the hospital. [WFTV]

• Kellogg Expands Into Snack Foods: Despite Americans' love for cereal waning, Kellogg is taking a new approach to winning hearts (and stomachs): snack foods. The acquisition of Pringles, a deal set to close this summer, is a start. [NY Times]


Sydney family wins court case against KFC

The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

“We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

“We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

“You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

“Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

“If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

  • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
    • This is a criminal case.
    • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
    • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

    Sydney family wins court case against KFC

    The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

    KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

    KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

    In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

    “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

    “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

    In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

    During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

    Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

    She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

    KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

    “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

    “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

    He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

    But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

    “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

    He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

    Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

    The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

    KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

    • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
      • This is a criminal case.
      • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
      • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

      Sydney family wins court case against KFC

      The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

      KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

      KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

      In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

      “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

      “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

      In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

      During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

      Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

      She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

      KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

      “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

      “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

      He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

      But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

      “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

      He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

      Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

      The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

      KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

      • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
        • This is a criminal case.
        • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
        • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

        Sydney family wins court case against KFC

        The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

        KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

        KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

        In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

        “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

        “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

        In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

        During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

        Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

        She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

        KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

        “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

        “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

        He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

        But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

        “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

        He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

        Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

        The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

        KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

        • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
          • This is a criminal case.
          • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
          • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

          Sydney family wins court case against KFC

          The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

          KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

          KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

          In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

          “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

          “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

          In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

          During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

          Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

          She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

          KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

          “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

          “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

          He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

          But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

          “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

          He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

          Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

          The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

          KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

          • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
            • This is a criminal case.
            • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
            • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

            Sydney family wins court case against KFC

            The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

            KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

            KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

            In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

            “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

            “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

            In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

            During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

            Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

            She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

            KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

            “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

            “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

            He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

            But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

            “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

            He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

            Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

            The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

            KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

            • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
              • This is a criminal case.
              • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
              • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

              Sydney family wins court case against KFC

              The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

              KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

              KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

              In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

              “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

              “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

              In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

              During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

              Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

              She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

              KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

              “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

              “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

              He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

              But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

              “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

              He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

              Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

              The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

              KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

              • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
                • This is a criminal case.
                • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
                • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

                Sydney family wins court case against KFC

                The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

                KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

                KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

                In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

                “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

                “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

                In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

                During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

                Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

                She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

                KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

                “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

                “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

                He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

                But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

                “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

                He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

                Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

                The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

                KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

                • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
                  • This is a criminal case.
                  • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
                  • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

                  Sydney family wins court case against KFC

                  The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

                  KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

                  KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

                  In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

                  “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

                  “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

                  In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

                  During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

                  Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

                  She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

                  KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

                  “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

                  “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

                  He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

                  But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

                  “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

                  He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

                  Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

                  The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

                  KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

                  • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
                    • This is a criminal case.
                    • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
                    • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.

                    Sydney family wins court case against KFC

                    The family of Monika Samaan brought a multimillion-dollar compensation bid against KFC in the New South Wales Supreme Court, claiming the then seven-year-old became ill after eating the chicken wrap in Sydney’s west in 2005.

                    KFC denied the claim but this afternoon Justice Stephen Rothman found in favour of the family in the NSW Supreme Court.

                    KFC has vowed to appeal the ruling.

                    In a statement, the restaurant said the case was clearly tragic but they were “deeply disappointed and surprised” by Judge Rothman’s decision.

                    “We believe the evidence showed KFC did not cause this tragedy and, after reviewing the judgment and seeking further advice from our lawyers, we have decided to appeal Justice Rothman’s decision,” KFC Australia’s chief corporate affairs officer Sally Glover said.

                    “We feel deeply for Monika and the Samaan family, however, we also have a responsibility to defend KFC’s reputation as a provider of safe, high-quality food.”

                    In their statement, KFC did not refer to the judge having made any assessment yet of the damages to be awarded to the family.

                    During a four-week trial in 2010, Monika’s father Amanwial Samaan told the court he and his wife Hanna, son Abanou and Monika all fell ill with vomiting and diarrhoea after sharing the Twister.

                    Monika, who was in a coma for six months and in hospital for seven, is effectively now a quadriplegic and severely brain damaged.

                    She took the NSW Supreme Court action through her father.

                    KFC’s lawyer, Ian Barker QC, argued there “never was a shared Twister” because there was no sales data to prove the family purchased it.

                    “You did not tell anyone at the hospital, when you were there between October 27 and 29, that you had shared a KFC Twister that Monday,” Mr Barker said in the NSW Supreme Court in July 2010.

                    “Because there was no direct question at me,” Mr Samaan replied.

                    He also accused Mr Samaan of thinking KFC “might be an easy target”.

                    But the family’s barrister, Anthony Bartley SC, presented evidence about KFC food practices that were “disturbing and unsettling”.

                    “If the store was particularly busy, then even if chicken dropped on the floor… it was on some occasions simply put back into the burger station from where it had fallen,” he said.

                    He told the court Monika, who had been a bright girl, could now feed herself to a limited extent but wears a nappy and goes to a special school.

                    Her father had given up his job as a forklift driver so he could help look after her.

                    The judgment was not listed for delivery at the NSW Supreme Court today but a decision was handed down unexpectedly at around 4.30pm, a KFC spokesperson said.

                    KFC said it would not comment further on the matter as it is now on appeal.

                    • The facts of the matter are that a Sydney family won a court case against KFC as a father states that his daughter is now severely brain damaged due to the salmonella poisoning in a KFC wrap she ate. The seven-year-old was in a coma for 6 months and hospital for 7, is now a quadriplegic ad has serve brain damage. KFC has now had to pay out millions of dollars due to its lack of customer care.
                      • This is a criminal case.
                      • The jurisdiction is the Supreme court
                      • The key personal is: the victim- the seven-year-old girl. The plaintiff- her family. The defendant- KFC.


                      Watch the video: Entire state of NSW in lockdown, caravan set on fire on busy Gold Coast road. 9 News Australia (December 2021).